Rhiza Labs FluTracker Forum

The place to discuss the flu
It is currently Sun Oct 22, 2017 6:54 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
WHO put out an Ebola update today, noting that reports from the field indicated the number of cases and deaths were "vastly underestimated".

http://www.who.int/csr/disease/ebola/ov ... 140814/en/

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Staff at the outbreak sites see evidence that the numbers of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak.

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
WHO Ebola news

14 August 2014

The outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa continues to escalate, with 1975 cases and 1069 deaths reported from Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone.

No new cases have been detected in Nigeria following the importation of a case in an air traveller last month. Extensive contact tracing and monitoring, implemented with support from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), has kept the number of additional cases small.

Elsewhere, the outbreak is expected to continue for some time. WHO’s operational response plan extends over the next several months. Staff at the outbreak sites see evidence that the numbers of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak.

WHO is coordinating a massive scaling up of the international response, marshalling support from individual countries, disease control agencies, agencies within the United Nations system, and others.

The World Food Programme is using its well-developed logistics to deliver food to the more than one million people locked down in the quarantine zones, where the borders of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone intersect. Several countries have agreed to support the provision of priority food staples for this population.

Practical on-the-ground intelligence is the backbone of a coordinated response. WHO is mapping the outbreak, in great detail, to pinpoint areas of ongoing transmission and locate treatment facilities and supplies. Good logistical support depends on knowing which facilities need disinfectants or personal protective equipment, where new isolation facilities need to be built, and where the need for more health-care workers is most intense.

CDC is equipping the hardest-hit countries with computer hardware and software that will soon allow real-time reporting of cases and analysis of trends. This also strengthens the framework for a scaled-up response.

Today, WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan held discussions with a group of ambassadors from Geneva’s United Nations missions. The meeting aimed to identify the most urgent needs within countries and match them with rapid international support.

These steps align with recognition of the extraordinary measures needed, on a massive scale, to contain the outbreak in settings characterized by extreme poverty, dysfunctional health systems, a severe shortage of doctors, and rampant fear.

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Ebola Numbers Vastly Underestimate Reach Of Outbreak, WHO Says
by DANA FARRINGTON
August 14, 2014 8:29 PM ET
Image
A man lies in a newly opened Ebola isolation center in a closed school in Monrovia, Liberia on Thursday. The official death toll of 1,000 people in four countries is likely below the actual number, the World Health Organization says.


The official count of Ebola cases and deaths may "vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak," the World Health Organization posted on its website.

The latest numbers from the WHO are 1,975 cases — with 1,069 deaths — from Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.

But, as NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff reports, WHO staff "say they're seeing evidence that the death toll and number of infections is much larger than these official counts."

The organization says it is "coordinating a massive scaling up of the international response." The WHO has already called the outbreak a global health emergency. As Goats and Soda reported Friday, WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan said that declaration was "a clear call for international solidarity."

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/201 ... k-who-says

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Evidence suggests Ebola toll vastly underestimated: WHO
Reuters
By By Saliou Samb

CONAKRY (Reuters) - Staff with the World Health Organisation battling an Ebola outbreak in West Africa see evidence the numbers of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimates the scale of the outbreak, the U.N. agency said on its website on Thursday.

The death toll from the world's worst outbreak of Ebola stood on Wednesday at 1,069 from 1,975 confirmed, probable and suspected cases, the agency said. The majority were in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, while four people have died in Nigeria.

The agency's apparent acknowledgement the situation is worse than previously thought could spur governments and aid organisations to take stronger measures against the virus.

"Staff at the outbreak sites see evidence that the numbers of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak," the organisation said on its website.

"WHO is coordinating a massive scaling up of the international response, marshalling support from individual countries, disease control agencies, agencies within the United Nations system, and others."

International agencies are looking into emergency food drops and truck convoys to reach hungry people in Liberia and Sierra Leone cordoned off from the outside world to halt the spread of the virus, a top World Bank official said.

In the latest sign of action by West African governments, Guinea has declared a public health emergency and is sending health workers to all affected border points, an official said.

An estimated 377 people have died in Guinea since the outbreak began in March in remote parts of a border region near Sierra Leone and Liberia.

Guinea says its outbreak is under control with the numbers of new cases falling, but the measures are needed to prevent new infections from neighbouring countries.

View galleryA woman stands at a pharmacy next to a poster displaying …
A woman stands at a pharmacy next to a poster displaying a government message against Ebola, at a ma …
"Trucks full of health materials and carrying health personnel are going to all the border points with Liberia and Sierra Leone," Aboubacar Sidiki Diakité, president of Guinea's Ebola commission, said late on Wednesday.

As many as 3,000 people are waiting at 17 border points for a green light to enter the country, he said.

"Any who are sick will be immediately isolated. People will be followed up on. We can't take the risk of letting everyone through without checks."

Sierra Leone has declared Ebola a national emergency as has Liberia, which is hoping that two of its doctors diagnosed with Ebola can start treatment with some of the limited supply of experimental drug ZMapp.

Canada's Tekmira Pharmaceuticals Corp is also exploring making more of its experimental Ebola treatment, Chief Executive Officer Mark Murray said.

Nigeria also has declared a national emergency, although it has so far escaped the levels of infection seen in the three other countries.

JUST ONE VEHICLE

Health experts say government responses to the disease need to be calibrated to prevent its spread, while avoiding measures that could induce panic or damage economies unnecessarily.

That task is harder because health services have been stretched to the breaking point and mistrust of health workers among some rural communities is high. In addition, 170 healthcare workers have been infected and 81 have died.

View galleryNurses talk near a poster displaying a government message …
Nurses talk near a poster (C) displaying a government message against Ebola, at a maternity hospital …
A Liberian government document seen by Reuters shows the strain on its health ministry as it confronts the emergency.

An Ebola call centre in Monrovia is struggling to keep up with the volume and needs more staff, telephone lines and a deputy supervisor, the Ministry of Health document said.

"The case investigation team only has one vehicle so they can't get out and then there's the issue of no space at the ETU (Ebola Treatment Unit) to bring patients," it said.

Ebola is one of the world's most deadly diseases and kills the majority of those infected. Its symptoms include internal and external bleeding, diarrhoea and vomiting.

The U.S. State Department ordered family members at its embassy in Freetown to depart Sierra Leone because of limitations on regular medical care as a result of the outbreak.

U.S. President Barack Obama has discussed the outbreak with the presidents of Liberia and Sierra Leone, the White House said.

ECONOMIC IMPACT

Ebola also holds economic ramifications for some West African states as disruption to commerce, transport and borders lasts at least another month, said Matt Robinson, a vice president at Moody's ratings agency.

Among the signs of the regional economic impact, Ivory Coast will not allow any ships from Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia to enter its port at Abidjan, according to a port statement.

Fewer passengers are arriving at Ivory Coast's main airport from Freetown, Conakry and Monrovia because of the virus leading to a shortfall of about 4,000 passengers a month, Abdoulaye Coulibaly, chairman of Air Cote d'Ivoire, told Reuters.

Ivory Coast and its eastern neighbour, Ghana, have recorded no cases of Ebola. Ghana's government said it would step up its funding for preventative health and impose a moratorium on international conferences for three months as a precaution.

Beyond the immediate impact, Africa faces a problem of perception over Ebola, even though many countries are remote geographically, economically and culturally from those suffering the outbreak.

In one example, Korean Air Lines Co Ltd said it will suspend flights to and from Nairobi, Kenya, from Aug. 20 to prevent the spread of the virus.

Kenya Airways Inc said it will continue its flights to Monrovia and Freetown. Kenyan Transport Minister Michael Kamau told a news conference the Korean Air decision may have been based on a WHO statement that Kenya should be classed as high risk of Ebola because of those direct flights.

"The statement by WHO yesterday was regrettable. It was retracted," he said.

There was no immediate comment from WHO.

(Additional reporting by Rod Nickel in Winnipeg, Anuradha Raghu in Kuala Lumpur, Emma Farge in Dakar, Se Young Lee in Seoul, Loucoumane Coulibaly in Abidjan, Mark Felsenthal, Stella Dawson and Arshad Mohammed in Washington, Pascal Fletcher in Johannesburg, Duncan Miriri in Nairobi, Camillus Eboh in Abuja and Clair MacDougall in Monrovia; Writing by Matthew Mpoke Bigg; Editing by Andre Grenon)

http://news.yahoo.com/evidence-suggests ... nance.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
WHO: Ebola Toll May 'Vastly Underestimate' Crisis
MONROVIA, Liberia — Aug 14, 2014, 7:39 PM ET
By JONATHAN PAYE-LAYLEH and SARAH DiLORENZO
Associated Press

Image
There is evidence the numbers of dead and sickened by Ebola in West Africa may "vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak," the World Health Organization said Thursday. The U.N. health agency said it was prepared for the crisis to continue for months.

With more than 1,060 deaths and 1,975 sickened, the Ebola outbreak is already the deadliest ever.

Liberian officials faced a difficult choice Thursday: deciding which handful of Ebola patients will receive an experimental drug that could prove life-saving, ineffective or even harmful.

ZMapp, the untested Ebola drug, arrived in the West African country late Wednesday. A day later, no one had yet received the treatment, which officials said would go to three people.

The outbreak, which was first identified in March in Guinea and since spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria, has overwhelmed the already strained health systems in West Africa and raised questions about whether authorities are doing enough to respond.

There is no licensed treatment for Ebola, a virus transmitted by contact with bodily fluids, so doctors have turned to the limited supply of untested drugs to treat some cases.

The Liberian government had previously said two doctors would receive ZMapp, but it was unclear who else would. Information Minister Lewis Brown said Thursday it would probably be another health care worker.

These are the last known doses of ZMapp left. The San Diego-based company that developed it has said it will take months to build up even a modest supply.

The outbreak has sparked an international debate over the ethics of giving such untested drugs to the sick and of deciding who should get the drugs. So far, only two Americans and one Spaniard have received ZMapp. The Americans are improving — but it is unclear what role the drug has played. The Spaniard died within days.

Now Liberian officials are facing those questions. In this outbreak, over 50 percent of those sickened with Ebola have died, according to the U.N. health agency.

"The criteria of selection is difficult, but it is going to be done," said Dr. Moses Massaquoi, who helped Liberia obtain the drug from Mapp Biopharmaceutical. "We are going to look at how critical people are. We are definitely going to be focusing on medical staff."

He added people past the "critical phase" who looked likely to survive would not be chosen.

Massaquoi said there was only enough of the drug to treat three people. Treatment will be staggered, so doctors can observe the effects in one patient before moving on to the next. Late Thursday, he said the treatment had not yet started.

Arthur Caplan, director of medical ethics at NYU Langone Medical Center, said the choice of who to treat would have to balance helping the largest number of people with learning the most from the treatments.

He said the question is not "whose life do we save?" but "who gets the chance to be experimented on?"

For that reason, recipients need to be good experimental subjects — people who have recently contracted the disease and are more likely to respond to treatment or perhaps younger patients, he said. In order to study the long-term effects, doctors will likely prefer people who can be observed for months, which might eliminate those living in remote places, he added.

Meanwhile, the U.S. State Department ordered families of embassy personnel to leave Sierra Leone on Thursday because of concerns that the crisis would make it difficult to get treatment for even routine health problems.

President Barack Obama spoke by phone Thursday about the Ebola outbreak with Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and in another call with President Ernest Bai Koroma of Sierra Leone. The White House said Obama expressed his condolences for the hundreds who have died in both countries and underscored the U.S.'s commitment to work with West African nations and U.N. agencies to contain the outbreak.

Also, Nigeria announced Thursday that another person had died from Ebola, bringing the country's death toll to four. The Health Ministry said the person was a nurse who helped treat the country's first Ebola case, Liberian-American Patrick Sawyer who flew in last month and died.

The ministry corrected its total number Ebola cases to 10 instead of 11 as it had reported earlier in the day.

———

DiLorenzo reported from Dakar, Senegal. Wade Williams and Abbas Dulleh in Monrovia, Liberia; Bashir Adigun in Abuja, Nigeria and Darlene Superville in Washington contributed to this report.

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 11:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
WHO: Ebola death toll 'vastly underestimated'
Though more than 1,000 people have died in the world's worst ever outbreak, the UN now says that number may be higher.
Last updated: 15 Aug 2014 02:39

Staff with the World Health Organisation battling an Ebola outbreak in West Africa see evidence the numbers of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimates the scale of the outbreak, the UN agency has said on its website.

Staff at the outbreak sites see evidence that the numbers of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak.

WHO

The death toll from the world's worst outbreak of Ebola stood on Wednesday at 1,069 from 1,975 confirmed, probable and suspected cases, the agency said. The majority were in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, while four people have died in Nigeria.

The agency's apparent acknowledgement the situation is worse than previously thought could spur governments and aid organisations to take stronger measures against the virus.

"Staff at the outbreak sites see evidence that the numbers of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak," the organisation said.

"WHO is coordinating a massive scaling up of the international response, marshalling support from individual countries, disease control agencies, agencies within the United Nations system, and others."

International agencies are looking into emergency food drops and truck convoys to reach hungry people in Liberia and Sierra Leone cordoned off from the outside world to halt the spread of the virus, a top World Bank official said.

In the latest sign of action by West African governments, Guinea has declared a public health emergency and is sending health workers to all affected border points, an official said.

An estimated 377 people have died in Guinea since the outbreak began in March in remote parts of a border region near Sierra Leone and Liberia.

Guinea says its outbreak is under control with the numbers of new cases falling, but the measures are needed to prevent new infections from neighbouring countries.

"Trucks full of health materials and carrying health personnel are going to all the border points with Liberia and Sierra Leone," Aboubacar Sidiki Diakit president of Guinea's Ebola commission, said late on Wednesday.

As many as 3,000 people are waiting at 17 border points for a green light to enter the country, he said.

"Any people who are sick will be immediately isolated. People will be followed up on. We can't take the risk of letting everyone through without checks."

Experimental drugs

Sierra Leone has declared Ebola a national emergency as has Liberia, which is hoping that two of its doctors diagnosed with Ebola can start treatment with some of the limited supply of experimental drug ZMapp.

Canada's Tekmira Pharmaceuticals Corp is also exploring making more of its experimental Ebola treatment, Chief Executive Officer Mark Murray said.

Nigeria also has declared a national emergency, although it has so far escaped the levels of infection seen in the three other countries.

Ebola is one of the world's most deadly diseases and kills the majority of those infected. Its symptoms include internal and external bleeding, diarrhoea and vomiting.

The US State Department ordered family members at its embassy in Freetown to depart Sierra Leone because of limitations on regular medical care as a result of the outbreak.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/20 ... 27938.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 11:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Aug 15, 2014 03:40 By Chris Richards
The current outbreak, which began in Guinea in February and has so far killed 1,069 people, is expected to continue "for some time," according to the WHO

The scale of the Ebola crisis has been "vastly underestimated", according to the United Nations' health agency,

The World Health Organization said "extraordinary measures" were needed to tackle the outbreak, which has killed 1,069 people.

The WHO added its staff had seen evidence that the numbers of reported cases and deaths do not reflect the scale of the crisis.

The current outbreak began in Guinea in February.

It has since spread to Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria.

About 60 per cent of those infected in this outbreak have died.

The WHO said the outbreak was expected to continue "for some time," adding: "WHO is co-ordinating a massive scaling up of the international response."

Ebola causes severe dehydration through vomiting, bleeding and diarrhoea.

There is no cure and no vaccine to stop infection.



http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news ... z3AQgNLB3D
Follow us: @DailyMirror on Twitter | DailyMirror on Facebook

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 7:23 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
WHO: Evidence shows Ebola crisis 'vastly' underestimated
By Faith Karimi, CNN
updated 6:33 AM EDT, Fri August 15, 2014

(CNN) -- The magnitude of the Ebola crisis in West Africa is "vastly" underestimated, the World Health Organization warned this week, as the death toll steadily climbed.
Ebola has infected at least 1,975 people in Nigeria, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since the outbreak began this year.
Of the victims, 1,069 have died, according to the WHO. It said the number reflects the count as of Monday.
"The outbreak is expected to continue for some time," the WHO said in a statement Thursday. "Staff at the outbreak sites see evidence that the numbers of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak."
Husband: Ebola victim 'getting stronger' How Ebola got out of control Ebola claimed many lives in this family Dr. Gupta: Why we shouldn't fear Ebola
Though the United Nations agency did not provide an estimate of unreported cases, it said it's teaming up with the affected countries to gather more intelligence from the ground.
"WHO is mapping the outbreak, in great detail, to pinpoint areas of ongoing transmission and locate treatment facilities and supplies," the statement said.
It's also working with other agencies, including the World Food Program, to feed about 1 million people quarantined in villages in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.
"Our team are not in direct contact with Ebola quarantine and treatment centers," said Fabienne Pompey, spokeswoman for World Food Program. "We deliver food to the medical staff and they are in charge of the distribution."
As experts scramble to contain the outbreak, health officials are considering the use of experimental treatments and vaccines since no proven ones exist.
Ebola spreads through contact with organs and bodily fluids such as blood, saliva, urine and other secretions of infected people.
The deadly virus causes viral hemorrhagic fever, which affects multiple organ systems in the body.
Early symptoms include sudden onset of fever, weakness, muscle pain, headaches and a sore throat. They later progress to vomiting, diarrhea, impaired kidney and liver function, and sometimes internal and external bleeding.
Two Americans are undergoing treatment for Ebola, which they contracted while helping patients in Liberia. They were transferred to an isolation unit at an Atlanta hospital and appear to be recovering.
In a separate case, a Spanish priest who contracted the disease in Liberia died this week.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/15/health/eb ... ?hpt=hp_t2

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 7:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
West Africa: WHO - Magnitude of Ebola Virus Death Toll "Vastly Underestimated"

According to the World Health Organization, evidence suggests the death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is vastly underestimated. The UN agency said it was prepared for the crisis to continue for months.

The numbers of reported Ebola virus cases and deaths "vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak," the UN agency said on its website on Thursday.

The death toll from the world's worst outbreak of Ebola, first identified in March, has reached more than 1,060 from 1,975 confirmed, probable and suspected cases, the agency said.

The vast majority were in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia while there have also been several deaths in Nigeria.

Several airlines have suspended flights to infected countries, however the WHO has emphasized that "air travel, even from Ebola-affected countries, is low risk for Ebola transmission" because the virus is not airborne.

Meanwhile, health officials in Liberia have received doses of an experimental Ebola treatment drug from the United States called ZMapp. The drug has already been administered to two infected American aid workers. A Spanish priest who had also begun taking the experimental drug became the first European to succumb to the virus this year when he died on Tuesday.

The highly contagious virus is a form of hemorrhagic fever that can cause severe fever, unstoppable bleeding and organ failure. There is no Ebola vaccine.

hc/lw (AFP, Reuters, AP, dpa)
http://allafrica.com/stories/201408150306.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 63 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group