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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 4:56 pm 
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IA Osceola Mississippi Commercial Chickens EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 3,800,000

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:02 pm 
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WASHINGTON, April 20, 2015 - The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza (HPAI) in additional three flocks in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa. No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low.

USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories confirmed HPAI H5N2 in the following states and counties:

Juneau County, Wisconsin (April 17, 2015)
33 mixed poultry

Kandiyohi County, Minnesota (April 17, 2015)
23,000 turkeys
6th detection in this county
A 7th premises of 9000 turkeys in this county has been depopulated because of exposure to this flock

Osceola County, Iowa (April 20, 2015)
5.3 million chickens

The affected premises have been quarantined the premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world. As part of the existing USDA avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners as well as industry are responding quickly and decisively to these outbreaks by following these five basic steps: 1) Quarantine – restricting movement of poultry and poultry-moving equipment into and out of the control area; 2) Eradicate – humanely euthanizing the affected flock(s); 3) Monitor region – testing wild and domestic birds in a broad area around the quarantine area; 4) Disinfect – kills the virus in the affected flock locations; and 5) Test – confirming that the poultry farm is AI virus-free. USDA also is working with its partners to actively look and test for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.

For more information about the ongoing avian influenza disease incidents visit the APHIS website. More information about avian influenza can be found on the USDA avian influenza page. More information about avian influenza and public health is available on the CDC website.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:22 pm 
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Map update

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:49 pm 
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Street view

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:56 pm 
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USDA CONFIRMS CASE OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC H5N2 AVIAN INFLUENZA IN OSCEOLA COUNTY, IOWA
CDC considers the risk to people to be low

DES MOINES – The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza (HPAI) at a commercial laying facility in Osceola County, Iowa. The facility has 5.3 million hens and is the second confirmed case in the state.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Iowa Department of Public Health considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with the virus have ever been detected.

The flock experienced increased mortality and as a result samples were sent to the South Dakota State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for preliminary testing. The APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa confirmed the findings. NVSL is the only internationally recognized Avian Influenza reference laboratory in the United States.

USDA APHIS is working closely with the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS) on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the premise and birds on the property will be humanely euthanized to prevent the spread of the disease.

The United States has the strongest Avian Influenza (AI) surveillance program in the world. As part of the existing USDA avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners as well as industry are responding quickly and decisively to these outbreaks by following these five basic steps: 1) Quarantine – restricting movement of poultry and poultry-moving equipment into and out of the control area; 2) Eradicate – humanely euthanizing the affected flock(s); 3) Monitor region – testing wild and domestic birds in a broad area around the quarantine area; 4) Disinfect – kills the virus in the affected flock locations; and 5) Test – confirm that poultry farms in the area are free of the virus.

The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship in partnership with the Iowa Department of Public Health are working directly with poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure proper precautions are being taken.

These virus strains can travel in wild birds without those birds appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard flock owners, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to state/federal officials, either through their state veterinarian at 515-281-5321 or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.

For more information about the ongoing avian influenza disease incidents visit the APHIS website. More information about avian influenza can be found on the USDA avian influenza page. More information about avian influenza and public health is available on the CDC website. Information will also be posted to the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at www.iowaagriculture.gov/avianinfluenza.asp.

http://www.iowaagriculture.gov/press/20 ... 202015.asp

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 6:15 pm 
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Sonstegard Foods plans to build layer farm in South Dakota
Company wants operation to eventually house 6 million chickens
Release Date: 2015-02-17
Sonstegard Foods, headquartered in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is hoping to greatly expand its egg business by building a new layer farm near Parker, South Dakota. If realized, the farm would enable the company to more than double its total number of laying hens.

"We've been talking about building another chicken farm for five years," Peter Sonstegard, the company's vice president of sales, told the Argus Leader. "We've looked at buying some other companies, we've looked at buying some other farms and we've come to the conclusion that we're better building it ourselves."

The expansion in Parker would cost $85 million overall, with 18 months separating the initial groundbreaking from the first shipment of eggs, he said. The facilities would include two barns to start with and 30 to 40 employees. Sonstegard hopes to add a barn a year until the facility reaches six million chickens, the Sioux City Journal reported.

There would also be a feed mill, manufacturing facility and two sheds to store dry manure – which would then be sold as fertilizer.

Sonstegard Foods is the parent company of Sunrise Farms, which has an estimated 5 million laying hens, according to the WATT Global Media Top Companies Database. Sonstegard Foods originated in 1972, and now operates in five states under several names, selling dry, liquid and shelled eggs to grocery stores, schools, prisons, and manufacturing companies.

News of new layer farm gets mixed reviews in Parker area
Several area residents attended a public meeting in Parker on February 16, with some speaking in favor of the farm.

Parker Mayor Ron Nelson said the city has not taken an official position on the proposed farm, but he did say he likes the idea of 155 new jobs and the impact those jobs will have on the local and regional economy.

At the same meeting, some residents expressed concerns about potential odors, but area farmer Shane Merrill said he toured one of Sonstegard’s facilities in Iowa, and he was impressed with its efforts to reduce odors and flies.

http://www.wattagnet.com/Sonstegard_Foo ... akota.html

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 6:31 pm 
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Up to 5.3 million chickens face cull after H5N2 found at Iowa farm
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In this Nov. 16, 2009 file photo, chickens stand in their cages at a farm near Stuart, Iowa. (AP / Charlie Neibergall)

The Associated Press
Published Monday, April 20, 2015 5:58PM EDT
DES MOINES, Iowa -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the bird flu virus has been found at a farm holding nearly 10 per cent of Iowa's egg-laying chickens.
The confirmation of the highly infectious and deadly H5N2 virus means up to 5.3 million hens must be destroyed at the farm in northwest Iowa's Osceola County.
Iowa is home to roughly 59 million hens that lay nearly one in every five eggs consumed in the country.
RELATED STORIES
Bird flu detected at second Ontario farm
It's the first chicken farm in Iowa to be affected by the virus, which was confirmed at a turkey farm in the state last week.
Several Midwestern states have been affected by the outbreaks, costing poultry producers nearly 7.8 million birds since March.
The latest farm experienced a high number of chicken deaths and sent samples to labs.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/world/up-to-5-3-m ... 47a02021fb

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 6:37 pm 
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Avian flu strikes Iowa egg operation
By Philip Brasher

WASHINGTON, April 20, 2015 - An Iowa egg operation with more than 5 million hens is the latest poultry farm hit by a highly pathogenic strain of avian influenza.

The Agriculture Department announced new findings of the H5N2 virus in Minnesota and Wisconsin as well as the 5.3 million laying hens in Osceola County, Iowa. To date, virtually all of the infected Midwest farms have been commercial turkey operations.
Iowa, which is by far the leading producer of eggs, averaged 59 million layers in 2014, about 10 percent of the total nationwide, according to USDA. No. 2 Ohio had 30 million.
As in other cases, Iowa officials have quarantined the layer operation, and all of the birds will be destroyed.
Samples from the Iowa flock were tested at South Dakota State University, and the finding was confirmed at USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa.
A previous Iowa case was reported last week in a flock of 27,000 turkeys in Buena Vista County.
Elsewhere, the latest infected farms included a 23,000-turkey operation in Kandiyohi County, Minn., the sixth detection in that county, according to APHIS. The Wisconsin case involves a backyard flock of mixed poultry.
USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service last week announced changes in the reporting plans for new cases of the disease ahead of an anticipated increase in detections in the upcoming spring migration of wild birds. Announcements are now being issued daily rather than as detected.

http://www.agri-pulse.com/Iowa-layer-op ... 202015.asp

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 6:38 pm 
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Iowa reports biggest U.S. outbreak of bird flu in poultry
By REUTERS
PUBLISHED: 17:23 EST, 20 April 2015 | UPDATED: 17:23 EST, 20 April 2015

By Tom Polansek
CHICAGO, April 20 (Reuters) - Iowa, the top U.S. egg-producing state, found a lethal strain of bird flu in a flock of millions of hens at an egg-laying facility on Monday, the worst case so far in a national outbreak that has now prompted Wisconsin to declare a state of emergency.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture said the Iowa flock numbered 5.3 million birds while the company that operates the farm said it was 3.8 million. It was unclear why there was a discrepancy.
Iowa was already among the 12 U.S. states to have detected bird flu infections since the beginning of the year. The other states with infected poultry flocks are Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington and Wisconsin.
Bird flu, also called avian influenza or AI, is a viral disease of birds. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers the risk for human infections to be low, and no human cases have been found yet.
The infected Iowa birds were being raised near Harris, Iowa, by Sunrise Farms, an affiliate of Sonstegard Foods Company, the company said. The farm houses 3.8 million hens, according to the company, which sells eggs to food manufacturers, government agencies and retailers.
"We went to great lengths to prevent our birds from contracting AI, but despite best efforts we now confirm many of our birds are testing positive," Sonstegard said in a statement.
The flock has been quarantined, and birds on the property will be culled to prevent the spread of the disease, the USDA said. The virus can kill nearly an entire flock within 48 hours.
In Wisconsin, Governor Scott Walker on Monday declared a state of emergency after three poultry flocks became infected in the past week, according to a statement from his office. The infected birds were chickens at an egg-laying facility, turkeys and a backyard flock of mixed-breed birds, comprising more than 326,000 birds in all.
He has authorized the state's National Guard to help contain the disease, citing "thin" resources available from the federal government. The Guard will disinfect trucks exiting infected premises, a state spokeswoman said.
The USDA has spent $45 million so far responding to the U.S. bird flu outbreak and has deployed about 60 people to Minnesota, the top U.S. turkey-producing state, which has found more infected flocks than any other state.
The infections have hurt trade in the $5.7 billion U.S. export market for poultry and eggs.
(Additional reporting by P.J. Huffstutter in Chicago; Editing by Alan Crosby and Matthew Lewis)


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/reuter ... z3XtMFvqi4
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 6:42 pm 
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Bird flu hits hits 5.3 million chickens in Iowa, just south of Minnesota border
Article by: MIKE HUGHLETT , Star Tribune Updated: April 20, 2015 - 5:22 PM
Two more turkey farms in Minnesota were also hit Monday by the H5N2 virus.

Image
Photo: Matt Rourke,

The biggest bird flu outbreak yet was confirmed Monday at an Iowa egg-laying facility with 5.3 million hens, more birds than the combined number of turkeys on 28 stricken Minnesota farms.

It’s the first egg operation hit by the lethal H5N2 flu in Iowa, the nation’s largest egg producer. The stricken egg-laying facility is in Osceola County, which borders Minnesota just south of Worthington.

Prior to this Iowa outbreak, the biggest single outbreak was 310,000 turkeys in Meeker County.

The USDA also reported Monday that two more Minnesota farms with a total of 31,000 birds had been hit by the bird flu. The two outbreaks were the sixth and seventh in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota’s biggest turkey-producing county.

Minnesota has been the epicenter of the bird flu since the virus struck a farm in the western part of the state in early March. Now, 28 farms in 14 counties have been hit by the flu, leading to deaths of about 1.7 million birds.

The virus can kill a barn filled with thousands of birds in a couple of days. But the majority of the turkeys killed have been euthanized out of precaution, a government policy to stop the disease from spreading.

Turkeys are particularly susceptible to highly pathogenic H5N2 flu. But an egg laying operation with 200,000 hens in eastern Wisconsin was stricken a week ago, and a commercial chicken farm in California was hit in February.

Also on Monday, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker declared a state of emergency there, authorizing the Wisconsin National Guard to assist authorities responding to the bird flu in Jefferson, Juneau and Barron counties. That includes helping with the response and clean up once the infected birds are killed.



Mike Hughlett • 612-673-7003

http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/he ... 14491.html

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