Rhiza Labs FluTracker Forum

The place to discuss the flu
It is currently Mon Oct 16, 2017 7:43 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2014 1:07 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Saah Exco is with his 6-year-old brother, aunt and cousin together, but his brother died in an isolated area, aunts and cousins ​​do not know the direction. After the device isolation area were looted, he fled with a few patients a piece. The picture shows local residents to discuss how to help Saah Exco.

http://news.ifeng.com/a/20140820/41653846_0.shtml#p=2

(6 pictures)

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 20, 2014 7:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
AUDIO
Reporting On Ebola: An Abandoned 10-Year-Old, A Nervous Neighborhood
by MARC SILVER
August 20, 2014 5:03 AM ET
Image
Saah Exco, a ten-year-old boy suspected of being sick with Ebola, was found naked on the beach by residents of West Point. They dressed him but couldn't find a clinic to take him in at first. Eventually he was was taken to JFK Hospital in Monrovia.

David Gilkey/NPR
Monrovia, the capital of Liberia, is under nighttime curfew as that country struggles to contain the Ebola epidemic. On Wednesday, an entire neighborhood in Monrovia was quarantined, sealed off from the rest of the city by the government. The neighborhood is called West Point and it's where a holding center for patients suspected of having Ebola was attacked over the weekend. Patients fled, and looters carried off bloody mattresses and other possibly infected supplies. The NPR team in Liberia visited West Point on Tuesday. We spoke to correspondent Nurith Aizenman about the experience.

What is West Point like?

It is a sort of finger of land, a little sandy peninsula that juts out from a nicer area of Monrovia, abutting a river on one side and the ocean on the other. It's about 800 meters long and 550 meters wide. There are only two roads in that are paved. The rest is a thicket of shacks and houses and huts, pretty much all one story and built of plywood or cement blocks, with corrugated metal on the rooftops. Between them are sandy pathways. It's so closely packed that in some cases if you're trying to get to your house you have to walk through someone else's house.

Both sides of the paved roads are packed with shops selling all manners of goods, vegetables, fish. There are throngs of people, carrying big buckets on their heads with all sorts of goods. If you drive in, you gently nudge your way forward, parting this sea of people.

And that's where NPR's photographer David Gilkey encountered the ten-year-old in the picture above?

Residents had originally found this boy naked on the beach. They dragged him up to a sort of alleyway and put a shirt and pants on him. But beyond that no one wanted to touch him, no one wanted to give him shelter, because it seems he was a child who had been at that holding center for Ebola patients.

Where is the boy now?

A woman went to a nearby health clinic to see if they would take the boy in, but she said the clinic refused because he may have Ebola. The boy was looking very ill at this point. But we heard from someone in West Point that the boy has now been taken to JFK hospital, where the government, with the assistance of the World Health Organization, has just opened the fourth treatment center for Ebola. And although I haven't confirmed it, we heard accounts that the boy seemed to have revived a little bit.

What do people in West Point think about the raid on the center?

We talked to several people who were upset that there was no effort to alert the community as to what this center was about, and they were also upset that the center had accepted people from other neighborhoods.

Some people said they want the center to reopen as long as they would be assured that no one from outside the community would be brought there and that they would be included in communications about the center.

You mentioned yesterday that some Liberians are skeptical about Ebola — they think it's something the government made up to get more foreign aid. What do they think in West Point?

We've heard reports that at the raid, people were shouting "Ebola doesn't exist." But if you think the disease doesn't exist, why would you be mad that people from other neighborhoods with this supposed nonexistent disease would have been brought in? The bottom line is that there is a lot of fear and confusion.

Is this a tough story to report?

It's difficult. Normally you would not be afraid of children. But now you have to be wary of children because a child will come and tug on your sleeve. That's not threatening in other places but here things are different. I keep my hands in my pockets at all times.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2 ... um=twitter

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 4:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
The 10-Year-Old Boy Has Died, Probably Of Ebola
by MARC SILVER
August 21, 2014 3:29 PM ET

It was a photo that took the Ebola outbreak raging in West Africa and made it very personal. A little boy named Saah Exco, 10 years old, lies in a crumpled heap.
Image

Audio available at 7 PM ET
http://www.npr.org/templates/rundowns/r ... 08-22-2014

As NPR's Nurith Aizenman explained Wednesday, hours before, the boy had been found naked on a beach in West Point, an impoverished neighborhood in Monrovia, Liberia's capital city. At one point, Saah had been a patient at the Ebola holding center there, for suspected cases. It's unclear when or why he was released.

Reporting On Ebola: An Abandoned 10-Year-Old, A Nervous Neighborhood
But now he was on his own, drifting in and out of consciousness.

People in the neighborhood knew him. Somehow, they brought him to an alleyway. They gave him a shirt and pants. But no one wanted to hold him, to take him into a home.

Image
Saah Exco puts on a shirt after neighbors in Liberia's West Point found him on the beach.

David Gilkey/NPR
Many folks in West Point — and throughout West Africa — don't think Ebola is real. Yet they were afraid. What if Ebola really is real and what if the boy had the virus? It's what NPR photographer David Gilkey, who took the photo of the boy that ran on our website, calls "an evil Catch 22."

Efforts were made to get him to a clinic but the clinic said no: The facility was not equipped to handle suspected Ebola patients.

Eventually a neighbor took Saah to John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital in Monrovia, which cares for Ebola patients.

There was a brief glimmer of hope yesterday — word came that the boy was improving.

Then today, his fate became clear. Getty photographer John Moore, who had also taken pictures of Saah, spoke to the boy's aunt. She was checking into a Doctors Without Borders hospital in Monrovia with her five children — all of them, including her, suspected Ebola cases. The aunt said that Saah died yesterday at JFK hospital. She said the boy's mother had previously died of Ebola as well.

In a country where some believe that the virus isn't real, Saah Exco is now one of more than 500 victims, sealed in a tiny body bag.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2 ... um=social#

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 4:28 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
A week earlier

Image

Saah Exco boy 10 years ebola virus infected looking into the camera in a small hospital in a poor area of West Point, Monrovia, Liberia, August 14, 2014.

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 4:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
62 Comments
NPR Goats & Soda
Login
1
Sort by Best
Favorite
Share

Join the discussion…

Avatar
Delta York • a day ago
The death of a child always magnifies the sense of tragedy, but for a child to have died even without the comfort of a loving touch is just even more heart-rending.
175 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Peter Mitchell Delta York • 20 hours ago
Delta York, there are other organizations that help out in similar manners. NODA is one. It stands for No One Dies Alone. They help visit people terminally ill people in hospitals who might not have anybody to visit.
The Samaritans and No More Deaths help provide first aid, food, and water to travelers making the very dangerous crossing of the Sonora desert in southern Arizona. Plenty of migrants have died alone in the desert. If need be, they will wait with an injured migrant until help (Border Patrol) can arrive to safely evacuate the person.
6 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells Delta York • 21 hours ago
Oh, there were some loving touches all right. Probably enough to have ten or twenty more kids come down with ebola in the next couple of weeks.
2 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
TaWandrea Bland Delta York • 38 minutes ago
That is the truth. I can only imagine his fear. The poor child.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Davey's thunderpegasus • a day ago
This is a tragedy,but I have paradoxically been heartened by this article. Very rarely do we humanize young victims of international crises. This young boy now has a name, a face, and a story which would otherwise be represented as some sad statistical figure.
62 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
bernese mountaindog • a day ago
Bravo to the neighbor who risked his life taking him to the hospital.
60 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
NPRHIGH • a day ago
All the money that goes toward contesting / winning elections; monies spent getting the latest and greatest weaponry. If only a quarter of these funds could be diverted towards global health, the world could be so much better off.
65 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Joseph Christian NPRHIGH • a day ago
"Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the cloud of threatening war, it is humanity hanging from a cross of iron."

- Dwight D. Eisenhower
110 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Dr Jan Joseph Christian • 20 hours ago
Great quote, thanks!
5 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells Joseph Christian • 21 hours ago
This is so true. Don't we all wish people would quit trying to change the status quo so there would be no more need of war?
5 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
FEL1NE NPRHIGH • a day ago
Those funds should be allocated equally toward the conservation/preservation/protection of myriad animal species and the environment. Exponential growth of human population is destroying this Earth. That's why mother nature has evolved such viruses to balance out the human population.
14 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Lillian O FEL1NE • 21 hours ago
And would you like to volunteer to help 'balance out the human population' or do you prefer that these poor people who barely consume any resources be the ones to die.
10 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
FEL1NE Lillian O • 6 hours ago
I've already volunteered myself by not choosing to reproduce and by reducing my daily carbon footprint. So what have you done for planet Earth?

People die whether they're poor or not, so your accusatory insinuation is a moot point. Poor people are the ones who are silently murdering the planet because they don't know any better, because they are ignorant, and ignorance perpetuates ignorance. Poor people barely consume any resources? People are parasites, rich or poor; and they're eating away this Earth, yourself included.
2 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells Lillian O • 21 hours ago
What makes you say they barely consume any resources at all? They're like a plague of locusts.
2 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
allencraig Vern Wells • 20 hours ago
Are you kidding? 10 people from almost any country in Africa consume less than one entitled pig from the US. People from the United States are the locusts of the planet. By far.
24 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells allencraig • 19 hours ago
There aren't enough people in the U.S. to be "the locusts of the planet". Besides, we generally produce enough for our own needs and more too. Why doesn't Africa learn to produce surpluses?
2 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Ngoc Ho Vern Wells • 18 hours ago
yrs of colonialism
1 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Alison allencraig • 17 hours ago
Entitled pigs? How many people from your country are in Western Africa risking their lives to help Ebola victims? Oh, that's right.
Check yourself, allencraig.
1 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
allencraig Alison • 6 hours ago
Uh, a handful. "My country" is the US, and aside from the relative handful who actually care about other people and make an effort to make the world slightly better, the vast, VAST majority live life like the planet, its resources and all it's people exist for THEIR comfort. So yes, the term "entitled pig" applies quite well to the politicians, corporations, culture, and the majority of citizens of the US.
Don't tell me to "check myself" until you do a little reading on who's largely responsible for most of the unnecessary suffering in the world.
4 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
FEL1NE Lillian O • 6 hours ago
Your statement is a moot point as I did not say that poor people should be the ones to die. Everyone will die eventually. I am contributing to balance out the human population by choosing to not reproduce and to be cognizant of and diminishing my daily carbon footprint. So what have you done for planet Earth?
1 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Peter_W FEL1NE • 20 hours ago
That the human race is growing exponentially is a myth. We are likely to level off at 11 billion, which is a lot and will bring challenges, but the idea we are speeding towards a Malthusian world is an idea 40-50 years out of date, at least.
4 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
ScottishPleather Peter_W • 20 hours ago
That is a LOT more than are here now and the Earth is struggling. We are on the way to global collapse if we do not reduce our numbers from what they are now.
5 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Steve Mitchell Peter_W • 20 hours ago
We may be on the verge of a Malthusian crisis. Many third world countries are near the tipping point. The US is projected to have 500 million in 25 years, Asia 5 billion and Africa 4 billion.
4 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
allencraig Peter_W • 20 hours ago
How could you possibly know that?
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
octobertraveler FEL1NE • a day ago
Nice.
1 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
ScottishPleather octobertraveler • 21 hours ago
The truth hurts, but it's still the truth.
2 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
octobertraveler ScottishPleather • 20 hours ago
Well, you're in good fictional company--Scrooge wanted to reduce "the surplus population" as well.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
ScottishPleather NPRHIGH • 21 hours ago
It would be worse off. I know that sounds harsh but there are far too many people on this rock. Although my heart does go out to this little boy, I hope he finds peace where ever he is.
4 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
allencraig ScottishPleather • 20 hours ago
The planet can sustain plenty more people. It's how irresponsibly we are living on this rock that is the problem.
8 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
stegall • a day ago
I've been searching this little boys name every few hours since I first read the story a couple days ago, hoping that I would read something good. Breaks my heart to think about the suffering that this little boy did with no one to hold him. I'm sure that there are many others just like him.
38 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
starsandstones • a day ago
How heart breaking, he was so small and all alone.
30 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Throckmorten Codswallop • a day ago
Some deaths are just so pointedly tragic and wrong and painful that describing them becomes almost impossible. As if any death at age ten wasn't bad enough; due to collective ignorance and fear, this pitiful child is forced to make the final journey alone.
So similar to Kevin Carters' agonizing image from 1994 in the Sudan, of a vulture patiently waiting as a child lays dying alone of starvation. The horrors we inflict on those most in need of our best compassion.
16 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
oksunny • a day ago
poor sweet baby.
16 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
lea mangelsdorf • 19 hours ago
Tears are running down my face. He died at such a young age, but even worse, abandoned. Think about any ten year old you know-can you imagine discarding them? I realize the very real fear involved but still fall back on the idea of a baby left to die-heartbreaking.
10 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
miamichick99 lea mangelsdorf • 18 hours ago
It is truly heartbreaking. :( In this case though I'm not sure that he was totally abandoned. He had been at an Ebola clinic at some point. My guess is that he left willingly without anyone noticing so that he could grieve the death of his mother.
2 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Lencho • 17 hours ago
Peace, peace! he is not dead, he doth not sleep,
He hath awaken'd from the dream of life;

Shelly
9 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Small Town Girl Big City Heart • 19 hours ago
Very Touching, whatever we've got going on in our lives- is small beans compared to this little boy, the mother with 5 children who are all infected and the rest of Africa.
What a moving write up. As a Mother of two, I don't even want to imagine. The suffering saddens me so.
9 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Babinkley • 19 hours ago
That poor little child. God bless him. Why is it the poor and the weak are always the ones who have to suffer so terribly?
6 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
blackshadow • 18 hours ago
Little guy.....Rest in Peace Saah
5 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
funbobby51 • a day ago
I think I would be afraid to touch someone with Ebola too, especially without the proper protective gear
8 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Meg Malloy • 18 hours ago
Terrible. Rest easy, little one, wherever it is we go after this life.
3 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells Meg Malloy • 8 hours ago
Maggots' intestinal tracts would be my guess. Same place Rover goes after this life. Same place you and I are going when we die.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Clarkster Vern Wells • 5 hours ago
wow you know how to scratch a spiritual LP in mid-melody.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells Clarkster • 5 hours ago
Actually, I'm just curious about what axis people are on when they contradict themselves by swinging from one side to the other so easily. Why do they think humans are so special that they're different from, say, a roach when they die? Is this some kind of religious axis or dividing line here?
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Clarkster Vern Wells • 4 hours ago
To be blunt, I'm sure all creatures put their species on a pedestal above others...Can you imagine what the cockroach thinks of us? None to good since we make a habit of squashing them. Its just that primal narcissistic gene deep in all of us that reaches beyond formal religion and the need to belong to the group spiritually.
1 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells Clarkster • 4 hours ago
Yep. And that's why I've always maintained that there will never be peace through equality. The closest we'll ever come is stability through an enforced status quo where proven inferiors accept themselves as inferior and get on about the business of living. We'll never have a society where everyone is above average. But hardly anyone will admit to being below average.
1 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Mari McAvenia Vern Wells • 2 hours ago
Reading your misanthropic screeds leads me to believe that you are among the top "inferiors" of the human race. Accept the fact that you score way above average on the psychopathy scale. Take that hateful attitude straight to the bank and let the rest of us take care of one another in a decent, humane manner, please.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Michelle Noel • a day ago
Such sadness.
3 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Mike Woods • 15 hours ago
This life's a test. Saah is a child: they just 'CLEP' out of the test if they pass to the other side.

Will each of us in good faith act to love and help others in any of countless situations? That is the recurrent true-false question comprising the test.

One way to answer this one is by giving to the CDC Foundation's Emergency Response Fund; Americares; and Doctors Without Borders.

http://cdcfoundation.org/

Friends I don't know, let's help each other pass the test.
2 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Glambike • 18 hours ago
And some say there is a god...I'm sure if there was one she would say "Ok, this is enough pathetic suffering for one world."
2 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells Glambike • 8 hours ago
If there was a god, this would probably be how it would put this kid out of his misery. Or do you believe he's suffering even more now?
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Glambike Vern Wells • 27 minutes ago
He like all my brothers and sisters who've passed out of this life are unconsciously part of Gaia now.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Glambike • 21 hours ago
It is said that 75% of the ebola victims are female. I'm sure it must be the case that girls are getting abandoned too. Can a reporter cover those cases as well?
1 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Lencho Glambike • 17 hours ago
If you want to suggest a story go to the contact link at the bottom of the page and chose Submit a story or idea from the drop down menu on the comment form.
2 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Chrid D • 8 hours ago
I'm setting at my dining table. A/C is set to 73 degrees F, four light bulbs in the kitchen are on, my isolation aquarium is water that contains no fish; since they are all well fed and healthy in a 1,000 gallon pond that's filtered 24/7. I will be putting about 300 miles on my 300+ HP Lexus later today because I couldn't keep my family together; due to someone wanting the title of having their own house. This adds up to two homes, 3 persons, 150 miles apart, and a lot of added energy consumed; picking up and dropping off. I DONT BELIVE MY STORY IS ALL THAT UNCOMMON. WONDER HOW MANY SUBSAHARAN AFRICANS LIVE SIMILARLY.
OH . . . I didn't mention; I'm not even close to being in the top 20%
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Dave's Widow Chrid D • 4 hours ago
How is this relevant to the story above? It isn't.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells Chrid D • 8 hours ago
Maybe not in this country, but on a global basis, you're probably in the top 2%.

And that's absolutely fine with me. You're probably among the top 2% of producers, too.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Newbie1 • a day ago
"There was a brief glimmer of hope yesterday — word came that the boy was improving."

You're all REAL jerks.
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Beverly Arthur Newbie1 • a day ago
Who are you referring to as "REAL jerks?" The people in the region who were afraid they would catch the virus? His family who abandoned him to die alone? (they would qualify) The doctors and nurses who tried to save him? The people (NPR) reporting the event, or the readers? Your comment is very unclear.
25 • Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Vern Wells • 7 hours ago
People sure have funny ideas about death. I wonder why. Prejudices?
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Jim Bouldin • 8 hours ago
It is noteworthy that the initial case in this entire outbreak was a 2 year old child, in remote Guinea, last December
• Reply•Share ›
Avatar
Steven B. • 19 hours ago
Sad how conspiracy wackos can fool people into believing their delusions.
• Reply•Share ›

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 8:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
NPR Audio now available

http://www.npr.org/player/v2/mediaPlaye ... 279&live=1

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 8:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Nigeria Confirms New Ebola Cases, Boy Killed In Liberia Quarantine Zone
AP | By BASHIR ADIGUN and JONATHAN PAYE-LAYLEH
Posted: 08/22/2014 9:15 am EDT Updated: 4 hours ago
VIDEO & SLIDE SHOW

ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) — Two alarming new cases of Ebola have emerged in Nigeria, widening the circle of people sickened beyond the immediate group of caregivers who treated a dying airline passenger in one of Africa's largest cities.

The outbreak also continues to spread elsewhere in West Africa, with 142 more cases recorded, bringing the new total to 2,615 with 1,427 deaths, the World Health Organization said Friday.

Most of the new cases are in Liberia, where the government was delivering donated rice to a slum where 50,000 people have been sealed off from the rest of the capital in an attempt to contain the outbreak.


New treatment centers in Liberia are being overwhelmed by patients that were not previously identified. One center with 20 beds opened its doors to 70 possibly infected people, likely coming from "shadow-zones" where people fearing authorities won't let doctors enter, the U.N health agency said.

"This phenomenon strongly suggests the existence of an invisible caseload of patients who are not being detected by the surveillance system," the agency said. This has "never before been seen in an Ebola outbreak."

The two new cases in Nigeria were infected by their spouses, both medical workers who had direct contact with Liberian-American Patrick Sawyer, who flew into Nigeria from Liberia and Togo and infected 11 others before he died in July. The male and female caregivers also then died of Ebola, Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said Friday.

Nigerian officials initially claimed the risk of exposure to others was minimal because Sawyer was whisked into isolation after arriving at the airport. Lagos state health commissioner Jide Idris later acknowledged that Sawyer was not immediately quarantined.

The two new cases were quarantined two days ago while being tested, Chukwu said. They had previously been under surveillance, meaning they were contacted daily to see if they developed any symptoms, but their movements were not restricted. Once they showed signs of the disease, they were brought in.

Authorities are now trying to identify and monitor everyone they have been in contact with.

In all, 213 people are now under surveillance in Nigeria, including six people, all "secondary contacts" like the caregivers' spouses, being monitored in the state of Enugu, more than 310 miles (500 kilometers) east of Lagos.

A mobile laboratory capable of diagnosing the disease has been moved there, Chukwu said.

Nigeria's total of confirmed infections is now 16. Five of them have died and five have recovered; the rest are being treated in isolation in Lagos, the commercial capital where Sawyer's flight landed.

The damage has been far greater in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, each dealing with hundreds of cases. Liberia has been hit hardest, recording 1,082 cases and 624 deaths.

In Liberia, a teenage boy died after being shot by security forces in West Point, a slum that was blockaded this week to stop the spread of Ebola, a Liberia government spokesman said Friday. Shakie Kamara was hurt in a clash with police and soldiers who sealed off their peninsula from the rest of Monrovia.

Days earlier in West Point, slum dwellers ransacked a holding center for Ebola patients after realizing that some patients had come from other parts of the city. Looters then made off with bloody sheets and mattresses that could spread the disease.

The government began distributing rice, some of it donated by the World Food Program, to alleviate food shortages a day after cordoning off the slum, said Information Minister Lewis Brown.

Some countries also continue to impose travel restrictions, even though they aren't recommended by the UN health agency.

On Friday, the Central African country of Gabon announced it was barring all flights and ships from Ebola-stricken countries. South Africa already announced a travel ban for non-citizens from these countries "unless the travel is considered absolutely essential." Senegal closed its borders with Guinea, and is barring air or sea travel from Sierra Leone and Liberia. Cameroon barred flights from Nigeria.

__

Paye-Layleh reported from Monrovia, Liberia. Associated Press writers Maram Mazan in Lagos, Nigeria; Babacar Dione in Dakar, Senegal; and Yves-Laurent Goma in Libreville, Gabon, contributed reporting.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/2 ... 99062.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 62 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group