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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 2:48 pm 
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USDA lists H5N8 in American Green winged teal in Yolo County California

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife_dama ... STATES.pdf

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 2:52 pm 
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WILD BIRD POSITIVE HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA CASES IN THE UNITED STATES
Case # COLLECTION DATE SPECIES COUNTY STATE SUBTYPE SUBMITTER
1 12-08-2014 Northern Pintail Whatcom WA H5N2 Washington State
2 12-20-2014 Mallard Lane OR H5N2 USDA-APHIS
3 12-28-2014 Gadwall Butte CA H5N8 USDA-APHIS
4 01-02-2015 American Wigeon Davis UT H5N8 USDA-APHIS
5 01-07-2015 American Green-winged Teal Yolo CA H5N8 USDA-APHIS
6 01-07-2015 Mallard Gooding ID H5N8 USDA-APHIS

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 3:26 pm 
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H5N8 map updated

https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?auth ... IjI0Pz2tn8

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 6:24 pm 
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Experts warn backyard chicken owners about bird flu
Butte, Yolo counties see waterfowl

UPDATED 11:10 AM PST Jan 14, 2015

SHOW TRANSCRIPT
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KCRA) —UC Davis animal experts have a warning for backyard chicken owners: A strain of bird flu could affect local poultry.
.
Watch report: Experts warn backyard chicken owners about bird flu risks

“We want to encourage backyard owners to use the utmost caution and prevent their birds from interacting with waterfowl, which appear to be the carriers," said Maurice Pitesky, with the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

The strain, known as h5n8, is traced back to parts of Asia and North Africa, spreading from bird to bird or contaminated shoes or equipment. Now, it’s being reported closer to home.

“There have been two counties -- Butte and Yolo -- (that) have had two waterfowl that have been found through increased surveillance with this strain of high pathogenic avian influenza," Pitesky said.

This time of year, Northern California is part of the migratory path of birds.

“If you talk to waterfowl experts, we have eight times as many waterfowl right now in California than we'll have in about three months, from now when they move up north for the breeding season," Pitesky said.

Meantime, the area is also seeing more backyard chicken owners.

Benjamin Uhlenhop, with Western Feed and Pet Supply, said he's noticed a significant demand.

"I sold probably anywhere between 12 to 1,500 chicks last year," Uhlenhop said. "Years prior to that, when I started working for the company, we ordered 100 every other week."

Since the habitat for backyard chickens is appealing to waterfowl, Sacramento chicken owners Greg Howes and Brian Fikes said they're taking the warning seriously.

"I can hear the geese," Howes said. "I kind of mark the seasons that way, but now there is kind of that negative thing that comes with that, too."

http://newspaper.st/Links/111198300/

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 6:25 pm 
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ALWAYS BEAUTIFUL IN THE DAYTIME AS WELL AS NIGHT. NEW TONIGHT, A WARNING FOR DOCKYARD CHICKEN OWNERS. A STRAIN OF BIRD FLU COULD AFFECT LOCAL POULTRY. WE SEE IT EVERY YEAR IN OUR REGION AS PART OF THE MIGRATORY PATH OF BIRDS. THEY WILL TIE YOU WE HAVE ABOUT EIGHT TIMES AS MANY WATERFOWL IN CALIFORNIA AS WE W ILL IN THREE MONTHS. SOME COUNTIES HAVE HAD WATERFOWL FOUND THROUGH INCREASED SURVEILLANCE TO BE POSITIVE FOR THE STRAIN OF AVIAN INFLUENZA. IT IS FOUND IN ASIA, SPREADING FROM BIRD TO BIRD. SINCE IT HITS CLOSER TO HOME, UC DAVIS EXPERTS HAVE A MESSAGE FOR CHICKEN OWNERS. WE WANT TO ENCOURAGE THEM TO PREVENT BIRDS FROM INTERACTING WITH WATERFOWL WHICH APPEARED TO BE THE CARRIERS TO READ IT IS BECOMING MORE COMMON TO SEE THEM IN THE BACKYARD. I SOLD ANYWHERE FROM 1200-1500 CHICKENS. THE OWNERS SAY THEY ARE TAKING THE WARNING SERIOUSLY. I CAN HEAR THE GEESE OVERHEAD AT NIGHT. NOW THERE IS THAT NEGATIVE THING THAT COMES ALONG WITH THAT. WHILE THERE IS NO REASON FOR ALARM, THERE ARE STEPS THAT COULD HELP KEEP YOUR CHICKENS FROM GETTING SICK. IF THEY HAVE PONDS, THEY CAN DRAIN THEM. EXPERTS SAY AS A PREVENTATIVE MEASURE, IT IS A GOOD IDEA TO PUT WIRE TO KEEP THE BIRDS IN AND OTHER WILDLIFE OUT. THERE ARE MEASURES WE SHOULD TAKE ALL THE TIME. KATHY PARK, KCRA THREE. OWNERS OF BACKYARD CHICKENS WHO NOTICE ANYTHING UNUSUAL

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 4:55 am 
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Update on Avian Influenza Findings in the Pacific Flyway
Last Modified: Jan 20, 2015 Print
The United States Department of Agriculture has confirmed several findings of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the Pacific flyway since mid-December. These findings are limited to wild birds and backyard poultry flocks that have access to the outdoors. These viruses have NOT been found in any commercial poultry in the United States. Commercial poultry producers follow strict biosecurity practices and raise their birds in very controlled environments.

No human cases with these viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada or internationally. There is no immediate public health concern as a result of these detections.

Backyard poultry findings confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories include:

HPAI H5N8 in a backyard poultry flock in Winston, Oregon (December 19)
HPAI H5N2 in a backyard poultry flock in Benton County, Washington (January 3)
HPAI H5N2 in a backyard poultry flock in Benton County, Washington (January 9)
HPAI H5N2 in a backyard poultry flock in Clallam County, Washington (January 16)
HPAI H5N2 in a backyard poultry flock in Canyon County, Idaho (January 16)


Captive wild bird findings confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories:

HPAI H5N8 in captive gyrfalcons in Whatcom County, Washington (December 16)
HPAI H5N2 in captive falcons in Canyon County, Idaho (January 16)


Wild bird findings confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories are available here.

The findings are part of our increased AI surveillance in the Pacific flyway and increased outreach to backyard poultry enthusiasts. USDA is coordinating closely with its partners, including Washington, Oregon and California State officials, the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, on avian influenza surveillance, reporting, and control efforts. The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, where we actively look for the disease and provide 100% compensation to affected producers to encourage reporting.

Because the H5N2 and H5N8 avian influenza strains are currently circulating in migratory birds in the Pacific flyway, we anticipate our active surveillance will result in additional findings in both wild birds and in backyard flocks with access to the outdoors. However, because of our commercial producers’ continuing vigilance, U.S. poultry is safe.

USDA continues to report these findings to the World Animal Health Organization (OIE) as part of the ongoing Pacific flyway avian influenza incident. USDA is working with trading partners to minimize trade impacts on poultry and poultry products as much as possible.

While neither virus has been found in commercial poultry, USDA emphasizes that poultry, poultry products and wild birds are safe to eat if they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, need to continue practicing good biosecurity, preventing contact between their birds and wild birds, and reporting sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through your state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/ap ... ian_health

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 9:17 pm 
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Sacramento backyard chickens at risk for catching ‘bird flu’
ELLEN GARRISONEGARRISON@SACBEE.COM
01/21/2015 4:32 PM 01/21/2015 4:32 PM

Image
Stephanie Duncan’s chickens: Dottie (left), Fern (center), and Henrietta (right) COURTESY OF STEPHANIE DUNCAN

UC Davis veterinarians are warning backyard chicken owners to take steps to protect their birds as particularly strong strains of avian influenza make their way into Northern California.

While not a public health concern for people, the two strains detected in waterfowl in Butte and Yolo counties are consistent with the H5N2 and H5N8 strains and are considered highly dangerous for chickens. Owners should enclose chickens in netting to keep them away from wild animals and store feed bags in a secure place, the vets said.

Sacramentans have joined others around the country in embracing urban chicken keeping. A 2011 city ordinance allows city residents to keep up to three hens in backyard coops. Two-hundred-thirty-three licenses were issued in Sacramento in 2014, according to Gina Knepp of the Front Street Animal Shelter. She added that this number is likely significantly lower than the actual number of hens residing in the city limits because chicken owners often don’t obtain the required licenses.

So far, there have been no domestic cases of these strains of avian influenza, but Maurice Pitesky at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine said he wouldn’t be surprised to see cases in backyard birds.

“The problem is there are all different levels of biosecurity for backyard birds,” Pitesky said. “People can carry the virus on their shoes and car tires and easily transmit it to their birds.”

The California Department of Food and Agriculture recommends owners put aside a set of clothing and shoes for interacting with their chickens.

There are not many symptoms of ‘bird flu’: the main indicator is the high mortality rate, which may approach 100 percent for these strains, according to Pitesky. However, rare symptoms include a drop in egg production, swelling or bruising of the head and neck, diarrhea or difficulty walking.

Greg Howes, co-owner of artisan chicken coop company Two Flew the Coop, recommends chicken owners do a visual inspection of their chickens when they let the birds out in the morning and when they lock them back up at night to make sure they’re behaving normally. He also recommended vigilance about sanitation including washing hands before and after handling chickens and restricting visitors to the backyard poultry.

“When people have chickens, neighbors and friends want to come over and see them, but the best case scenario is to limit the exposure of your flock,” said Howes. “These are measures we should think about at all times, not just in flu season.”

Wild waterfowl and wild animals such as rodents can carry the virus without showing any symptoms. Chicken owners with backyard ponds or who live near water should be especially careful to keep their chickens enclosed, as wild waterfowl like to congregate in these places.

Stephanie Duncan, 35, of Land Park, said she doesn’t see any waterfowl in her backyard. She and her roomate decided to let their three chickens roam around their yard on a daily basis, but not before doing research on the small doves and finches that are the only birds to come to her backyard. She found these birds are less susceptible to avian influenza than waterfowl. Duncan keeps her birds in an enclosed coop at night and their feed tightly locked in galvanized containers.

“I’m taking some extra precautions,” Duncan said. “I’ve stopped filling the wild bird feeders in my yard, even though the wild birds in my area don’t usually carry influenza. I just want to make sure my birds are safe.”

There are more wild birds than usual in the Sacramento area right now because the city is located along the Pacific Flyway, a major north-south migratory path for waterfowl.

“During the winter there are approximately eight times the number of waterfowl in California than what we will see three months from now,” Pitesky said.

Highly-pathogenic avian influenzas, meaning they have a high mortality rate, are rare in North America. There hasn’t been a major outbreak of “high-path” ‘bird flu’ amongst domestic birds since 1986. So far, the cases found in California, Washington, Oregan and British Columbia do not constitute an outbeak, but these strains are particularly strong. “Low-path” influenzas are identified regularly, but are easily taken care of.

In California, there have been no cases reported in domestic flocks, but Knepp said backyard chicken owners could be misidentifying the cause of death for their birds. Commercial flocks are tested regularly and have shown no signs of avian influenza.

“Commercial owners do a very good job of biosecurity,” Pitesky said.

Pitesky said any domestic chicken owner whose birds get sick or die should submit the carcass should submit the bird to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory for treatment or autopsy so the department can keep a close eye on the progression of the disease.

Owners of sick or recently deceased birds should call their veterinarian and the sick bird hotline at (866) 922-2473.

Call The Bee’s Ellen Garrison at (916) 321-1006.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/articl ... rylink=cpy

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2015 12:58 pm 
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Highly pathogenic avian influenza,
United States of America

Information received on 22/01/2015 from Dr John Clifford, Deputy Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, United States of America
Summary
Report type Follow-up report No. 4
Date of start of the event 10/12/2014
Date of pre-confirmation of the event 14/12/2014
Report date 22/01/2015
Date submitted to OIE 22/01/2015
Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence 2004
Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza
Serotype H5N8
Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to a defined zone within the country
Related reports Immediate notification (16/12/2014)
Follow-up report No. 1 (19/12/2014)
Follow-up report No. 2 (29/12/2014)
Follow-up report No. 3 (07/01/2015)
Follow-up report No. 4 (22/01/2015)
New outbreaks (4)
Outbreak 1 Butte County, Butte, CALIFORNIA
Date of start of the outbreak 02/01/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Not applicable
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Gadwall:Anas strepera(Anatidae)
Affected population Hunter harvested wild gadwall duck
Outbreak 2 Yolo county, Yolo, CALIFORNIA
Date of start of the outbreak 09/01/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Not applicable
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Green-winged Teal:Anas carolinensis(Anatidae)
Affected population Hunter harvested wild American green-winged teal duck.
Outbreak 3 Davis County, Davis, UTAH
Date of start of the outbreak 09/01/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Not applicable
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
American wigeon:Anas americana(Anatidae)
Affected population Hunter harvested wild American wigeon duck.
Outbreak 4 Gooding County, Gooding, IDAHO
Date of start of the outbreak 16/01/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Not applicable
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Mallard:Anas platyrhynchos(Anatidae)
Affected population Hunter harvested wild mallard duck
Summary of outbreaks Total outbreaks: 4
Total animals affected
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Gadwall:Anas strepera(Anatidae) **
Green-winged Teal:Anas carolinensis(Anatidae) **
American wigeon:Anas americana(Anatidae) **
Mallard:Anas platyrhynchos(Anatidae) **
Outbreak statistics
Species Apparent morbidity rate Apparent mortality rate Apparent case fatality rate Proportion susceptible animals lost*
Gadwall:Anas strepera(Anatidae) ** ** ** **
Green-winged Teal:Anas carolinensis(Anatidae) ** ** ** **
American wigeon:Anas americana(Anatidae) ** ** ** **
Mallard:Anas platyrhynchos(Anatidae) ** ** ** **
*Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
**Not calculated because of missing information
Epidemiology
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
Contact with wild species
Epidemiological comments The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), in conjunction with State Departments of Agriculture and Wildlife, are continuing to conduct a comprehensive epidemiological investigation and enhanced surveillance (including wild bird surveillance of hunter harvested birds) in response to the HPAI H5N8 wild bird related event. Novel avian influenza virus of Eurasian origin (EA-H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4) spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014. Introduction of this EA-H5N8 virus into the Pacific Flyway sometime during 2014 has allowed mixing with North American (AM) lineage viruses and generated new combinations with genes from both EA and AM origin (or “reassortant” viruses) such as this EA/AM H5N2-reassortant detected in Canada and the US. These findings are not unexpected as the EA-H5N8 virus continues to circulate. The EA H5 clade 2.3.4.4 viruses are highly pathogenic for poultry. As part of the increased AI surveillance of wild birds (performed by testing hunter harvested birds), H5N8 with an amino acid sequence at the HA cleavage site that is consistent with highly pathogenic avian influenza has been identified in wild ducks in the Pacific flyway. HA and NA sequence fragments from these viruses, and the virus from the backyard finding, are essentially identical to that found in the reported gyrfalcon. Update on the Oregon backyard premises as of 17 January 2015: • A 10 km active surveillance zone was initiated for avian influenza. o All surveillance and testing has been negative for AI. The HPAI EA-H5N8 virus has NOT been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the United States.
Control measures
Measures applied
Stamping out
Quarantine
Movement control inside the country
Disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)
Vaccination prohibited
No treatment of affected animals
Measures to be applied
No other measures
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory name and type Species Test Test date Result
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) American wigeon real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 09/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Gadwall real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 02/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Gadwall virus sequencing 02/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Green-winged Teal real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 09/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Green-winged Teal virus sequencing 09/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Mallard real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 16/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Mallard virus sequencing 16/01/2015 Positive
NationalVeterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) American wigeon virus sequencing 09/01/2015 Positive
Future Reporting
The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid ... rtid=17031

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