Rhiza Labs FluTracker Forum

The place to discuss the flu
It is currently Wed Oct 18, 2017 2:21 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 10:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Media reports cite the Ebola death of Dr Modupeh Cole in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 10:33 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
S.Leone Ebola doctor dies as W.Africa awaits experimental drugs

Modupeh Cole, the senior physician in the capital Freetown who was confirmed dead from Ebola, had been "instrumental in the fight against the Ebola virus"

Rod Mac Johnson and Frankie Taggart with Zoom Dosso in Monrovia, Agence France-Presse

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone – A second senior doctor in Sierra Leone was confirmed dead from Ebola on Wednesday, August 13, as west Africa anxiously awaited the arrival of experimental drugs to tackle the deadliest-ever outbreak of the virus.

Sierre Leone's chief medical officer Brima Kargbo said Modupeh Cole, a senior physician in the capital Freetown, had been "instrumental in the fight against the Ebola virus".

Cole's death came only a fortnight after the country's only virologist and leading Ebola expert, Umar Khan, succumbed to the tropical disease.

Another of the worst-hit countries, Liberia, is scrambling to save two of its own infected doctors and hopes an experimental serum from the United States will arrive in time.

The presidency said Tuesday it had received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration for the use of a barely-tested ZMapp treatment that has shown positive early results.

The two infected doctors have given their written consent to try the drug, which will be delivered to the country within 48 hours. A third doctor has already died from the virus.

The World Health Organization declared Tuesday it was ethical to try largely untested treatments "in the special circumstances of this Ebola outbreak".

The company behind ZMapp said it had sent all its available supplies to the region following an outcry over the fact it had so far only been used on Westerners, but supplies are extremely limited.

'We are all scared'

Germany on Wednesday called on its nationals to leave the three worst-hit countries -- Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone -- although it said it was keeping its embassies open.

UN chief Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday announced plans to step up the global response while urging governments to "avoid panic and fear" over a preventable disease.

His comments came after Sierra Leone President Ernest Bai Koroma expressed his "utter dismay" at the "slow pace" of the international community in responding to the outbreak.

In Freetown, the tropical fever is the only topic of conversation.

"We are all scared because of the way Ebola is spreading but we are taking all the necessary precautions," says Waisu Gassama, 27, who works in the HIV department of the dilapidated, century-old Connaught Hospital.

Outside the hospital, soldiers say they have been drafted in to guard doctors and nurses, many of whom have been targeted by angry mobs blaming modern medicine for exacerbating the epidemic.

The epidemic, the worst since Ebola was first discovered four decades ago in what was then Zaire, has killed over 1,000 people since early this year, the WHO said.

West African regional bloc ECOWAS said one of its officials had died from the disease in Nigeria, taking the total number of deaths in the country to three.

Cases have so far been limited to Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, which account for the bulk of victims, and Nigeria.

Terror has gripped the impoverished west African countries, with harrowing tales emerging of people being shunned by their villages as the virus fells those around them.

When AFP visited the Liberian village of Ballajah, some 150 kilometres (90 miles) from the capital Monrovia, 12-year-old Fatu Sherrif had been locked away with her mother's body without food and water for a week.

Her cries went unanswered as panicked residents fled the village when both her parents fell sick.

Fatu later died and her brother Barnie, 15, despite testing negative for Ebola, was left alone and hungry in an abandoned house.

"Nobody wants to come near me and they know -- people told them that I don't have Ebola," he told Agence France-Presse.

Promising vaccines

Although hopes have been heaped on the ZMapp treatment, it exists in such small quantities that only a handful of victims are likely to get access in the short term.

Its effectiveness is also far from proven, having only previously been tested on monkeys.

It appears to have had a positive effect on two US aid workers infected in Liberia, but an elderly Spanish priest also infected in the country, died in a Madrid hospital Tuesday despite being treated with ZMapp.

There is currently no available cure or vaccine for Ebola, which the WHO has declared a global public health emergency, and the use of experimental drugs has stoked a fierce ethical debate.

Sierra Leone's health ministry spokesman Sidi Yahya Tunis told Agence France-Presse the country had officially requested a shipment of the serum.

While the stock of ZMapp in the US has been exhausted for now, WHO assistant director general Marie-Paule Kieny stressed there were other "potential therapies and vaccines... considered very serious alternatives" and that two possible vaccines were moving rapidly towards clinical trials.

She said plenty of drugs had been developed "to a point", but companies had not footed the bill for expensive clinical trials as the virus was "typically a disease of poor people in poor countries where there is no market". – Rappler.com

http://www.rappler.com/world/regions/af ... octor-dies

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 10:45 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
An official in Sierra Leone says another of the country's leading physicians has died from Ebola.

Ebola has killed more than 1,000 people in a West African outbreak that has also hit Guinea, Liberia and Nigeria. Many of the dead are health workers, who are often working with inadequate supplies and protection.

Sidie Yayah Tunis, director of communications for the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, announced that Modupeh Cole died Wednesday. The U.S.-trained Cole was one of the lead doctors working in the Ebola isolation ward in Connaught Hospital in Freetown, the capital.

Cole's death comes on the heels of that of another physician who was leading Sierra Leone's fight against Ebola, Sheik Humarr Khan.

Officials at the World Health Organization say they considered giving Khan an experimental Ebola drug but decided against it. The drug was later given to three Westerners.

Ebola experimental drugs and vaccines in early days of testing
Khan, who died on July 29, caught Ebola after leading Sierra Leone's fight against it.

In an email to The Associated Press on Wednesday, WHO said Khan's doctors considered administering an untested drug, ZMapp, but decided against it. WHO tried to airlift Khan out of the country, but "his condition had deteriorated too much to be transported safely."

The revelation that the drug had been considered for an African doctor was first reported in The New York Times on Tuesday.

Two Americans who are still alive and a Spanish priest who died were treated with ZMapp.

Research on the experimental Ebola drug was jointly conducted in Canada and the U.S.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/ebola-kil ... it&cmp=rss

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 10:47 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Sierra Leone: Another top doctor dies from Ebola
Associated Press By CLARENCE ROY-MACAULAY and MARIA CHENG
24 minutes ago

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — A leading physician in Sierra Leone's fight against Ebola has died from the disease, an official said Wednesday, as it emerged that another top doctor had been considered to receive an experimental drug but did not get it and later died.

Ebola has killed more than 1,000 people in the current West African outbreak that has also hit Guinea, Liberia and Nigeria. Many of the dead are health workers, who are often working with inadequate supplies and protection. But despite the large number of deaths and infections among Africans, only two Americans and a Spaniard have received ZMapp, the unproven and experimental anti-Ebola drug made in the United States. That has stoked debate about ethics on who should be given the limited experimental treatment.

Doctors considered giving ZMapp to Sheik Humarr Khan, the chief doctor treating Ebola in Sierra Leone who had come down with the dreaded disease, but eventually decided against it, officials at the World Health Organization said in an email to The Associated Press on Wednesday.

WHO then tried to airlift Khan out of the country, but "his condition had deteriorated too much to be transported safely." He died July 29.

Doses of ZMapp for two Liberian doctors could arrive as soon as Wednesday in Liberia, according to Liberian Health Minister Walter Gwenigale. They would be the first Africans known to receive the treatment.

The California-based company that makes the drug, Mapp Pharmaceuticals, has said that its supplies are now exhausted, and it would take months to make even a modest amount.

Canada announced Tuesday it would donate 800 to 1,000 doses of its experimental Ebola vaccine developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada to the World Health Organization.

"The trouble is, of course, with this very, very limited number of vaccines, who would you give that to?" said Dr. Gregory Taylor, deputy head of the agency.

He said the agency has been advised that it makes the most sense to give the vaccine to health care workers in Africa who are among the most vulnerable because of their close contact with Ebola patients

Meanwhile, yet another doctor in Sierra Leone, Modupeh Cole, died on Wednesday, according to Sidie Yayah Tunis, director of communications for the Ministry of Health and Sanitation. Cole, trained in the U.S., was one of the top doctors working in the Ebola isolation ward in Connaught Hospital in Freetown, the capital. He tested positive for the disease last week and was transferred to the eastern district of Kailahun, where Doctors Without Borders is running a treatment center.

Cole's sickness spread fear throughout the hospital where he worked, and staff there went on strike Friday and Saturday after learning that he had tested positive for the deadly disease. They returned to work on Sunday.

Both Cole's and Khan's deaths are a major blow to Sierra Leone's health system, which is struggling to cope with the deadly outbreak.

The outbreak, which was first identified in March in Guinea, has strained the resources of the poor West African countries it has hit and of the international community, which is struggling to mobilize enough qualified doctors.

There is no known cure or licensed treatment for Ebola.

___

Cheng reported from London. Associated Press writer Jonathan Paye-Layleh contributed from Monrovia, Liberia.

http://news.yahoo.com/considered-ebola- ... 16817.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 11:01 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
LONDON. One of the doctors who led the campaign against Ebola in Sierra Leone has died of the disease, an official said. Sidie Yayah Tunis, communications director for the Ministry of Health and Sanitation, said Dr. Modupeh Cole died Wednesday. The doctor, trained in the United States, worked in the Ebola isolation ward of the Connaught Hospital in Freetown, the capital. of Cole's death came shortly after another doctor, Humarr Sheik Khan, who led the fight against Ebola in Liberia.

Officials of the World Health Organization said that Khan had studied supply ZMapp the experimental drug, but decided not to. WHO Khan had tried to pull the country by plane, but "his condition had deteriorated to the point that not I could safely carry. " The New York Times was the first to report that envisaged deliver the drug to an African doctor, ZMapp was applied to two Americans, still living and a Spanish priest, who died. The virus Ebola has killed more than 300 thousand people in an outbreak that also affects Guinea, Liberia and Nigeria in West Africa. Many of the dead are health workers who lack adequate supplies and protection.

http://www.elfinanciero.com.mx/mundo/mu ... witterfeed

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 7:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Ebola Claims Another Sierra Leone Doctor
By ADAM NOSSITERAUG. 13, 2014

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone — A second leading Sierra Leone doctor has succumbed to the Ebola epidemic sweeping across West Africa, dealing another blow to the country’s faltering efforts to stem the disease.

Dr. Modupeh Cole, 56, died Wednesday at the Ebola treatment center operated by Doctors Without Borders in the northeastern town of Kailahun, officials at the health ministry said.

He had apparently been infected while seeing a patient at the country’s leading hospital, Connaught Hospital, here in the capital, officials said. The patient later tested positive for Ebola.

The loss of Dr. Cole was described as significant by health officials in a country with a severe shortage of well-trained doctors, especially coming two weeks after the death of Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan, the virologist who was leading the fight against the disease in eastern Sierra Leone, where it has flourished.

Continue reading the main story

Dr. Cole “was a highly qualified physician, and we have very few of them on hand,” said Dr. Amara Jambai, director of prevention and control at the health ministry. “You can imagine what this does to the younger cohort. It’s like having a general falling in battle. It just brings more misery. It’s not good. When you have a health system that’s constrained, it’s a bit too much.”

Connaught, where Dr. Cole worked, is Sierra Leone’s leading referral hospital, so Ebola patients inevitably go there, initially at least. But it does not have a treatment center for them or an isolation ward.

It was one such patient who apparently passed the deadly disease to the doctor. “He was trying to see a patient, and the patient was falling,” Dr. Jambai said. “The patient was trying to help himself to the couch, and the patient fell.” The patient was positive for Ebola, he added.

Dr. Cole trained in the Soviet Union in the 1980s before returning to Sierra Leone in 1987, Dr. Jambai said.

The disease continues to spread, with the World Health Organization reporting 1,013 deaths across four countries — Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone — as of Saturday. Sierra Leone reported the most confirmed and probable cases, 730, and the third-highest death toll, 315. Health workers suspect that this figure may be far too low, given the number of confirmed Ebola cases in the country, 656.

On Tuesday, some of the rare experimental Ebola drug known as ZMapp arrived in Liberia. The minister of foreign affairs, Augustine Ngafuan, transported three courses of the drug himself on a commercial flight from the United States. The Liberian government had announced that two courses would be administered to two doctors from John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Monrovia, the Liberian capital.


A report in The New England Journal of Medicine traces the spread of the recent Ebola outbreak from Guéckédou, Guinea, to towns nearby.


The suspected first case, a 2-year-old child living in Meliandou Village, Guéckédou, dies after being sick for four days.
A health care worker from Guéckédou hospital dies at Macenta hospital after being sick for five days.
A relative of the Macenta hospital doctor dies in Nzérékoré.

A doctor at Macenta hospital who treated the health care worker dies. His funeral is held in Kissidougou.

MARCH 7 AND 8, 2014
The child’s sister, mother and grandmother die. The village midwife is hospitalized in Guéckédou and also dies.
Two of the Macenta doctor’s brothers die in Kissidougou.

But Dr. Moses Massaquoi, a health ministry official, said in a telephone interview that “things have changed,” adding that the medication would be administered to health workers, among them a doctor and a nurse, without specifying. Health officials also emphasized that the very limited courses of the medication, which is unproven and virtually untested, were not a panacea.

Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story
“For me this is not the answer; it’s just a matter of trial,” said Tolbert Nyenswah, the assistant minister of health. “We need to continue mechanisms to break transmission so that we can eradicate this disease.”

A third death in Nigeria was reported by the Economic Community of West African States, a regional bloc, which said Tuesday that Jatto Asihu Abdulqudir, a staff member in Lagos, had succumbed to the disease. Mr. Abdulqudir was among those who assisted an infected Liberian-American who had arrived by plane for a conference in July. The passenger, Patrick Sawyer, died on July 25, and a nurse who treated him died shortly after.

Nigerian media reported Wednesday that officials were concerned about the spread of the disease beyond Lagos, with 21 people being placed under quarantine in the southeastern city of Enugu. They were reported to have had contact with a nurse who treated Mr. Sawyer.

In Nigeria, the outbreak still appears relatively contained, with 10 confirmed cases and 198 people being watched in Lagos and Enugu, according to Liberian media reports. In Sierra Leone, by contrast, a substantial portion of the nation is under quarantine by the government, and the number of cases, and deaths, keeps growing.

“When figures have names, that is when reality sinks in,” Dr. Jambai said. “It’s a very sad day.”

Clair MacDougall contributed from Monrovia, Liberia.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/14/world ... times&_r=0

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 10:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Another top doctor dies from Ebola

The news came as it emerged that another top doctor had been considered to receive an experimental drug but did not get it and later died.

Ebola has killed more than 1,000 people in the current West African outbreak that has also hit Guinea, Liberia and Nigeria.

Many of the dead are health workers, who are often working with inadequate supplies and protection.

But despite the large number of deaths and infections among Africans, only two Americans and a Spaniard have received ZMapp, the unproven and experimental anti-Ebola drug made in the United States. That has stoked debate about ethics on who should be given the limited experimental treatment.

Doctors considered giving ZMapp to Sheik Humarr Khan, the chief doctor treating Ebola in Sierra Leone who had come down with the dreaded disease, but eventually decided against it, officials at the World Health Organisation (WHO) said.

WHO then tried to airlift Dr Khan out of the country, but "his condition had deteriorated too much to be transported safely". He died on July 29.


Doses of ZMapp for two Liberian doctors could arrive as soon as today in Liberia, according to the country's health minister Walter Gwenigale. They would be the first Africans known to receive the treatment.

The company that makes the drug, Mapp Pharmaceuticals, has said that its supplies are now exhausted, and it would take months to make even a modest amount.

Canada announced yesterday it would donate 800 to 1,000 doses of its experimental Ebola vaccine developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada to the WHO.

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/ ... 06148.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 3:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
(Reuters) - The United States said on Thursday it had ordered family members at the U.S. Embassy in Freetown, Sierra Leone to depart because of limitations on regular medical care as a result of the Ebola outbreak.

"The Embassy recommended this step out of an abundance of caution, following the determination by the Department’s Medical Office that there is a lack of options for routine health care services at major medical facilities due to the Ebola outbreak," the State Department said in a statement.

(Reporting By Arshad Mohammed; Editing by Susan Heavey)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/08/ ... ce=twitter

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 7:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
WHO pushes back against Ebola-related flight bans
Filed Under: Ebola
Lisa Schnirring | Staff Writer | CIDRAP News | Aug 14, 2014

With some airlines suspending flights to West Africa's Ebola outbreak region, the World Health Organization (WHO) today restated its position that the risk of disease transmission during air travel remains low, as a few doses of an investigational drug reached Africa.

Korean Air Lines (KAL) announced today that it would suspend flights to Nairobi, Kenya, starting Aug 20 to prevent the spread of Ebola virus disease (EVD), according to a report today from Reuters. KAL operates three return flights from Nairobi each week. Kenya has not reported any Ebola cases and does not border the affected area, though the WHO has urged it to take extra precautions, given the volume of travel between it and the outbreak countries.

Earlier this month, British Airways said it was suspending service to Liberia and Sierra Leone because of the EVD outbreak. Emirates Airlines, based in Dubai, has also suspended flights to Guinea.

So far, only one travel-related illness has been detected, in an airline passenger from Liberia who was sick upon his arrival in Nigeria, an event that sparked a transmission chain in the capital, Lagos. However, some airlines are concerned about the safety of passengers and staff who might need to seek care in a medical facility in outbreak countries.

WHO repeats advice against flight suspensions
Isabelle Nuttall, MD, director of the WHO Global Capacity Alert and Response, said in a WHO statement today that unlike flu and tuberculosis, Ebola doesn't spread through the air. "It can only be transmitted by direct contact with the body fluids of a person who is sick with the disease."

The WHO added that on the small chance that someone on a plane is sick with Ebola, the likelihood of other passengers and crew having contact with their body fluids is even smaller. Typically, when a person is sick with Ebola, they are so unwell that they can't travel. Health experts also say people who are infected with Ebola can't shed the virus until they have symptoms.

Last week the WHO's emergency committee on Ebola said the outbreak developments in West Africa qualify as a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC), and it recommended a set of measures to curb the spread of the disease. The panel urged no bans on international travel or trade and that countries make sure they have the capacity to identify and care for travelers from Ebola-affected areas who arrive at travel hubs or destinations with unexplained fevers or other symptoms.

On its Twitter account today, the WHO said international airlines in affected countries are putting systems in place to screen passengers for possible infections. Global health officials have said exit screening in outbreak countries is likely to be more effective for flagging illnesses than entry screening in destination countries, because nonstop flights from African countries aren't the most common route, and it's more difficult to track passengers when they take multi-leg flights.

The WHO also tweeted that it is disappointed when airlines stop flying to West Africa: "Hard to save lives if we and other health workers cannot get in." (??)

Treatment, vaccine developments
In treatment developments, the first three doses of the experimental drug Zmapp arrived in Liberia last night, with two of them earmarked for two of the country's doctors who are in an isolation center at a hospital in Monrovia, the capital, AllAfrica reported today.

A Liberian health official said the government negotiated with the company, with the approval of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), to explore how the drugs could be given to the patients in Liberia. He also said negations are underway with other firms developing experimental Ebola drugs, including the Canadian company Tekmira, which makes the only Ebola treatment that has entered clinical trials.

Meanwhile, the president of NewLink Genetics Corp., which is developing an experimental Ebola vaccine based on technology developed by Canadian government researchers , said at least two contract manufacturers have been found to produce "tens of thousands" of doses in the next month or two, according to Reuters.

Charles Link, MD, told Reuters that the company's subsidiary has received funding from the US Department of Defense to speed up clinical trials and manufacturing. Canada's government recently announced that it will donate 800 to 1,000 doses of the vaccine that it has on hand to the WHO for use in battling the outbreak.

In another move that could speed development of an experimental treatment, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, based in Research Triangle Park, N.C., announced yesterday that it has received an additional $4.1 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to conduct a phase 1 clinical trial of an intramuscular treatment for Ebola and other viral hemorrhagic fever diseases.

The additional funding for the treatment, called BXC4430, will also cover studies in nonhuman primates to gauge effective dose ranges and schedules.

The NIAID made its initial grant to BioCryst , valued at up to $22 million over 5 years, in September 2013.

In other developments, the FDA today warned consumers about online companies that are selling products to prevent or treat Ebola. In a statement it said it has received consumer complaints about a variety of products.

Though Ebola vaccines and treatments are under development, in early stages with very limited supply, there are no approved products that have been tested for safety or effectiveness, the FDA noted. The agency added that by law, dietary supplements can't claim to prevent or cure disease.

The FDA also mentioned that the CDC doesn't view the outbreak as a significant threat to the US public and noted that during outbreaks, fraudulent products that purport to prevent or treat the disease often appear on the market.

Latest African developments
Guinea's government has declared a national health emergency to tamp down the spread of Ebola, BBC News reported today, based on information from Guinea's state radio. The action is meant to trigger tighter border controls, order the immediate isolation of people with suspected infections, and prevent the movement of dead bodies from one town to another.

When the WHO declared a PHEIC on Aug 8, it urged the outbreak countries to declare national emergencies. Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria had already declared national emergencies.

Sierra Leone has lost its second top doctor to EVD, Dr Modupeh Cole, who died yesterday at a Doctors Without Borders treatment center in Kailahun, the New York Times reported.

The health ministry said he was exposed to the virus while working in a hospital in Freetown, the capital, according to the Times report.

Nigerian health officials also today reported another death of a health worker, a nurse who had helped care for the country's first EVD case, a man whose illness was detected in Lagos after he had flown in from Liberia, the Associated Press (AP) reported today.



See also:

Aug 14 Reuters story

Aug 14 WHO statement

WHO Twitter feed

Aug 14 AllAfrica story

Aug 13 Reuters story

Aug 14 FDA statement

Aug 14 BBC News story

Aug 13 Times story

Aug 14 AP story
http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspect ... light-bans

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot], Yahoo [Bot] and 58 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group