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PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 7:22 pm 
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Media reports name three doctors from Africa who received ZMapp (Doctors Zukunis Ireland and Abraham Borbor from Liberia and Dr. Aroh Cosmos Izchukwu from Nigeria).

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 7:24 pm 
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Liberia gives experimental Ebola drug to three African doctors
By Clair MacDougall

MONROVIA Sat Aug 16, 2014 11:44pm BST
(Reuters) - Health care workers in Liberia have administered three doses of the rare, experimental drug ZMapp to three doctors suffering from Ebola, two medical workers in Monrovia told Reuters.

Liberia, the West African country with the highest death toll from the tropical virus at 413, received three doses of the rare serum in a special consignment this week.

Doctors Zukunis Ireland and Abraham Borbor from Liberia and Dr. Aroh Cosmos Izchukwu from Nigeria are the first Africans to receive the treatment. The drug has already been administered to two American healthcare workers and a Spanish priest, all previously working in Liberian hospitals.

The U.S. healthcare workers' health has since improved but the Spanish priest died.

"Three doctors are currently being administered treatment with the experimental Ebola drug ZMapp. Treatment began on Thursday evening," said Dr. Billy Johnson, chief medical officer of John F. Kennedy Medical Centre in Monrovia where two of the doctors served before contracting the deadly virus.

A second healthcare worker at the Elwa centre which is housing the sick doctors confirmed that they were on their third day of a six-day ZMapp treatment.

Details of their condition are not known.

The U.N. health agency said only around 10 to 12 doses of the drug have been made and this raises difficult ethical questions about who should get priority access.

The apparent improvement in the two U.S. healthcare workers' condition has stoked popular pressure to make the drug available to Africans - a cause advocated by the Twitter hashtag group #giveustheserum.

There is currently no vaccine against the highly-contagious disease and other forms of treatment are only designed to relieve symptoms such as fever, vomiting and haemorrhaging.

Up to 90 percent of victims die - a fatality rate so high that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classifies the illness as a category A "bioterrorism agent" - although the current outbreak fatality rate is near 60 percent.

Liberia's President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf has declared a state of emergency due to the outbreak, widely seen as the country's biggest challenge since the 1989-2003 civil war.

Health care workers fighting to stop the disease's spread in often overcrowded and ill-equipped clinics often succumb to Ebola themselves. The World Health Organization says that more than 170 healthcare workers have been infected and at least 81 have died.

U.S. President Barack Obama called Johnson-Sirleaf earlier this week to offer condolences for the country's losses and discussed control measures, Liberia said in a statement

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/08/1 ... L220140816

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 16, 2014 7:49 pm 
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Liberia gives experimental Ebola drug to three doctors, opens second treatment center in capital
New figures released on Friday showed that Liberia now has recorded more deaths — 413 — than any of the other affected countries.
By Clair MacDougall Aug. 17, 2014 | 2:35 AM

REUTERS and AP - Health care workers in Liberia have administered three doses of the rare, experimental drug ZMapp to three doctors suffering from Ebola, two medical workers in Monrovia told Reuters.

Liberia, the West African country with the highest death toll from the tropical virus at 413, received three doses of the rare serum in a special consignment this week.

Doctors Zukunis Ireland and Abraham Borbor from Liberia and Dr. Aroh Cosmos Izchukwu from Nigeria are the first Africans to receive the treatment. The drug has already been administered to two American healthcare workers and a Spanish priest, all previously working in Liberian hospitals.

The U.S. healthcare workers' health has since improved but the Spanish priest died.

"Three doctors are currently being administered treatment with the experimental Ebola drug ZMapp. Treatment began on Thursday evening," said Dr. Billy Johnson, chief medical officer of John F. Kennedy Medical Centre in Monrovia where two of the doctors served before contracting the deadly virus.

A second healthcare worker at the Elwa centre which is housing the sick doctors confirmed that they were on their third day of a six-day ZMapp treatment.

Details of their condition are not known.

The UN health agency said only around 10 to 12 doses of the drug have been made and this raises difficult ethical questions about who should get priority access.

The apparent improvement in the two U.S. healthcare workers' condition has stoked popular pressure to make the drug available to Africans - a cause advocated by the Twitter hashtag group #giveustheserum.

There is currently no vaccine against the highly-contagious disease and other forms of treatment are only designed to relieve symptoms such as fever, vomiting and haemorrhaging.

Up to 90 percent of victims die - a fatality rate so high that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classifies the illness as a category A "bioterrorism agent" - although the current outbreak fatality rate is near 60 percent.

Liberia's President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf has declared a state of emergency due to the outbreak, widely seen as the country's biggest challenge since the 1989-2003 civil war.

Health care workers fighting to stop the disease's spread in often overcrowded and ill-equipped clinics often succumb to Ebola themselves. The World Health Organization says that more than 170 healthcare workers have been infected and at least 81 have died.

U.S. President Barack Obama called Johnson-Sirleaf earlier this week to offer condolences for the country's losses and discussed control measures, Liberia said in a statement.

Liberia expands Ebola treatment in capital

Liberian authorities expanded Ebola treatment centers in the capital Saturday to cope with increasing numbers of patients, while two more airlines announced they were halting flights to the capitals of Liberia and Sierra Leone amid the deepening crisis.

Kenya Airways and regional carrier Gambia Bird join a number of other airlines in temporarily cancelling flights to avoid transmitting the disease beyond the four countries already affected in West Africa.

The Kenya Airways flights will stop as of midnight Tuesday, said Titus Naikuni, the chief executive officer of Kenya Airways. The decision was made with guidance from the country's health ministry, Naikuni said.

Gambia Bird said it had stopped flying to Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria.

"The decision has been taken in the light of international concern about the further spread of the Ebola virus in the West African sub-region, and with the aim of continuing to offer a safe and reliable service to all customers, whilst also protecting the health and well-being of passengers and crew," the statement said.

Health experts have warned that the Ebola outbreak in West Africa may last another six months. At least 1,145 people have died across Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria, and that may "vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak," the World Health Organization says.

On Saturday, a newly expanded, 34-bed Ebola treatment center was opened at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Medical Center in Monrovia, health officials said.

Assistant health minister Tolbert Nyenswah told the Associated Press the new center "will start admitting patients this evening or Monday."

Another treatment center in the southeastern outskirts of Monrovia was expanded from 80 to 120 beds. That center will eventually be further expanded to take 300 patients.

Isolating Ebola patients is critical to slowing the spread of the disease, as sick people can transmit it through their bodily fluids such as blood, sweat or urine. There is no licensed treatment or vaccine for the disease, which has killed at least half of its victims this year.

Health workers treating Ebola patients on the front lines of the crisis have borne the brunt of the fatalities. Sierra Leone's president, Ernest Bai Koroma, told journalists Friday that his country has lost two top doctors and 32 nurses.

"We need specialized clinicians and expertise and that is why we are appealing to the international community for an enhanced response to our fight against the Ebola disease," he said.

http://www.haaretz.com/1.610896

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 1:18 am 
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Has anyone seen a status on these three doctors that got the experimental protocol? Are they doing ok/getting better?

Please advise if known. thx


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 8:40 am 
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sgrondahl wrote:
Has anyone seen a status on these three doctors that got the experimental protocol? Are they doing ok/getting better?

Please advise if known. thx

MICAT Liberia ‏@MicatLiberia 10m
Min. Brown: The 3 Medical Doctors who agreed to be treated with the experimental Z-Mapp Drug are now responding to treatment.#EbolaInLiberia

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 10:58 am 
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LIBERIA: 3 RECEIVING UNTESTED EBOLA DRUG IMPROVING
By JONATHAN PAYE-LAYLEH and JOHN HEILPRIN
— Aug. 19, 2014 10:31 AM EDT

MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Three Liberian health workers receiving an experimental drug to treat Ebola are showing signs of recovery, officials said Tuesday.

The three are being treated with the last known doses of ZMapp, which had earlier been given to two infected Americans and a Spaniard. The Americans are also improving, but the Spaniard died.

"The medical professionals have informed the Liberian information ministry their progress is 'remarkable,'" the ministry said in a statement, adding that they are showing "very positive signs of recovery."

Experts have cautioned that it's unclear if ZMapp, which had never before been tested in humans, is effective. Even if it is, the California-based maker of the drug has said more supplies of the drug won't be available for months.

In the meantime, experts say the best way to stop the spread of Ebola in West Africa is to identify the sick, isolate them from the healthy and monitor everyone with whom they have been in contact.

More than 1,200 people have died from Ebola in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria in the current outbreak and more than 2,200 have been sickened, the World Health Organization said Tuesday.

Authorities have struggled to treat and isolate the sick, partially because of a fear that treatment centers are places where people go to die and a lack of confidence that officials are doing enough to protect the healthy. Many sick people have hidden in their homes, relatives have sometimes taken their loved ones away from health centers, and mobs have occasionally attacked health workers.

On Saturday, residents of the West Point slum in Liberia's capital of Monrovia attacked a center where people were being monitored for Ebola. The raid was a result of fears that people with the disease were being brought there from all over the country, the Information Ministry said Tuesday.

During the raid, dozens of people, who were waiting to be screened for Ebola, fled the facility. Looters made off with items, including bloody sheets and mattresses, that could spread the infection.

All the patients who fled are now being screened at a hospital in Monrovia and those who tested positive are being treated, the ministry said Tuesday. It was unclear how many of the 37 who fled were confirmed with Ebola. In addition, residents of the West Point slum have agreed to return any stolen items to the holding center, officials said.

Now there is a new search for a pastor who ran away from another Ebola treatment center outside Monrovia, according to the Health Ministry. The statement did not say whether the man had tested positive for Ebola, but state radio was broadcasting messages asking the public to look out for the preacher.

Still, the WHO said Tuesday that it is seeing some encouraging signs in other parts of West Africa. In Guinea people from villages that had previously rejected outside help were beginning to seek medical care, said a WHO statement. The statement said the situation is "less alarming" in Guinea than it is in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Although the outbreak began in Guinea, Liberia now has recorded the highest number of deaths and Sierra Leone the highest number of cases.

The WHO also said that there is "cautious optimism" that the spread of the virus in Nigeria can be stopped. So far, all recorded cases have been linked to one man, who flew from Liberia to Nigeria while he was already infected.

"The outbreak is not under control," the statement said, despite the encouraging signs. "As recent experience shows, progress is fragile, with a real risk that the outbreak could experience another flare-up."

In an effort to stem the spread of Ebola, officials have imposed quarantines and travel restrictions for the sick and those in contact with them, sometimes shutting off whole villages and counties.

Those restrictions are limiting access to food and other basic necessities, said the WHO. The U.N. World Food Program has said that it is preparing to deliver food to 1 million people over the next three months.

___

Heilprin reported from Geneva.
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/who-says ... -more-1200

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 11:14 am 
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Dr. Ireland Triumphantly Crosses Ebola Line
Tue, 08/19/2014 - 07:20 admin
Now Tests Negative after Contracting Ebola Virus, as JFK Staff Turnout to Welcome Him Back to ‘Life’
By:
Alaskai Moore Johnson, Observer Health Correspondent & J. Burgess Carter

Image
Dr. Ireland triumphantly walked from the isolation unit with raised hands to the delight of his well-wishers
Dr. Philip Z. Ireland on Friday, August 15, triumphantly walked from behind the fences of the Ebola isolation unit within the hospital compound of the Eternal Love Winning Africa (ELWA). As he turned the corner, he raised both hands to the delight of his family members and colleagues from the John F. Kennedy Medical Center, who had gathered at ELWA-2 isolation unit to welcome him back after crossing the deadly Ebola virus line.
Dr. Ireland was one of two Liberian Medical Doctors, for whom the "experimental drug/Serum" was brought in from the US.
According to Dr. Billy C. Johnson, Chief Medical Officer, JFK, who was on hand to receive Dr. Ireland, he told our Health Correspondent that Dr. Ireland did not use any of the serum or drug as his condition had very much improved by the time the drug arrived in the country last week for him and Dr. Abraham Borbor, Liberia's only in-country Internist.
Dr. Johnson also stated that Dr. Ireland’returning to work was up to him and would depend on how psychologically prepared he is to return to help save lives.
Both Drs. Ireland and Borbor work for the John F. Kennedy Medical Center, Liberia's biggest referral hospital in Monrovia.
Dr. Ireland's JFK colleagues had gathered in their number to welcome back a colleague, who some of them said had been resurrected from the dead. They burst into a Christian song praising God, some shouting "Thank you, Jesus!" Dr. Ireland walked out of the main withholding facility with both hands raised high, as those who had come to await him kept praising God for their son, friend, loved one, workmate and brother's revival. They had also gathered because only a few weeks ago, one of the hospital’s senior doctors, Dr. Samuel Brisbane had succumbed to the virus.
Dr. Ireland had stayed at least three weeks in the isolation center. During that period, he had turned very grey, which was not the case before he was admitted; but when he came out, his beard and hair were all very grey, with hardly a string of black hair visible on his head. One of his colleagues said his being grey was probably due to depression and worry, “because the Ebola virus kills at least 90 percent of its sufferers; and for him to be alive is by God’s miracle,” as there are no known cures for the disease.
Mr. Earnest G. Smith, a Social Worker at JFK, who volunteered to go into the isolation regularly to speak with Dr. Ireland and other patients just to help them develop the confidence that despite the condition they can recover, said it took a few days before he could get Dr. Ireland to really start speaking with him.
“Initially,” Smith said, “he was depressed. But I managed to get him to talk after few days and every time I went in, he did not want me to leave him. However, he had psychologically built his mind that he was going to recover. Now we are happy he is out,” Smith told our correspondent.
Dr. Ireland’s wife, Mrs. Rita Rose Ireland, was so overjoyed to see her husband walk from behind the zinc fence. Earlier, while preparations were going on inside the isolation unit for her husband to come out, she had told the Daily Observer that when she heard the news about her husband being “absolutely free of the virus,” she had shouted and sang praises to God. According to the doctor’s wife, for a number of days, there was no communication with her husband, and no one on the outside was telling her anything about his wellbeing even if she asked.
“That made me start to think that something bad had happened to him and no one wanted to tell me. So when I got the call that he was well and would be released I just shouted with joy and praised God for His miracle,” Mrs. Ireland said.
In a very brief chat, Dr. Ireland told our Health Correspondent that he was glad to be out.

http://www.liberianobserver.com/health/ ... ebola-line

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 6:02 pm 
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Liberia: 3 receiving untested Ebola drug improving
Posted: Aug 19, 2014 5:43 AM EDT
Updated: Aug 19, 2014 12:33 PM EDT

By JONATHAN PAYE-LAYLEH and JOHN HEILPRIN
Associated Press
MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) - Three Liberian health workers receiving an experimental drug for Ebola are showing signs of recovery, officials said Tuesday, though medical experts caution it is not certain if the drug is effective.

The World Health Organization said that the death toll for West Africa's Ebola outbreak has climbed past 1,200 but that there are tentative signs that progress is being made in containing the disease.

The three Liberians are being treated with the last known doses of ZMapp, a drug that had earlier been given to two infected Americans and a Spaniard. The Americans are also improving, but the Spaniard died.

"The medical professionals have informed the Liberian information ministry their progress is 'remarkable,'" the ministry said in a statement, adding that the patients are showing "very positive signs of recovery."

http://www.wbtv.com/story/26312929/libe ... -improving

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 8:33 pm 
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19 August 2014 Last updated at 13:25 ET
Ebola crisis: Doctors in Liberia 'recovering after taking ZMapp'

Three doctors in Liberia with Ebola who started taking an experimental drug last Thursday are showing remarkable signs of improvement, a minister says.

ZMapp was first given earlier this month to two US aid workers, who were flown home for treatment from Liberia.

Ebola has no cure but the World Health Organization (WHO) has ruled that untested drugs can be used in light of the scale of outbreak in West Africa.

Since the beginning of the year, 1,229 people have died of the virus.

It is transmitted by direct contact with the body fluids of an infected person. Initial flu-like symptoms can lead to external haemorrhaging from areas such as eyes and gums, and internal bleeding which can cause organ failure.

The outbreak began in Guinea and has since spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.
Image
Map: Ebola outbreak in West Africa
Health officials in Guinea say the country has suffered a setback in its fight against the epidemic, seeing a resurgence of cases in the town of Macenta.

The BBC's Alhassan Sillah in Guinea says the town had not had any cases for two months, and the authorities had dismantled all Ebola facilities in that area.

line
Analysis: Umaru Fofana, BBC News, Sierra Leone
Fighting the myths and fear surrounding Ebola is as tough as fighting the disease itself. They range from the bizarre to the ridiculous: Some see it as the culmination of some bio warfare gone awry; others say it is a cannibalistic ritual.

In the latest flashpoint - some people in Lunsar, about 120km (74 miles) east of the capital, Freetown, say the new cases are not Ebola patients at all. In fact, they insist that witches are flying around the country in aircraft and one of these crashed causing casualties.

All this, and the notion that an Ebola patient cannot recover, have led many sick people to stay at home, hoping they have something else. This is despite the fact that about 30% of patients have recovered.

The authorities have been encouraging those who become ill to report to hospitals for testing and treatment, if needed. But as the messengers are distrusted, the message is not getting through.

line
The health authorities believe that Guineans returning from neighbouring Liberia are carrying the virus.

In Liberia, Information Minister Lewis Brown said the government only received a small number of ZMapp doses and gave them to one Nigerian and two Liberian doctors who had caught Ebola whilst helping save the lives of other victims of the virus.

Ebola awareness campaigners stage a street performances at an event in Monrovia, Liberia - 18 August 2014
Public awareness campaigns are being stepped up across the region as some people believe Ebola is a hoax
Two US missionaries who received doses of the medicine are also reportedly recovering, but a 75-year-old Spanish priest who contracted Ebola in Liberia died in Spain last week despite being given the drug.

The US pharmaceutical company that makes the drug says it has for now run out of it, so the only way to stop the current outbreak is to isolate the victims and those who have come into contact with them.

Mr Brown also said 17 suspected Ebola patients who went missing after a health centre in the capital was attacked have been found.

In Nigeria, which has had four fatal Ebola cases, health officials say five people have now recovered from the virus and have been discharged from hospital in Lagos. Another three are still being treated.

There is no vaccine or cure
Supportive care such as rehydrating patients who have diarrhoea and vomiting can help recovery
Fruit bats, a delicacy for some West Africans, are considered to be virus' natural host
line
Since the outbreak spread to Nigeria in July, when a person infected with Ebola flew from Liberia to Lagos, several airlines have stopped flights to the worst-affected countries.

Kenya's ban on people from Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone entering the East African nation comes into force on Wednesday - and Cameroon has closed its land, sea and air borders with Nigeria.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-28860204

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2014 8:39 pm 
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Ebola Outbreak: Three African Doctors Receiving Zmapp Drug Show 'Remarkable Signs of Improvement'
Lydia Smith By Lydia Smith
August 19, 2014 11:51 BST
63 9
Image
Liberian Foreign Affairs Minister Augustine Ngafuan and a porter bring boxes of an Ebola-drug ZMapp on a Delta Airlines flight from New York to Monrovia(Getty)
Three African doctors receiving the experimental Ebola ZMapp drug are showing "remarkable signs of improvement", according to Liberian officials.

Quoting a head doctor, Information Minister Lewis Brown said the patients were appearing to make good progress after receiving doses of the drug, which appears to have helped two American aid workers who were infected with the virus in late July.

The doses were administered to Zukunis Ireland and Abraham Borbor, both from Liberia, and Aroh Cosmos Izchukwu of Nigeria, as reported by Reuters.

Last week, Liberia's Minister of Foreign Affairs, Augustine Ngufuan, couriered the two boxes of Zmapp on a commercial flight from the US to Monrovia, where it was unloaded at a VIP terminal.

According to the manufacturer of the drug, Mapp Biopharmaceuticals, the current "available supply of ZMapp has been exhausted".

Yet Tolbert Nyenswah, Assistant Minister of Health and Social Welfare, said the drug could be more widely used in Liberia in the future.

"If we can save the doctors here, especially those senior medical doctors that are infected with the virus, then Liberia can be a place to do a mass trial with the drugs," he said.

ZMapp is an experimental biopharmaceutical drug comprising of genetically-engineered antibodies that boost a patient's ability to fight off the Ebola virus.

Professor Charles Arntzen, of Arizona State University, told Euro News that the drug is relatively simple: "It is three antibodies, produced in a tobacco plant, and then we grind up the tobacco plants and purify the antibodies so that they essentially look like antibodies that would come from human serum."

The drug was first tested in humans during the current 2014 West Africa Ebola virus outbreak, which has claimed the lives of 1,229 people, according to the World Health Organization.

Cases across Liberia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone and Guinea have risen to 2,240 and approximately one million people are living in quarantine zones in the four states.

ZMapp only entered animal trials a few months before this year's epidemic. Two American aid workers were the first to receive the drug after they became infected in Liberia.

Their organisation, Samaritan's Purse, managed to acquire the drug by working with Mapp Biopharmaceuticals and the US Food and Drug Administration, which has restrictions on the export of experimental drugs.

The condition of both patients is improving in a facility in Atlanta, but critics have questioned why the drug has not been administered more freely in West Africa.

One week ago, the WHO said experimental, unlicensed drugs and vaccines can ethically be used in the Ebola outbreak in west Africa, but recognised it will take months to manufacture enough of the drug to be administered widely.
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/ebola-outbreak ... nt-1461744

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