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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2015 1:14 pm 
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Cornell press release indicates the H3 associated with canoine influenza in Chicago is H3N2 related to avian H3N2 found in dogs and cats in Asia.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2015 1:15 pm 
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Midwest Canine Influenza outbreak caused by new strain of virus
APRIL 12, 2015 BY JOE SCHWARTZ
ITHACA, N.Y. – The canine influenza outbreak afflicting more than 1,000 dogs in Chicago and other parts of the Midwest is caused by a different strain of the virus than was earlier assumed, according to laboratory scientists at Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin. Researchers at Cornell say results from additional testing indicate that the outbreak is being caused by a virus closely related to Asian strains of influenza A H3N2 viruses, currently in wide circulation in southern Chinese and South Korean dog populations since being identified in 2006. There is no evidence that it can be transmitted to humans.
The outbreak in the Midwest had been attributed to the H3N8 strain of virus, which was identified in the U.S. dog population in 2004 and has been circulating since. The H3N2 virus had not been previously detected in North America. The outbreak in Chicago suggests a recent introduction of the H3N2 virus from Asia.
Testing of clinical samples from the outbreak conducted at The New York State Animal Diagnostic Laboratory at Cornell indicated that the virus was Influenza A. Further testing led researchers to believe a new strain was at fault. Subsequent testing, carried out with the assistance of the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, identified the new subtype as H3N2. The National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, IA is sequencing two isolates from this outbreak, which were isolated at Cornell, to facilitate rapid complete characterization of the viruses.
Both Influenza strains can cause high fever, loss of appetite, coughing, nasal discharge, and lethargy. Symptoms may be more severe in cases caused by the H3N2 virus. Some infected dogs may not show symptoms at all.
H3N2 has caused infection and respiratory illness in cats.
Veterinary professionals are advised that diagnostic testing of samples from sick pets can be done using a broadly targeted Influenza A matrix reverse transciptase-polymerase chain reaction assay (Rt-PCR). The canine-specific Influenza A H3N8 Rt-PCR in use in several laboratories will not detect this virus. Serology is also currently not available as the H3N2 virus is different enough from H3N8 that antibodies may not cross react. However, an H3N2-specific serologic assay is under development and will be available soon.
It is not known if the current vaccine will provide any protection from this new virus. It does protect against H3N8, which is in circulation in some areas. Other preventive advice remains the same: In areas where the viruses are active, avoid places where dogs congregate, such as dog parks and grooming salons.
Owners of symptomatic dogs and cats should consult their veterinarians about testing and treatment.
Cornell University has television, ISDN and dedicated Skype/Google+ Hangout studios available for media interviews.

http://mediarelations.cornell.edu/2015/ ... -of-virus/

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2015 1:19 pm 
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April 14, 2015

New virus strain causes Midwest dog flu outbreak

The canine influenza outbreak afflicting more than 1,000 dogs in Chicago and other parts of the Midwest is caused by a different strain of the virus than was earlier assumed, according to laboratory scientists at Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin.

Researchers at Cornell say results from additional testing indicate that the outbreak is caused by a virus closely related to Asian strains of influenza A H3N2 viruses, currently in wide circulation in southern Chinese and South Korean dog populations, since they were first identified in 2006. There is no evidence that the virus can be transmitted to humans.

The outbreak in the Midwest initially was attributed to the H3N8 strain of virus - which was identified in the U.S. dog population in 2004. This is the first time the H3N2 virus has been detected in North America. The Chicago outbreak suggests a recent introduction of the H3N2 virus from Asia.

Testing of clinical samples from the outbreak conducted at the New York State Animal Diagnostic Laboratory at Cornell revealed that the virus was influenza A. Further testing led researchers to believe there may be a new strain. Subsequent testing, carried out with the assistance of the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, identified the new subtype as H3N2. The National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa, is sequencing two H3N2 isolates, which were sent from Cornell, to facilitate rapid complete characterization of the viruses.

Both influenza strains can cause high fever, loss of appetite, coughing, nasal discharge and lethargy. The H3N2 virus may cause severe symptoms, though some infected dogs may not show symptoms at all.

H3N2 has caused infection and respiratory illness in cats.

It is not known if the current vaccine will provide any protection from this new virus, but it does protect against H3N8, which is also in circulation in some areas. Other preventive advice remains the same: In areas where the viruses are active, avoid places where dogs congregate, such as dog parks and grooming salons.

Owners of symptomatic dogs and cats should consult their veterinarians about testing and treatment.

http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2015/04 ... u-outbreak

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2015 1:22 pm 
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Update on Canine Influenza (Dog Flu) Outbreak Reported in Chicago Area
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April 13, 2015 – A canine influenza A H3N2 virus is responsible for an outbreak of dog flu reported in the Chicago area according to a press release issued by Cornell University, home to the New York State Animal Diagnostic Laboratory. Dog flu is a contagious respiratory disease in dogs. Two canine influenza viruses have been identified worldwide: an influenza A H3N8 virus and an influenza A H3N2 virus. No human infections with either of these canine influenza viruses have ever been reported.

Previously, canine influenza A H3N8 viruses have been identified in U.S. dog populations. However, testing at the New York State Animal Diagnostic Laboratory and the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory suggests the dog flu virus responsible for the current outbreak in dogs is an H3N2 virus similar to Asian H3N2 dog flu viruses that have been detected in dogs in parts of Asia since 2007.

The National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, IA is sequencing two isolates from this outbreak to facilitate rapid complete characterization of the viruses. A virus isolate also is being sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for additional analysis.

Signs of dog flu infection in dogs include cough, runny nose and fever, but not all dogs will show signs of illness. The severity of illness associated with dog flu in dogs can range from no signs to severe illness resulting in pneumonia and sometimes death in dogs. Tests are available to determine if a dog has been infected. CDC recommends that people concerned about dog flu in their pets speak to their veterinarian.

Almost all dogs can be susceptible to infection with canine influenza viruses, and illness tends to spread among dogs housed in kennels and shelters. A vaccine to protect dogs against canine influenza A H3N8 has been available in the United States since 2009. It is not known yet whether the H3N8 dog flu vaccine will offer protection against the H3N2 dog flu virus.

To date, there is no evidence of transmission of dog flu viruses from dogs to people and there have been no reported human infections with the canine influenza viruses. Animal studies suggest that neither virus transmits well to other companion animal species[308 KB, 10 pages] with the exception of H3N2 dog flu, which has been known to infect cats. CDC considers the human health risk posed by this dog flu outbreak to be low at this time. Once available, full genetic sequencing information on this virus will further inform the human health risk assessment. CDC will continue to watch this situation closely and provide updated information as it becomes available.

Two Dog Flu Viruses

Canine influenza A (H3N8) virus is closely related to an influenza virus found in horses for more than 40 years. Experts believe this horse influenza virus changed in a way that allowed it to infect dogs, and the first dog flu infections caused by these viruses were reported in 2004, initially in greyhounds. This virus is now considered a dog-specific lineage of influenza A (H3N8) virus.

In 2007, a canine influenza A H3N2 virus was detected in dogs in South Korea. This virus seems to have been an avian influenza virus that adapted to infect dogs. This canine H3N2 virus has since been reported in China and Thailand, and reportedly can affect cats as well as dogs. It is different from human seasonal H3N2 viruses.

For more information on dog flu, please visit:

CDC’s Key Facts about Canine Influenza (Dog Flu)
The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Canine Influenza FAQ
Cook County’s Animal & Rabies Control Homepage

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/news/canine-influenza-update.htm

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2015 1:32 pm 
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New Flu Strain Sickens Thousands Of Dogs, Threatens Midwest

College students weren’t the only ones to come back from Spring Break worse for wear. In Chicago, more than 1,100 dogs—many in daycare or kennels while their humans took vacation for a week—were infected by the H3N2 dog influenza virus, and six have died. The virus has also been reported in pups in Indiana, Ohio and Wisconsin.

According to a recent CDC report, state veterinary laboratories in New York and Wisconsin have identified similarities between this H3N2 strain and the Asian H3N2 dog flu virus that was found in China and South Korea in 2006—both strains are likely an adaptation of a bird flu virus. H3N2 has since been reported in Thailand, and has also affected cats.

More Facebook Is Mobilizing An Army Against Dog-Killing Cops
Though symptoms—cough, runny nose and fever—are exactly the same, the CDC does note that the dog version of H3N2 is different than the H3N2 human flu virus that causes yearly illnesses during the winter months. And there have been no cases of dog flu viruses spreading to humans. There’s no vaccine for H3N2.

Dr. Donna Alexander, administrator of the Cook County Department of Animal and Rabies Control, recommends that dog owners should avoid places where their pets might interact with other dogs, until the threat passes. This includes dog parks, training classes and boarding/daycare facilities.

A Timeline of Dog Flu in the U.S.
2004: Influenza A H3N8 virus, believed to be an adaptation from horses, is first seen in January in several Greyhounds at a dog track in Florida.
2006-2007: Cases of dog flu, identified as Influenza A H3N2, are found in pet dogs in southern China. The virus is later reported as circulating in farmed dogs in Guangdong, China. An outbreak of H3N2 is detected in South Korea, and phylogenetic analysis shows the Korean and Chinese viruses are similar—both originating from an avian strain.
2009: A vaccine to protect dogs against Influenza A H3N8, which had spread via dog tracks to 30 states and Washington, DC, is made available.
2012: A small vet hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, reports several clinical cases of dogs with flu-like symptoms. Analysis determines it is related to the H3N2 virus in Korea.
2015: An April dog flu outbreak in Chicago—initially attributed to the H3N8 virus—is found to be caused by a new strain, and suggests a recent introduction of the H3N2 virus from Asia.
Read More:
Update on Canine Influenza (Dog Flu) Outbreak Reported in Chicago Area (CDC)
Canine Influenza: A Pet Owner’s Guide (American Veterinary Medical Association)

http://www.vocativ.com/culture/health-c ... n-midwest/?

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