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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 5:49 pm 
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Utah DoAg cites confirmation of H5N8 in hunter killed wigeon in Davis County.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 5:56 pm 
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Utah Detects Avian Influenza in Waterfowl

The state of Utah has activated a multi-agency response plan following the confirmation of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in a wild bird in Davis County. The avian influenza virus strain H5N8 was confirmed by the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa in an American widgeon duck, on Jan. 9, 2015. Several other wild birds taken by hunters near the Great Salt Lake in Davis County are also undergoing tests.

There is no immediate public health concern due to the recent detection of the avian influenza virus.

“This discovery of avian influenza in a wild bird is not unexpected, considering that Utah sits in a major migratory bird flight path,” said Dr. Warren Hess, Acting State Veterinarian with the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food. “The possibility of the disease being transmitted to domestic backyard bird flocks remains high, and we advise bird owners to take extra biosecurity measures to protect their flocks.”

High Pathogenic Avian Influenza was recently found in wild or domestic birds in California, Oregon and Washington. The avian influenza strains involved have not been implicated in any human infection to date. The USDA states that all poultry, poultry products and wild birds are safe to eat as long as they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit .

The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the US. Surveillance for avian influenza is ongoing in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets, and in migratory wild bird populations.

The UDAF is advising commercial poultry growers and backyard flock owners to be vigilant with biosecurity measures and surveillance.

“We have not diagnosed avian influenza in Utah’s domestic poultry population, but the presence of the virus in migratory waterfowl poses a potential risk to our backyard poultry,” Dr. Hess says. “This event underscores the importance of biosecurity for backyard bird owners. We strongly encourage owners to eliminate any contact between their birds and wild birds. We also want them to monitor their flock closely and report sick birds.”

Backyard flock owners and domestic poultry owners can report sick birds to the State Veterinarian’s office at 1-801-538-4910 or by calling the USDA toll free at 1-866-536-7593. Also, if anyone finds wild bird carcasses that are not near power poles or roads, and that involve five or more carcasses of the following species, please contact the DWR: Waterfowl, shorebirds, raptors, scavengers such as crows and ravens, as well as quail and turkeys. Sick and dead wild birds should be reported to a local DWR office or by calling 801 538-4700.

The DWR is advising hunters to take routine precautions when handling game, including wearing latex or rubber gloves when cleaning birds, washing their hands with soapy water after cleaning, cleaning and disinfecting equipment and surfaces that come in contact with wild birds (e.g. washing with soapy water and disinfecting with a 10 percent chlorine bleach solution), and cooking wild birds thoroughly before eating the meat.

Utah’s commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing program. In addition, the DWR routinely conducts mortality surveillance of wild bird populations. The HPAI virus has not currently been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the United States.

The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food (UDAF) is working closely with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, and the Utah Health Department, and the US Department of Agriculture’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS).

Detailed information for backyard bird owners is available here.

USDA website for keeping birds healthy.

##

Contact: Larry Lewis (801) 538-7104
Cell (801) 514-2152
Dr. Warren Hess: (801) 538-4910
DWR - Mark Hadley (801) 538-4737





posted: January 13, 2015

http://ag.utah.gov/home/news/509-high-p ... n-flu.html

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 6:11 pm 
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US Flyways
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 6:15 pm 
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H5N8 map update

https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid= ... 2tn8&hl=en

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 6:23 pm 
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Officials confirm cases of bird flu in Utah waterfowl
POSTED 2:17 PM, JANUARY 13, 2015, BY ASHTON EDWARDS

DAVIS COUNTY, Utah – Health officials have confirmed cases of bird flu in Utah waterfowl.

The National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirmed avian influenza virus strain H5N8 in an American widgeon duck on Jan. 9 in Davis County.

Authorities said other wild birds from the area near the Great Salt Lake in Davis County are also undergoing tests.

According to officials, there is no immediate public health concern.

“This discovery of avian influenza in a wild bird is not unexpected, considering that Utah sits in a major migratory bird flight path,” Dr. Warren Hess said, Acting State Veterinarian with the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food. “The possibility of the disease being transmitted to domestic backyard bird flocks remains high and we advise bird owners to take extra biosecurity measures to protect their flocks.”

Health officials said High Pathogenic Avian Influenza has recently been found in wild or domestic birds in California, Oregon and Washington.

The avian influenza strains involved have not been implicated in any human infection to date, health officials said.

The USDA states that all poultry, poultry products and wild birds are safe to eat as long as they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit .

The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the US.

Officials said surveillance for avian influenza is ongoing in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.

The UDAF is advising commercial poultry growers and backyard flock owners to be vigilant with biosecurity measures and surveillance.

“We have not diagnosed avian influenza in Utah’s domestic poultry population but the presence of the virus in migratory waterfowl poses a potential risk to our backyard poultry,” Dr. Hess said. “This event underscores the importance of biosecurity for backyard bird owners. We strongly encourage owners to eliminate any contact between their birds and wild birds. We also want them to monitor their flock closely and report sick birds.”

Backyard flock owners and domestic poultry owners can report sick birds to the State Veterinarian’s office at 1-801-538-4910 or by calling the USDA toll free at 1-866-536-7593.

Also, if anyone finds wild bird carcasses that are not near power poles or roads, and that involve five or more carcasses of the following species, the DWR asks you to contact them: Waterfowl, shorebirds, raptors, scavengers such as crows and ravens, as well as quail and turkeys.

Sick and dead wild birds should be reported to a local DWR office or by calling (801) 538-4700.

The DWR is advising hunters to take routine precautions when handling game, including wearing latex or rubber gloves when cleaning birds, washing their hands with soapy water after cleaning, cleaning and disinfecting equipment and surfaces that come in contact with wild birds (e.g. washing with soapy water and disinfecting with a 10 percent chlorine bleach solution), and cooking wild birds thoroughly before eating the meat.

http://fox13now.com/2015/01/13/official ... waterfowl/

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 6:39 pm 
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Nearby Bear River National Migratory Bird Refuge

http://www.fws.gov/nwrs/threecolumn.aspx?id=2147484822

December - January - February
These three months have the lowest average Refuge bird populations, at less than 24,000. Throughout the winter months, Refuge wetlands go through an almost constant cycle of freezing and thawing. The freeze usually encourages many of the Refuge’s waterfowl species, such as the northern shoveler, northern pintail, gadwall, and tundra swan, to migrate further south. If a solid freeze occurs, most of the tundra swans will leave the Great Salt Lake Valley and finish the winter on the delta of the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers in California.
Small numbers of waterfowl will remain on the Refuge during these months and include such species as tundra swan, mallard, bufflehead, and common goldeneye. Raptors present during winter include bald eagle, golden eagle, rough- legged hawk, northern harrier and prairie falcon. Peregrine falcon may also be present. In February, red-winged black- birds begin to sing!

http://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/Monthly%20Bird%20Happenings%20-%20Bear%20River%20Refuge%20-%20Utah.pdf


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 7:44 pm 
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SALT LAKE CITY — State wildlife officials say they've detected a case of the bird flu in a duck that was hunted in Davis County.

The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food says test results show an American widgeon duck had the H5N8 strain of the flu. Other birds found near the Great Salt Lake in Davis County are also being tested. So far, none have been found with the flu.

Officials say there is no immediate health threat for people.

But, they are warning domestic bird owners to take steps to protect their animals since the flu strain can be transmitted from wild birds.

State wildlife officials are also warning hunters to wear gloves while handling birds and wash their hands thoroughly.

Cases of the bird flu have been detected in several other Western states.

From: http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/7 ... vis-County

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 9:28 pm 
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Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/01131 ... _Utah.html

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 15, 2015 2:35 pm 
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ublished Date: 2015-01-15 12:35:17
Subject: PRO/AH/EDR> Avian influenza (09): USA (UT) H5N8, wild duck
Archive Number: 20150115.3094193
AVIAN INFLUENZA (09): USA (UTAH) H5N8, WILD DUCK
************************************************
A ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org
ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Date: Tue 13 Jan 2015
Source: Desert News [edited] http://www.deseretnews.com/article/8656 ... ounty.html


[Utah] state wildlife officials say they've detected a case of the bird flu in a duck that was hunted in Davis County.

The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food says test results show an American widgeon duck had the H5N8 strain of the flu. Other birds found near the Great Salt Lake in Davis County are also being tested. So far, none have been found with the flu.

Officials say there is no immediate health threat for people.

But, they are warning domestic bird owners to take steps to protect their animals since the flu strain can be transmitted from wild birds.

State wildlife officials are also warning hunters to wear gloves while handling birds and wash their hands thoroughly.

Cases of the bird flu have been detected in several other Western states.

--
Communicated by:
ProMED-mail from HealthMap Alerts
<promed@promedmail.org>

[Aquatic wild birds are the natural reservoirs of low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) viruses. Before the emergence of highly pathogenic AI (HPAI) H5N1 almost a decade ago, the general rule was that LPAI could mutate to HPAI when infecting domestic fowl, generating outbreaks that were always associated with domestic birds. Wild birds deaths were restricted to those in the vicinity of affected farms. It is thought that Asian HPAI H5N1 is found in a very small number of species (presumably belonging to the genus _Anas_) in which it could be perpetuated. These species would suffer long subclinical viremia which enables them to migrate and carry it to novel regions. H5N1 is still there causing troubles but it never reached the Americas.

Early in 2014, a new HPAI with similar ability to propagate globally appeared: H5N2. In November it reached Europe and on 16 Dec 2014 it was found in the USA. In addition, an H5N2 HPAI virus was identified in a wild northern pintail (_Anas acuta_) in the same county of Washington state in the US as the 1st case of H5N8 HPAI. This virus has the same Eurasian H5 gene as the H5N8 HPAI viruses but an N2 gene from a North American wild waterfowl low pathogenic avian influenza virus, which suggests it is circulating among wild birds; but the route of entrance and mechanisms of spread need to be investigated.

Ecoepidemiological studies, surveillance in domestic and wild birds, as well as strengthening biosecurity practices should be encouraged.

For more information go to http://www.offlu.net/fileadmin/home/en/ ... _Final.pdf. - Mod.PMB

The state of can be located on the HealthMap/ProMED-mail interactive map at http://healthmap.org/promed/p/5568. Davis County can be seen on the map at http://geology.com/county-map/utah-county-map.gif. - Sr.Tech.Ed.MJ]
See Also
Avian influenza (08): USA (CA) HPAI H5N8, wild bird 20150115.3093306
Avian influenza (02): USA (WA) HPAI H5N2, backyard flock 20150110.3083028
Avian influenza (01): USA (WA) backyard poultry, HPAI H5N2, OIE 20150109.3082193
2014
----
Avian influenza (112): USA (WA) wild birds, HPAI H5N8, H5N2 20141218.3040607
Avian influenza (110): USA (WA) wild birds, HPAI H5N8, H5N2, OIE 20141217.3037995
Avian influenza (108): USA (WA) H5N2, H5N8, wild birds 20141217.3038018
Avian influenza (68): USA (NJ) poultry, LPAI, H7, OIE 20140829.2731960
Avian influenza (55): USA (CA) poultry, LPAI, H5 20140425.2428504
Avian influenza (54): USA (CA) poultry, LPAI, H5, OIE 20140423.2424661
2013
----
Avian influenza (71): USA (AR) poultry, LPAI H7N7 20130620.1782674
Avian influenza (04): USA (NY) H5 LPAI, poultry, RFI for N-type 20130115.1498109
2012
----
Avian influenza (13): USA (MA) LPAI, swan 20120208.1036521
Avian influenza (08): USA (MA) LPAI, swan 20120203.1031447
.................................................sb/pmb/mj/lm

http://www.promedmail.org/direct.php?id=3094193

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2015 11:32 pm 
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CAUTION URGED FOR THOSE HANDLING BIRDS
CHEYENNE – The confirmation of a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza in other western states has prompted a warning from Wyoming officials to be on the lookout for birds that may exhibit symptoms of the disease. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department and the State Veterinarian also ask that those handling birds or who own birds to use caution.

Most of the confirmations have been in the Pacific Northwest, but on January 9, 2015 the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Iowa confirmed an American widgeon taken by a Utah hunter was positive for the influenza virus strain H5N8. Several other birds taken by hunters near the Great Salt Lake are also undergoing tests.

Utah is in the Pacific Flyway for waterfowl and the part of Wyoming west of the Continental Divide is also in the Pacific Flyway. Highly pathogenic avian influenza was also recently found in wild and domestic birds in Washington, Oregon and California; but at this point has not affected the commercial poultry industry in these locations. The disease has not been implicated in any human infection in the US, to date, and has not been found in Wyoming. Officials say there is no immediate human health concern due to the recent detection of the virus in other states.

"Finding the H5N8 strain of the Avian Influenza virus in wild birds in Utah after previously finding the disease in migratory wild birds in Oregon and Washington is a concern,” said State Veterinarian, Jim Logan. “Although there is no immediate threat to domestic birds in Wyoming, we advise domestic poultry owners – commercial and backyard flocks - to take precautions to prevent their birds from having any contact or exposure with wild birds. Avian influenza can be transmitted to domestic bird flocks from infected wild birds.”

Avian influenza H5N8 is a reportable disease in Wyoming. Owners of domestic poultry and veterinarians are encouraged to report signs of sick or dead birds to the State Veterinarian’s office at (307) 857 4140 or the USDA’s APHIS Wyoming office at (307) 432 7960 for diagnostic and epidemiologic evaluation. If individuals find dead wild birds in the field, they can call their local game warden, wildlife biologist or Game and Fish office. Owners of private game bird farms and falconers should contact Game and Fish personnel with any concerns.

Proper handling and cooking includes routine precautions like wearing latex or rubber gloves when cleaning birds, washing hands with soapy water after cleaning, cleaning and disinfecting equipment and surfaces that come in contact with wild birds (for example, washing with soapy water and disinfecting with a 10 percent chlorine bleach solution), and cooking wild birds thoroughly before eating the meat. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that birds are safe to eat as long as they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees.

Avian influenza (commonly called “bird flu”) is a viral infection found in a wide variety of domestic and wild birds. While most avian influenza viruses rarely cause clinical signs in wild waterfowl, HPAI occasionally can cause disease and mortality in wild birds.Additionally, the avian influenza virus can be transmitted to birds of prey from all ducks (including sea ducks), geese, swans, seabirds (alcids, fulmar, cormorants and grebes), cranes and herons. Waterfowl can be reservoirs for avian influenza strains that can be fatal to domestic poultry, therefore backyard and commercial poultry raised near areas associated with high waterfowl use are at risk of transmission.

In a sick bird, clinical signs may include edema or swelling of the head, nasal discharge, neurologic signs (circling, lack of coordination), depression or other signs of illness. Birds such as crows, ravens, magpies, gulls, raptors, owls, or avian species that would potentially scavenge or predate upon/eat waterfowl/seabirds could be candidates for infection.

http://www.basinsradio.com/Caution-Urge ... s/20742785

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