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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 12:08 pm 
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WHO's latest update shows spike in cases in Liberia & Sierra Leone (71 & 53) in two days (Aug 10-11).

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2014_08_13_ebola/en/

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 12:14 pm 
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Disease update

Confirmed, probable, and suspect cases and deaths from Ebola virus disease in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone, as of 11 August 2014

New (1) Confirmed Probable Suspect Totals
Guinea
Cases 4 369 133 8 510
Deaths 4 242 133 2 377
Liberia
Cases 71 166 358 146 670
Deaths 32 149 153 53 355
Nigeria
Cases 0 10 0 2 12
Deaths 1 0 3 0 3
Sierra Leone
Cases 53 706 38 39 783
Deaths 19 295 34 5 334
Totals
Cases 128 1251 529 195 1975
Deaths 56 686 323 60 1069
(1) New cases were reported between 10 and 11 August 2014.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 12:36 pm 
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Using a Tactic Unseen in a Century, Countries Cordon Off Ebola-Racked Areas
By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.AUG. 12, 2014

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is so out of control that governments there have revived a disease-fighting tactic not used in nearly a century: the “cordon sanitaire,” in which a line is drawn around the infected area and no one is allowed out.

Cordons, common in the medieval era of the Black Death, have not been seen since the border between Poland and Russia was closed in 1918 to stop typhus from spreading west. They have the potential to become brutal and inhumane. Centuries ago, in their most extreme form, everyone within the boundaries was left to die or survive, until the outbreak ended.

Plans for the new cordon were announced on Aug. 1 at an emergency meeting in Conakry, Guinea, of the Mano River Union, a regional association of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, the three countries hardest hit by Ebola, according to Agence France-Presse. The plan was to isolate a triangular area where the three countries meet, separated only by porous borders, and where 70 percent of the cases known at that time had been found.

Troops began closing internal roads in Liberia and Sierra Leone last week. The epidemic began in southern Guinea in December, but new cases there have slowed to a trickle. In the other two countries, the number of new cases is still rapidly rising. As of Monday, the region had seen 1,848 cases and 1,013 deaths, according to the World Health Organization, although many experts think that the real count is much higher because families in remote villages are avoiding hospitals and hiding victims.

Officials at the health organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which have experts advising the countries, say the tactic could help contain the outbreak but want to see it used humanely.

“It might work,” said Dr. Martin S. Cetron, the disease center’s chief quarantine expert. “But it has a lot of potential to go poorly if it’s not done with an ethical approach. Just letting the disease burn out and considering that the price of controlling it — we don’t live in that era anymore. And as soon as cases are under control, one should dial back the restrictions.”

Experts said that any cordon must let food, water and medical care reach those inside, and that the trust of inhabitants must be won through communication with their leaders.

The phrase cordon sanitaire, or sanitary barrier, appears to date from 1821, when France sent 30,000 troops into the Pyrenees to stop a lethal fever raging in Spain from crossing the border.

In Sierra Leone, large sections of the Kailahun and Kenema districts, an area the size of Jamaica, have been cut off by military roadblocks. Soldiers check the credentials and take the temperatures of those trying to go in or out. In Liberia, similar restrictions have been imposed north of the capital, Monrovia.

How Ebola Spread
A report in The New England Journal of Medicine traces the spread of the recent Ebola outbreak from Guéckédou, Guinea, to towns nearby.


The suspected first case, a 2-year-old child living in Meliandou Village, Guéckédou, dies after being sick for four days.
A health care worker from Guéckédou hospital dies at Macenta hospital after being sick for five days.
A relative of the Macenta hospital doctor dies in Nzérékoré.

A doctor at Macenta hospital who treated the health care worker dies. His funeral is held in Kissidougou.

The child’s sister, mother and grandmother die. The village midwife is hospitalized in Guéckédou and also dies.
Two of the Macenta doctor’s brothers die in Kissidougou.


Nigeria is not involved because its small Ebola outbreak is hundreds of miles away. All 10 confirmed cases there are in Lagos, the financial capital, and all are apparently linked to a Liberian-American who arrived there on a flight and later died.

Inside the cordoned area of Sierra Leone and Liberia, alarmed residents have told reporters that they fear starving because food prices are rising. Many farmers have died, and traders who cannot travel cannot earn money.

It is not clear whether plans to deliver food, water and care are underway.

When cordons are imposed, “human rights have to be respected,” said Gregory Hartl, a spokesman for the World Health Organization, which last week declared the outbreak an international public health emergency.

The agency will work with the World Food Program and other agencies to make sure food and supplies get in, he said.

W.H.O. officials attended the Conakry meeting but did not join the Aug. 1 announcement of the planned cordon. They have not opposed it, either.

“It seems like a reflexive movement by the governments to show that they’re doing something, and since they have armies more elaborate than their health care systems, they use the army,” said Dr. William Schaffner, the head of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University’s medical school.

There have been nearly 20 Ebola outbreaks in Africa since the disease was discovered in 1976, and all previous ones were beaten by the same tactics: Teams of outside health experts, usually from Europe and the United States, flew in, recruited local health workers and set up field hospitals where all known victims were quarantined and treated. The teams also took over burials, disinfecting and bagging bodies. They traced all contacts of known victims and hospitalized any people who fell ill. Health workers protected themselves with gloves, coveralls, masks, bleach spray and the burning of used gear.

This time, however, the outbreak quickly spread among the three contiguous countries, all battered by political dysfunction and civil wars. None had seen the virus before, and the global response was initially slow and inadequate. Protective equipment quickly ran out; leading local doctors fell ill and even died, stirring panic.

Now, experts say, the epidemic is too big to control with the old tactics. Tracing contacts requires many health care workers, because any victim — especially a nurse or a market trader — could have had physical contact with dozens of people.

And health care workers are often fearful of helping people who may have Ebola. It may become necessary, Dr. Cetron suggested, to pay people within the cordon to report cases and victims’ contacts.

Before the modern era of vaccines, antibiotics and infection control, cordons sanitaires were far more common.

As louse-borne typhus swept through post-revolutionary Russia, the victors in World War I closed Poland’s eastern border. Travelers wanting to cross had to be interned, bathed, shaved and deloused, and their clothes had to be treated with steam and chemicals.

The most famous voluntary cordon, according to Joseph P. Byrne, a historian at Belmont University in Nashville, was of the English village of Eyam. In 1665, the plague reached it from London, probably in fleas on cloth shipped to a local tailor, the first to die. The village, which had about 350 people, voluntarily cordoned itself off from the spring until November to prevent the plague from spreading to the rest of Derbyshire. Grateful people from other villages left food outside a circle of stones around Eyam. Only a quarter of the village survived, but the plague did not spread.

The United States has its own history of cordons, some with racial overtones. In 1899, a 35-acre area of Honolulu housing its Chinese and Japanese residents was sealed off by the Hawaii National Guard and white vigilantes because of the plague. Workers with outside jobs had to pass through showers. Ultimately, a blaze started by the Fire Department to burn flea-infested buildings got out of control and destroyed much of the district, leaving 8,000 people homeless.

Adam Nossiter contributed reporting from Freetown, Sierra Leone.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/13/scien ... times&_r=0

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 12:45 pm 
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Ebola virus disease update - west Africa

Disease outbreak news
13 August 2014

Epidemiology and surveillance

Between 10 and 11 August 2014, a total of 128 new cases of Ebola virus disease (laboratory-confirmed, probable, and suspect cases) as well as 56 deaths were reported from Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone.

Contact tracing in Guinea, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone has resulted in a range between 94% and 98% of contacts of EVD cases being identified and followed-up. In Liberia, efforts are underway to strengthen contact tracing, but help is needed in this area. The Liberian Army has also recently placed a third province under quarantine as part of the ongoing effort to stop transmission of EVD.

Health sector response

On 11 August, WHO convened a panel of medical ethicists, scientific experts, and lay people from the affected countries to consider and assess the ethical implications for clinical decision-making of the potential use of unregistered interventions.

In the particular circumstances of this outbreak, and provided certain conditions are met, the panel reached consensus that it is ethical to offer unproven interventions with as yet unknown efficacy and adverse effects, as potential treatment or prevention.

Ethical criteria must guide the provision of such interventions. These include transparency about all aspects of care, informed consent, freedom of choice, confidentiality, respect for the person, preservation of dignity and involvement of the community.

Additional information on the outcomes of the meeting can be found at http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/sta ... ummary/en/. A report of the meeting proceedings will be available to the public by 17 August 2014.

On the operational side, WHO is finalizing its strategic operations response plan and expects to share this with countries and partners in the coming days. Mapping is also underway to develop an operational picture in order to coordinate and move people and materials to areas of greatest need.

WHO does not recommend any travel or trade restrictions be applied except in cases where individuals have been confirmed or are suspected of being infected with EVD or where individuals have had contact with cases of EVD. (Contacts do not include properly-protected health-care workers and laboratory staff.) Temporary recommendations from the Emergency Committee with regard to actions to be taken by countries can be found at http://who.int/mediacentre/news/stateme ... 140808/en/.

Disease update

Confirmed, probable, and suspect cases and deaths from Ebola virus disease in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone, as of 11 August 2014

New (1) Confirmed Probable Suspect Totals
Guinea
Cases 4 369 133 8 510
Deaths 4 242 133 2 377
Liberia
Cases 71 166 358 146 670
Deaths 32 149 153 53 355
Nigeria
Cases 0 10 0 2 12
Deaths 1 0 3 0 3
Sierra Leone
Cases 53 706 38 39 783
Deaths 19 295 34 5 334
Totals
Cases 128 1251 529 195 1975
Deaths 56 686 323 60 1069
(1) New cases were reported between 10 and 11 August 2014.
The total number of cases is subject to change due to ongoing reclassification, retrospective investigation, and availability of laboratory results. Data reported in the Disease Outbreak News are based on official information reported by Ministries of Health.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 1:28 pm 
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EBOLA-LIBERIA
"Out of Control" Ebola outbreak in remote areas of Liberia: WHO
RedaccionAM 13 Aug 2014 - 11:47 CET


l
They point to denial of illness and traditional funerals as factors for propagation

MONROVIA, 13 August ( Al Momento News ) .- The Ebola outbreak is "out of control" in the most remote areas of the Liberian capital, due to denial of illness by patients and traditional funerals, alerted an expert from the World Health Organization (WHO) in Liberia.

"Ebola is a disease against which we must fight together. Do not deny it. Denial is hampering efforts to fight the disease, "said the adviser for disease control WHO, Clement Peters, told the radio station of the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL).

Therefore, he urged citizens to inform health authorities about possible cases of Ebola when they begin to show the first symptoms.

"Denial is the worst, because kids are dying and we need to protect ourselves," he added.

Peters also explained that traditional burials, which involve direct contact with dead bodies, are causing a large number of infections and deaths in many counties in the country.

In this regard, he sought the assistance of community leaders to explain and raise awareness on how to bury the bodies in order to prevent the spread of the disease.

However, some leaders and residents of remote areas to Monrovia, the Liberian capital, denounced the same station that authorities are not responding to their requests for help to treat some patients with symptoms of Ebola.

Proof of this, they explained, is that in some populations the bodies of victims who allegedly died of Ebola are piled in the streets.

As a sign of protest, some residents have used the bodies to block the roads, which according to the Liberian Defense Minister Brownie Samukai, is against the law.

Die Another doctor who treated patients with Ebola

Meanwhile, Modupeh Cole, a doctor who led the fight against Ebola in Sierra Leone today died from the virus, weeks after another with a leading specialist in efforts to stop the epidemic in the African country died last month role

The death of Dr. Cole was announced by the Ministry of Health, according to reports from the capital of Sierra Leone, Freetown reports.

Formed in the United States, Cole was one of the doctors at the public hospital of Connaught, located in Freetown and in which patients are treated Ebola.

Cole's death is a blow to elcombate the Ebola outbreak in a country with serious deficiencies and infrastructure professionals, already reduced his ability to respond to virus in July death of Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan, who ran the device against the epidemic.

Since the outbreak of Ebola emerged in March in Guinea Conakry, a total of 13 thousand people have died in West Africa, according to the latest count released by WHO.

While African governments have mobilized all the resources at its disposal to try to contain the epidemic, the death toll continues to rise, especially in Liberia, where from 7 to 9 August have killed 29 people.

The WHO has declared the outbreak as an "international public emergency," said needed $ 100 million to fight this unprecedented epidemic.

Ebola, which is transmitted by direct contact with blood and body fluids of humans or animals the Infected cause severe bleeding and can have a mortality rate of 90 percent.

This is the first time identified and Ebola epidemic in West Africa is confirmed, because until now always had occurred in Central Africa.

AMN.MX/bhr

http://www.almomento.mx/fuera-de-contro ... um=twitter

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 13, 2014 7:38 pm 
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Countries take more control steps as Ebola totals grow

Lisa Schnirring | Staff Writer | CIDRAP News | Aug 13, 2014

Countries inside and outside Africa have taken new steps to limit the spread of West Africa's Ebola outbreak, from travel-related measures in Africa to a Canadian government offer to donate doses of an experimental Ebola vaccine.

Meanwhile, the number of new infections and deaths continued to climb in the four affected countries, pushing the overall number of cases close to 2,000.

African countries restrict travel

Guinea-Bissau's prime minister yesterday announced that the country had closed its border with Guinea to limit the spread of the virus, Reuters reported today. The order, which took effect yesterday, applies to official road border points, but it may be difficult to enforce in rural border areas. The border with Guinea is on the southern and eastern edges of Guinea-Bissau.

Elsewhere, Ivory Coast on Aug 11 banned travelers from Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia and ordered its main air carrier to suspend flights to and from the three countries, said a story today in Vanguard, a newspaper based in Lagos, Nigeria. Ivory Coast has not detected any Ebola virus disease (EVD) cases but is bordered on the west by both Guinea and Liberia.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has said cross-border travel is one of the challenges for the affected countries, and it has discouraged the cross-border transport of the bodies of dead EVD victims. However, in general it does not recommend travel or trade restrictions, except when EVD cases are suspected or confirmed or when individuals have had contact with a sick person.

In a related development, the WHO clarified the country risk categories in the temporary recommendations it and its emergency committee made on Aug 8 for controlling the outbreak.

In an e-mail statement, the agency said that of three risk levels, Kenya would be in category 2, even though it does not border the outbreak area or have a suspected or confirmed EVD case. It said the recommended steps for category 2 countries applies to Kenya because of the volume of travel between it and countries that do have cases. Category 2 countries also include those that are near or share land borders with outbreak countries.

Canada donates vaccine

Meanwhile, the Canadian government yesterday announced that it would donate doses of an experimental Ebola vaccine developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) to the WHO, which will help facilitate its distribution. In a statement, the PHAC said the vaccine donation is part of Canada’s ongoing commitment to support its international partners in battling the outbreak.

Canada’s donation comes in the wake of a WHO expert panel decision, announced yesterday, that it’s ethical to use unlicensed experimental drugs and vaccines to battle the epidemic, if certain conditions are met.

The PHAC said the government would donate between 800 and 1,000 doses of vaccine to the WHO. The final number will depend on the amount the country needs to keep for additional research and clinical trials and for a small supply in case the vaccine is needed for compassionate use in Canada.

The vaccine, called VSV-EBOV, hasn’t been tested in humans, but has shown promising results in animal trials. The PHAC’s National Microbiology Laboratory developed the vaccine, and the Canadian government owns the intellectual property. It has licensed the development rights to BioProtection Systems, a pharmaceutical company based in Ames, Iowa.

In an Aug 5 statement, NewLink Genetics Corp, BioProtection Systems’ parent company, said it had received an initial $1 million contract from the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency for studies to bring PHAC’s vaccine closer to clinical trials. The company said the contract will cover preclinical toxicology studies and the production of clinical materials.

The company said the vaccine was 100% effective in preventing lethal infections when given to nonhuman primates and that it appears to act rapidly enough to protect animals that recently received a lethal dose of the Ebola virus.

Anthony Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), reviewed the new therapies and vaccines that are in development against EVD in a perspective article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). He said that though the development of interventions has been accelerated, public health measures have been proven to control EVD outbreaks.

He urged experts to consider a possible downside of prematurely deploying unproven interventions in West Africa’s outbreak area. They could cause inadvertent harm, "compromising an already strained relationship between health care professionals and patients in West Africa."

The PHAC said it would also provide an additional $185,000 to the WHO to assist with EVD outbreak efforts in West Africa.

More CDC help arrives in West Africa

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today it now has more than 50 experts on the ground in the EVD outbreak countries. It said it was able to get the experts on the scene in less than 2 weeks, well before the end of the 30-day target it had set.

The CDC initially announced the additional expert help as part of its increased response to the outbreak on Aug 6.

CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, said today in a CDC statement, "We are fulfilling our promise to the people of West Africa, Americans, and the world, that CDC would quickly ramp up its efforts to help bring the worst Ebola outbreak in history under control." He added that although curbing the outbreak won’t be easy or fast, experts know how to stop the disease, and that "working together with our U.S. and international partners and country leadership, together we are doing it.”

Currently, the CDC has 14 staff in Guinea, 18 in Liberia, 16 in Sierra Leone, and 7 in Nigeria. The agency said that though the number of deployed staff will vary day by day, more than 60 experts will remain in the country continuously.

The agency also has efforts underway to protect the United States, according to the statement. For example, efforts are being made to expand the number of labs that can test for the virus. Currently, only the CDC and Department of Defense have the capacity to test for it. Other labs have received guidance on safe handling and will be able to provide initial results, once they show that they can accurately detect or rule out infections. The rapid results will then be confirmed by the CDC.

Illnesses, deaths rise higher

In its outbreak update today, the WHO said that on Aug 10 and 11, the affected countries reported 128 more EVD cases, along with 56 deaths. The overall case number so far is 1,975, just shy of the 2,000 mark. The new reports push the outbreak’s fatality count to 1,069.

Public health workers in Guinea and Sierra Leone are making progress on more complete contact tracing, reaching 94% to 98% of contacts, but more help with the efforts are needed in Liberia, the WHO said.

In another development, Liberia’s army has quarantined a third province to help stop disease transmission, the WHO said.

Over the next few days, the WHO said it will release a report on the medical ethics panel deliberations and a finalized strategic operations plan, which will include mapping to help target people and materials to the area of greatest need.

See also:

Aug 13 Reuters story

Aug 13 Vanguard story

Aug 12 PHAC statement

Aug 5 NewLink Genetics Corp statement

Aug 13 NEJM perspective

Aug 13 CDC statement

Aug 13 WHO update

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspect ... otals-grow

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 7:22 am 
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[2] Sierra Leone: official
Date: Tue 12 Aug 2014
From: Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Sierra Leone
Via ProMED Submit Info tab on <www.promedmail.org> [edited]


Ebola Virus Disease, Sierra Leone: Press Release
---------------------------
Ebola outbreak update: As of today, 12 Aug 2014, we have a total of 184 patients who have survived Ebola Virus Disease and were subsequently discharged. The total number of new confirmed cases is 21: Kailahun 2, Kenema 15; Bombali 1; Port Loko 2 and Tonkolili 1.

The total number of cumulative number of deaths is 259 and cumulative number of confirmed cases is 703 with Kailahun 378, Kenema 250; Kono 1; Kambia 1; Bombali 7; Tonkolili 2; Port Loko 22; Pujehun 3; Bo 22; Moyamba 4; Bonthe 1; Western Area Urban [Freetown] 11; Western Area Rural 1. As of today, Koinadugu district is the only district that has not registered confirmed cases of EVD in Sierra Leone

The cumulative number of probable cases is 38 and probable deaths 34, while the total cumulative number of suspected cases is 39 and suspected deaths is 5.

The World Health Organization has approved the use of the unregistered intervention for EVD in the 3 Ebola affected Mano River Union Countries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Meanwhile, the Government of Sierra Leone through the Emergency Operations Center has written a formal letter to the Director General of the WHO to request the drugs and to ascertain the number of doses available to the country.

The Indian Mercantile Association has donated 500 bucket sets with attached taps and basins to the Ministry of Health and Sanitation as their contribution towards the fight against the Ebola Virus Disease, meanwhile World Vision Sierra Leone also donated 300 million Leones [nearly USD68 000] to the Ministry of Health and Sanitation on behalf of World Vision International as their contribution in the war against the Ebola Virus Disease. World Vision also informed the Ministry of Health and Sanitation that it is in the process of procuring protective gear to be supplied to frontline health workers in health facilities across the country.

Ebola Viral Disease Situation Report: Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Sierra Leone
For more information please contact: District Health Management Team at District level
National level - Directorate of Disease Prevention and Control
<dpcsurveillance@gmail.com>
Mobile:- +23276913000

--
Sidie Yahya Tunis
Director, Information Communication Technology (ICT)
Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Sierra Leone

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 8:50 am 
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CDC through Aug 7
Image

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 8:56 am 
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niman wrote:
[2] Sierra Leone: official
Date: Tue 12 Aug 2014
From: Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Sierra Leone
Via ProMED Submit Info tab on <www.promedmail.org> [edited]


Ebola Virus Disease, Sierra Leone: Press Release
---------------------------
Ebola outbreak update: As of today, 12 Aug 2014, we have a total of 184 patients who have survived Ebola Virus Disease and were subsequently discharged. The total number of new confirmed cases is 21: Kailahun 2, Kenema 15; Bombali 1; Port Loko 2 and Tonkolili 1.

The total number of cumulative number of deaths is 259 and cumulative number of confirmed cases is 703 with Kailahun 378, Kenema 250; Kono 1; Kambia 1; Bombali 7; Tonkolili 2; Port Loko 22; Pujehun 3; Bo 22; Moyamba 4; Bonthe 1; Western Area Urban [Freetown] 11; Western Area Rural 1. As of today, Koinadugu district is the only district that has not registered confirmed cases of EVD in Sierra Leone

The cumulative number of probable cases is 38 and probable deaths 34, while the total cumulative number of suspected cases is 39 and suspected deaths is 5.


Note that the number of confirmed deaths reported by WHO for Sierra Leone is 295, suggesting 259 above has transposed the last two digits.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 1:03 pm 
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38 Deaths In 3 Days: Ebola Wreaks Havoc In Lofa
Thu, 08/14/2014 - 09:01 admin
Entire Family on the Verge of Extinction
By: William Q. Harmon
Image
A sad moment: 9 of the 15 family members are dressed in their protective gear to be transported to Foya Care Center where their fate will be decided (photo by Korlubah Akoi)

The Ebola virus is taking a deadly toll on the northern county of Lofa where the deadly disease initially crossed over from neighboring Guinea. More and more people in that county continue to be victimized by the virus.
In a statistical report provided by the Lofa Health Team on the status of the situation in the county, made available to the Daily Observer Wednesday, August 13, there were 38 deaths recorded in three days. These include confirmed Ebola cases, probable and suspected. This report covers the three-day period August 8 to 11, 2014. The number of new contact cases within this period (August 8-11) stands at 81.
The total deaths in the county since May 29, 2014 to date stands at 221. Lofa is so far one of the most highly affected counties.
The update also disclosed that the number of patients presently at the Foya Care Center (August 8-11), one of the two Ebola centers in the country, stands at 81.
New reported death amongst health workers (August 8-11) is one, totaling 12 deaths since the outbreak in May.
During this period, 45 specimens were taken and tested: 15 were positive, 8 negative and the rest are still pending.
President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf recently said she is saddened by the fast pace at which the virus is spreading in the country, especially to other communities that were not previously affected. “And what this means is that our people are still not listening to the pieces of advice and instructions that are being given.” Such instructions include constant hand washing; avoiding handshakes and touching in general; immediate reporting of cases of high fever, vomiting and bleeding; and avoiding touching anyone suspected to have the virus.
Meanwhile it is being reported that nine members of a single family of 15 were being removed from the Macenta road community, in the capital Voinjama, to the Foya Care Center. This is, however, another worrying concern for the people of Voinjama City, as it wrestles in the grip of the virus.
Macenta road community is located just after the Mandingo quarter where eight persons died few days ago, and is also a predominantly Mandingo community.
According to sources, six members of this family of 15 had already died from the virus. The nine remaining family members were being taken to the Foya Care Center.
President Sirleaf, while declaring a State of Emergency last week, said the Ebola threat continues to grow as a result of ignorance, poverty as well as entrenched religious and cultural practices. She indicated that these continue to exacerbate the spread of the disease, especially in the counties.
The Liberian President added that actions allowed by statute under the public health law are no longer adequate to deal with the Ebola epidemic, as comprehensively and holistically, as the outbreak requires.
The President noted that the scope and skills of the epidemic now exceed the capacity and statutory mandates of any one government agency or ministry. The Ebola virus disease, and the ramifications and the consequences thereof, now constitute an outright national calamity.
Health authorities in Lofa County said due to the influx of suspected cases, patients are now being transported in pickup trucks, which have no sirens, rather than the ambulances, whose sirens are causing a lot of trauma for residents.
Meanwhile, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare Ebola Situation Report (SitRep) has recorded that since the outbreak of the virus in March to August 11, at least 149 confirmed deaths from 166 confirmed positive victims.
Among the 149 have been 37 health workers out of 86, who now fallen prey to the virus.
However, the SitRep lists total deaths in confirmed, probable and suspected cases as 355, for the record.

http://www.liberianobserver.com/news/38 ... havoc-lofa

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