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PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:42 pm 
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H5N2 confirmed in hunter killed mallard in Fern Ridge Wildlife Area near Eugene, Oregon.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:46 pm 
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Bird flu outbreak spreads to Eugene
Tracy Loew, Statesman Journal 6:13 p.m. PST January 14, 2015
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(Photo: DANIELLE PETERSON / Statesman Journal)

Highly contagious avian flu has spread to Eugene, less than a month after its first Oregon appearance in domestic fowl in southern Oregon.

There is no human health risk, but hawks and falcons may be susceptible to the virus, state officials said.

The H5N8 influenza virus was confirmed Tuesday in a mallard killed Dec. 20 by a hunter at Fern Ridge Wildlife Area.

It was tested first by the OSU Veterinary Diagnostic Lab in Corvallis, then at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.

Avian flu has been circulating in Europe and East Asia.

In November, it began hitting commercial poultry farms in Western Canada, and last month was found in wild birds in Washington, near the Canadian border, and in southern Oregon.

The mallard did not show signs of sickness and there have been no reports of waterfowl die-offs related to avian flu in North America, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said.

The detection is not a surprise for wildlife managers, said Brandon Reishus, ODFW migratory bird coordinator.

“After seeing initial results from other states, we suspected the HPAI strains (H5N2 and H5N8) would be found in wild waterfowl in Oregon,” Reishus said.

This time of year, migratory waterbirds are on wintering areas throughout the Pacific Flyway, which extends from Alaska to South America.

In the coming months these birds will migrate back to nesting areas to the north, potentially spreading the virus to new areas.

Wild birds can pass the influenza virus to their species or other bird species inhabiting shared wetlands or through predator and prey interactions.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture is advising commercial poultry growers and backyard flock owners to be vigilant with biosecurity measures and surveillance.

That includes preventing contact between their birds and wild birds and closely monitoring their flocks.

Backyard flock owners can report sick birds to the State Veterinarian’s office at 1-800-347-7028 or can call USDA toll free at 1-866-536-7593.

tloew@statesmanjournal.com, (503) 399-6779 or follow at Twitter.com/SJWatchdog

http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/t ... /21784797/?

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:56 pm 
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Fujian H5N2 Map update
https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid= ... NlIM&hl=en

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:58 pm 
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GRANTS PASS, Ore. (AP) -- A wild duck shot by a hunter in the Willamette Valley is the first wild bird in Oregon to test positive for avian flu since the disease showed up recently in Washington.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said Wednesday the female mallard was taken Dec. 20 at Fern Ridge Wildlife Area outside Eugene and was tested as part of a program initiated since avian flu appeared in Washington.

Department veterinarian Colin Gillin says avian flu poses no risk to people or wild waterfowl, but can kill domestic poultry.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/O/ ... TE=DEFAULT

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 11:08 pm 
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Avian flu found in wild mallard at Fern Ridge
No human health risk but falcons, hawks may be susceptible to virus

Jan. 14, 2015

SALEM, Ore.--Avian influenza strain HPAI H5N2 has been found in a mallard harvested by a hunter at Fern Ridge Wildlife Area near Eugene, Ore. The virus strain, known as H5N8, poses no immediate threat to human health. It has been circulating in Europe and East Asia and has not made people sick.

The female mallard was sampled Dec. 20, 2014 as part of routine testing by ODFW, USDA/APHIS, USGS and USFWS. Testing for high path avian influenza is done at several labs including the OSU Veterinary Diagnostic Lab in Corvallis. However, further confirmation regarding the strain of bird flu virus requires special testing at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.

ODFW was notified of positive test results for the HPAI H5N2 found in the Fern Ridge mallard yesterday. It is the same strain that was detected in a pintail duck in northwestern Washington state last month.

The strain has not caused noticeable disease for Oregon’s wild waterfowl, which have evolved with the virus and usually do not get sick. The mallard did not show signs of sickness and there have been no reports of any recent waterfowl die-offs related to avian influenza anywhere in North America.

This detection follows a December detection of another avian influenza strain, HPAI H5N8, in backyard poultry near Winston, Ore. It marks the second highly pathogenic avian influenza virus identified in Oregon.

The detection is not a surprise for wildlife managers. “After seeing initial results from other states, we suspected the HPAI strains (H5N2 and H5N8) would be found in wild waterfowl in Oregon,” said Brandon Reishus, ODFW migratory bird coordinator. “California has also documented the virus in waterfowl and it has been found as far west as Davis County, Utah.”

This time of year, migratory waterbirds (ducks, geese, shorebirds) are on wintering areas throughout the Pacific Flyway, which extends from Alaska to South America. In the coming months these birds will migrate back to nesting areas to the north, potentially spreading the virus to new areas. Wild birds can pass the influenza virus to their species or other bird species inhabiting shared wetlands or through predator and prey interactions.

While this strain often does not sicken waterfowl, it may be a threat to falcons and hawks, which can exhibit symptoms and die. ODFW is advising falconers to refrain from hunting wild waterfowl or feeding their birds wild waterfowl meat or organ tissue. More information is available at ODFW’s falconry webpage. Oregon has 130 licensed falconers.

Wildlife managers will continue to test wild birds in Oregon for avian influenza. For more information on avian influenza in wild birds, visit USGS National Wildlife Health Center.
http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_inform ... influenza/

Hunters: practice safe bird handling
The strain of avian influenza found in Oregon and other western states is no immediate threat to human health. But hunters should always practice safe bird handling and cooking techniques:

Wear rubber or latex gloves when handling and cleaning game birds.
Do not eat, drink, smoke or touch your face when handling birds.
Keep the game bird and its juices away from other foods.
Thoroughly clean knives and any other equipment or surfaces that touch birds. Use a solution of one third cup of chlorine bleach per one gallon of water.
Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after handling birds (or with alcohol-based hand products if your hands are not visibly soiled).
Cook all game meat thoroughly (up to at least 165° F) to kill disease organisms and parasites. Use a food thermometer to ensure the inside of the bird has reached at least 165° F.
Upland bird and waterfowl (duck, goose) hunting seasons are open through Jan. 25, 2015 in Oregon. Goose hunting is also open in parts of the state during late January, February and March.

Danger to domestic poultry
This strain of the flu (H5N2) is deadly to domestic birds (chickens, turkeys, Guinea fowl). The Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) strongly encourages backyard poultry producers to prevent contact between their birds and wild birds. Any sick domestic birds should be reported to the State Veterinarian’s office at 1-800-347-7028 or USDA at 1-866-536-7593.

ODFW is part of the State of Oregon’s multi-agency response to highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza, along with the Oregon Department of Agriculture, the Oregon Health Authority and the US Department of Agriculture’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS).

For information on avian influenza in domestic birds, visit ODA’s website: http://bit.do/ORbirdflu

###


Contact:

Michelle Dennehy
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
(503 947-6022
Michelle.N.Dennehy@state.or.us

http://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2015/january/011415.asp

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2015 4:18 pm 
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Avian flu found in wild mallard at Fern Ridge
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Avian flu found in wild mallard at Fern Ridge
Avian flu found in wild mallard at Fern Ridge
Posted: Thursday, January 15, 2015 11:06 am | Updated: 11:20 am, Thu Jan 15, 2015.
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Avian influenza strain HPAI H5N2 has been found in a mallard harvested by a hunter at Fern Ridge Wildlife Area near Eugene, Oregon.
The virus strain, known as H5N8, poses no immediate threat to human health. It has been circulating in Europe and East Asia and has not made people sick.
The female mallard was sampled Dec. 20, 2014 as part of routine testing by ODFW, USDA/APHIS, USGS and USFWS. Testing for high path avian influenza is done at several labs including the OSU Veterinary Diagnostic Lab in Corvallis. However, further confirmation regarding the strain of bird flu virus requires special testing at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.
ODFW was notified of positive test results for the HPAI H5N2 found in the Fern Ridge mallard. It is the same strain that was detected in a pintail duck in northwestern Washington state in December.
The strain has not caused noticeable disease for Oregon’s wild waterfowl, which have evolved with the virus and usually do not get sick. The mallard did not show signs of sickness and there have been no reports of any recent waterfowl die-offs related to avian influenza anywhere in North America.
This detection follows a December detection of another avian influenza strain, HPAI H5N8, in backyard poultry near Winston, Oregon. It marks the second highly pathogenic avian influenza virus identified in Oregon.
The detection is not a surprise for wildlife managers. “After seeing initial results from other states, we suspected the HPAI strains (H5N2 and H5N8) would be found in wild waterfowl in Oregon,” said Brandon Reishus, ODFW migratory bird coordinator. “California has also documented the virus in waterfowl and it has been found as far west as Davis County, Utah.”
This time of year, migratory waterbirds (ducks, geese, shorebirds) are on wintering areas throughout the Pacific Flyway, which extends from Alaska to South America. In the coming months, these birds will migrate back to nesting areas to the north, potentially spreading the virus to new areas. Wild birds can pass the influenza virus to their species or other bird species inhabiting shared wetlands or through predator and prey interactions.
While this strain often does not sicken waterfowl, it may be a threat to falcons and hawks, which can exhibit symptoms and die.
ODFW is advising falconers to refrain from hunting wild waterfowl or feeding their birds wild waterfowl meat or organ tissue. More information is available at ODFW’s falconry webpage. Oregon has 130 licensed falconers.
Wildlife managers will continue to test wild birds in Oregon for avian influenza. For more information on avian influenza in wild birds, visit USGS National Wildlife Health Center: http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_inform ... influenza/
Hunters: practice safe bird handling
The strain of avian influenza found in Oregon and other western states is no immediate threat to human health. But hunters should always practice safe bird handling and cooking techniques:
 Wear rubber or latex gloves when handling and cleaning game birds.
 Do not eat, drink, smoke or touch your face when handling birds.
 Keep the game bird and its juices away from other foods.
 Thoroughly clean knives and any other equipment or surfaces that touch birds. Use a solution of one-third cup of chlorine bleach per one gallon of water.
 Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after handling birds (or with alcohol-based hand products if your hands are not visibly soiled).
 Cook all game meat thoroughly (up to at least 165° F) to kill disease organisms and parasites. Use a food thermometer to ensure the inside of the bird has reached at least 165° F.
Upland bird and waterfowl (duck, goose) hunting seasons are open through Jan. 25, 2015 in Oregon. Goose hunting is also open in parts of the state during late January, February and March.
Danger to domestic poultry
This strain of the flu (H5N2) is deadly to domestic birds (chickens, turkeys, Guinea fowl). The Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) strongly encourages backyard poultry producers to prevent contact between their birds and wild birds. Any sick domestic birds should be reported to the State Veterinarian’s office at 1-800-347-7028 or USDA at 1-866-536-7593.
ODFW is part of the State of Oregon’s multi-agency response to highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza, along with the Oregon Department of Agriculture, the Oregon Health Authority and the US Department of Agriculture’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS).
For information on avian influenza in domestic birds, visit ODA’s website: http://bit.do/ORbirdflu.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 10:49 pm 
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Government Ag Teams Encircle New Washington Bird Flu Case
By ANNA KING • 1 HOUR AGO

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The USDA says owners of backyard flocks should keep their birds separated from wild ones.
ANNA KING NORTHWEST NEWS NETWORK

Listen Listening...


Three new hot spots of bird flu have been found in wild ducks and domestic birds in Idaho.
A second Oregon case was confirmed last week in a wild duck near Eugene. And a flock of 118 birds was euthanized over the weekend in Port Angeles, Washington.

Government agriculture workers have taken out several large infected backyard flocks -- some with more than 100 birds.

Port Angeles is the newest target zone for government bird swabbing. And officials from the state and the USDA are finding a lot of small backyard flocks there. Some samples could come back with lab results as early as this weekend.

Idaho has stepped up its surveillance of backyard flocks and wild birds as well.

All of these Northwest cases are thought to stem from wild waterfowl flyways that pass over our region. Backyard flock owners are reminded by the USDA to keep their birds separated from wild ones. Commercial poultry and egg producers are on high alert to keep the viruses off their farms.

It’s all bad news for poultry exports -- with four key countries banning poultry and eggs from the U.S.

Jim Sumner, president of the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council, said some poultry companies are losing as much as $500,000 in trade a week. He added that some chicken parts are worth way more outside the U.S. than in it -- like chicken feet.

“Companies are starting to send those to the rendering plant for two or three cents a pound instead of the 90 cents a pound that they were previously getting for them in China,” he said.

Sumner said it could take months or even years for trade to resume in some of these countries. And he said countries like China are already finding replacement imports.

The USDA says these particular bird flu strains are not harmful to humans.

http://boisestatepublicradio.org/post/g ... um=twitter

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 21, 2015 2:05 pm 
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Quarantine set in Clallam County to control poultry movement

OLYMPIA – The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has adopted an emergency rule to establish a quarantine zone in Clallam County, covering an area of approximately six miles around a site between Port Angeles and Sequim where avian influenza was confirmed in a backyard flock of mixed poultry and other birds.

This is the second avian influenza quarantine established in the state, with the other quarantine zone covering parts of Benton and Franklin counties. The quarantines restrict the movement of eggs, poultry or poultry products within and out of the identified zones with exemptions made for operations that obtain special permits and meet specific criteria. Visit www.agr.wa.gov/lawsrules/rulemaking to see the complete rule adopted today and a detailed map of the quarantine in Clallam County.

On Friday, Jan. 16, WSDA received test results confirming the backyard flock in Clallam County was infected with the H5N2 avian influenza virus, the same strain of the virus found in a pintail duck in Whatcom County on Dec. 16, 2014 and in two backyard flocks in Benton County. The owner of the Port Angeles flock contacted WSDA after a goose died last week and other birds in the flock exhibited symptoms consistent with avian influenza.

On Sunday, Jan. 18, WSDA and a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) team of veterinarians responded to the Clallam County flock to humanely euthanize the remaining birds. The team will now work to clean and disinfect the site and do surveillance in poultry in the surrounding area.

This is the third instance in Washington state of avian influenza in a domestic flock. However, the virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in Washington or the United States. Washington’s commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing program and WSDA conducts weekly surveillance testing and health inspections at live bird markets in the state.

Because migratory wild waterfowl populations can carry the disease, particularly the highly-pathogenic strains of avian influenza (H5N2 and H5N8), WSDA is encouraging bird owners to protect their domestic birds from contact with wild waterfowl and remain vigilant in their biosecurity measures.

There is no immediate public health concern due to the avian influenza virus detected, however public health officials routinely contact owners of infected flocks as a precaution. Avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat. As always, both wild and domestic poultry should be properly cooked.

Deaths or illness among domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. For wild birds, contact the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 23, 2015 12:55 pm 
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Highly pathogenic avian influenza,
United States of America

Information received on 22/01/2015 from Dr John Clifford, Deputy Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, United States of America
Summary
Report type Follow-up report No. 3
Date of start of the event 10/12/2014
Date of pre-confirmation of the event 15/12/2014
Report date 22/01/2015
Date submitted to OIE 22/01/2015
Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence 2004
Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Serotype H5N2
Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to a defined zone within the country
Related reports Immediate notification (16/12/2014)
Follow-up report No. 1 (07/01/2015)
Follow-up report No. 2 (13/01/2015)
Follow-up report No. 3 (22/01/2015)
New outbreaks (3)
Outbreak 1 Canyon County, Canyon, IDAHO
Date of start of the outbreak 07/01/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Backyard
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 26 4 4
Affected population The affected premises are a small backyard poultry flock of chickens and two ducks which are periodically allowed to range freely.
Outbreak 2 Clallam County, Clallam, WASHINGTON
Date of start of the outbreak 08/01/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Backyard
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 100 3 3 97
Affected population The affected premises are a small mixed free-range backyard flock of geese, ducks, and chickens that are allowed access to the outdoors and regularly exposed to wild migratory waterfowl.
Outbreak 3 Lane County, Lane, OREGON
Date of start of the outbreak 12/01/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Not applicable
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Mallard:Anas platyrhynchos(Anatidae)
Affected population Hunter harvested wild mallard duck.
Summary of outbreaks Total outbreaks: 3
Total animals affected
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 126 7 7 97
Mallard:Anas platyrhynchos(Anatidae) **
Outbreak statistics
Species Apparent morbidity rate Apparent mortality rate Apparent case fatality rate Proportion susceptible animals lost*
Birds 5.56% 5.56% 100.00% **
Mallard:Anas platyrhynchos(Anatidae) ** ** ** **
*Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
**Not calculated because of missing information
Epidemiology
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
Contact with wild species
Epidemiological comments The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), in conjunction with State Departments of Agriculture and Wildlife, are continuing to conduct a comprehensive epidemiological investigation and enhanced surveillance (including wild bird surveillance of hunter harvested birds) in response to the HPAI H5N2 wild bird related event. All backyard premises have been quarantined and enhanced active surveillance is being initiated in and around the backyard flocks Novel avian influenza virus of Eurasian origin (EA-H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4) spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014. Introduction of this EA-H5N8 virus into the Pacific Flyway sometime during 2014 has allowed mixing with North American (AM) lineage viruses and generated new combinations with genes from both EA and AM origin (or “reassortant” viruses) such as this EA/AM H5N2-reassortant detected in Canada and the US. These findings are not unexpected as the EA-H5N8 virus continues to circulate. The EA-H5 clade 2.3.4.4 viruses are highly pathogenic for poultry. The HPAI EA/AM H5N2-reassortant virus has NOT been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the United States.
Control measures
Measures applied
Stamping out
Quarantine
Movement control inside the country
Disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)
Vaccination prohibited
No treatment of affected animals
Measures to be applied
No other measures
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory name and type Species Test Test date Result
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Mallard real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 12/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Mallard virus sequencing 12/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 16/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 16/01/2015 Positive
Future Reporting
The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid ... rtid=17030

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