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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 8:37 pm 
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USDA cites H5 HPAI outbreak at Benton City Washington.

H5N2 confirmed

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 8:38 pm 
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For immediate release: Jan. 2, 2015 Contact: Hector Castro (360) 902-1815



WSDA activates avian influenza response plan in Benton County

OLYMPIA – The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has activated a multi-agency response plan following the confirmation of highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza in domestic birds in Benton County. WSDA will work closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) in this response.
There is no immediate public health concern due to the avian influenza virus detected. Avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat. As always, both wild and domestic poultry should be properly cooked.
The H5 avian influenza virus was confirmed by the Washington State University’s Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman. It was found in birds from a backyard poultry flock near Benton City. The flock of approximately 150 birds includes domestic waterfowl with access to the outdoors. There is also a pond on the premises frequented by migratory birds. The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in Washington or the United States.
The bird owner contacted WSDA after experiencing the loss of nearly 50 birds in the past week. The virus is similar to the virus found in a Washington captive gyrfalcon last month, although additional testing is being conducted to further identify the strain of the disease.
WSDA is advising commercial poultry growers and backyard flock owners to be vigilant with biosecurity measures and surveillance.
“We have a vigorous response plan but this development demonstrates how important good biosecurity can be, especially for backyard bird owners,” state veterinarian Dr. Joe Baker said. “We have not diagnosed the virus anywhere else in our domestic poultry population, but the presence of the virus in migratory waterfowl is a risk to backyard poultry. One step owners should take is preventing contact between their birds and wild birds.”
Washington’s commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing program and WSDA conducts weekly surveillance testing and health inspections at live bird markets in the state. Deaths or illness among domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. For wild birds, contact the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.
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http://agr.wa.gov/News/2015/15-01.aspx

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 8:58 pm 
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 9:02 pm 
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Avian flu detected in Benton City backyard flock
BY KRISTI PIHL
Tri-City Herald
January 2, 2015

Tri-City area backyard chickens and other domestic poultry may be at risk of catching a deadly avian flu after the disease was detected among a backyard flock in Benton City.

It’s the first time that avian flu has been detected in a domestic flock in Washington state.

The migratory flock of 150 birds included chickens, turkeys and waterfowl that had access to the outdoors and a nearby pond also used by migratory wild birds, said Hector Castro, the Department of Agriculture’s communications manager.

After nearly 50 of the birds died in one week, the Benton City resident contacted the state Department of Agriculture. Washington State University’s Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman confirmed that the Benton City birds had H5 avian influenza virus earlier this week.

Humans are not at risk from avian flu, Castro. Meat and eggs from infected birds remain safe to eat.

But this particular strain of influenza is considered highly pathogenic and deadly to poultry, Castro said. Poultry that catch the disease likely will die within three days.

Kennewick, Richland and Pasco all allow residents to own backyard chickens, but the numbers are limited to three to five.

Backyard chickens and poultry owners should restrict the access their birds have with wild birds, Castro said. Many birds migrate through the Tri-City area, and there are plenty of bodies of water and wildlife refuges where wild birds and waterfowl congregate.

“Wild birds can really be carriers of this disease,” he said.

Many times, wild birds may not even get sick, but can spread it to poultry, Castro said.

Typical symptoms that owners may notice include respiratory issues, coughing or sneezing, lower egg production, decreases in appetite,and swelling on combs or waddle.

“The best thing people can do is make sure they are running a clean operation and take the basic steps to make sure they are controlling access to their birds so these type of diseases do not get passed on,” Castro said.

The state and U.S. Departments of Agriculture are working on a plan of how to respond to the flu diagnosis, Castro said. A USDA lab is running more tests to determine the specific strain of avian influenza.

Typically, the rest of the flock would be euthanized and tests would be run on birds in other domestic flocks in the area to make sure the disease does not spread, he said.

Losing the birds can be very traumatic, but it’s critical to make sure the highly contagious disease doesn’t spread to anyone else’s flock, he said.

“The owners are being very cooperative,” Castro said.

The virus is similar to the one found in a Whatcom County captive gyrfalcon that had been fed wild duck last month. Oregon also is dealing with avian influenza found in a Douglas County backyard flock of guinea fowl and chickens.

The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the U.S.

Most commercial operations keep their birds contained and test them regularly, Castro said. They have a huge financial incentive to keep their birds healthy.

And the commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing program. Inspectors from the State Department of Agriculture perform weekly testing and health inspections at live bird markets in the state.

Deaths or illness of domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. For wild birds, call the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.

For more information about avian influenza and steps backyard poultry owners can take, go to agr.wa.gov.

Read more here: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2015/01/0 ... rylink=cpy

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 9:05 pm 
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WSDA Activates Avian Influenza Response Plan in Benton County

Posted: Jan 02, 2015 7:45 PM EST
Updated: Jan 02, 2015 7:47 PM EST
Posted by Jonathan HalvorsonCONNECT



OLYMPIA, WA – The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has activated a multi-agency response plan following the confirmation of highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza in domestic birds in Benton County. WSDA will work closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal Plant Health Inspection Service in this response.

The WSDA says there is no immediate public health concern due to the avian influenza virus detected. Avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat.

The H5 avian influenza virus was confirmed by the Washington State University's Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman. It was found in birds from a backyard poultry flock near Benton City. The flock of approximately 150 birds includes domestic waterfowl with access to the outdoors. There is also a pond on the premises frequented by migratory birds. The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in Washington or the United States.

The bird owner contacted WSDA after experiencing the loss of nearly 50 birds in the past week. The virus is similar to the virus found in a Washington captive gyrfalcon last month, although additional testing is being conducted to further identify the strain of the disease.

WSDA is advising commercial poultry growers and backyard flock owners to be vigilant with biosecurity measures and surveillance.

“We have a vigorous response plan but this development demonstrates how important good biosecurity can be, especially for backyard bird owners,” state veterinarian Dr. Joe Baker said.
“We have not diagnosed the virus anywhere else in our domestic poultry population, but the presence of the virus in migratory waterfowl is a risk to backyard poultry. One step owners should take is preventing contact between their birds and wild birds.”

Washington's commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing program and WSDA conducts weekly surveillance testing and health inspections at live bird markets in the state. Deaths or illness among domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. For wild birds, contact the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.

http://www.nbcrightnow.com/story/277506 ... um=twitter

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 9:11 pm 
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Avian flu detected in Benton City backyard flock
BY KRISTI PIHL
Tri-City HeraldJanuary 2, 2015 Updated 57 minutes ago
FacebookTwitterGoogle PlusMoreLINKEDINREDDITYOUTUBEE-MAILPRINTORDER A REPRINT OF THIS STORY






Tri-City area backyard chickens and other domestic poultry may be at risk of catching a deadly avian flu after the disease was detected among a backyard flock in Benton City.

It’s the first time that avian flu has been detected in a domestic flock in Washington state.

The migratory flock of 150 birds included chickens, turkeys and waterfowl that had access to the outdoors and a nearby pond also used by migratory wild birds, said Hector Castro, the Department of Agriculture’s communications manager.

After nearly 50 of the birds died in one week, the Benton City resident contacted the state Department of Agriculture. Washington State University’s Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman confirmed that the Benton City birds had H5 avian influenza virus earlier this week.

Humans are not at risk from avian flu, Castro. Meat and eggs from infected birds remain safe to eat.

But this particular strain of influenza is considered highly pathogenic and deadly to poultry, Castro said. Poultry that catch the disease likely will die within three days.

Kennewick, Richland and Pasco all allow residents to own backyard chickens, but the numbers are limited to three to five.

Backyard chickens and poultry owners should restrict the access their birds have with wild birds, Castro said. Many birds migrate through the Tri-City area, and there are plenty of bodies of water and wildlife refuges where wild birds and waterfowl congregate.

“Wild birds can really be carriers of this disease,” he said.

Many times, wild birds may not even get sick, but can spread it to poultry, Castro said.

Typical symptoms that owners may notice include respiratory issues, coughing or sneezing, lower egg production, decreases in appetite,and swelling on combs or waddle.

“The best thing people can do is make sure they are running a clean operation and take the basic steps to make sure they are controlling access to their birds so these type of diseases do not get passed on,” Castro said.

The state and U.S. Departments of Agriculture are working on a plan of how to respond to the flu diagnosis, Castro said. A USDA lab is running more tests to determine the specific strain of avian influenza.

Typically, the rest of the flock would be euthanized and tests would be run on birds in other domestic flocks in the area to make sure the disease does not spread, he said.

Losing the birds can be very traumatic, but it’s critical to make sure the highly contagious disease doesn’t spread to anyone else’s flock, he said.

“The owners are being very cooperative,” Castro said.

The virus is similar to the one found in a Whatcom County captive gyrfalcon that had been fed wild duck last month. Oregon also is dealing with avian influenza found in a Douglas County backyard flock of guinea fowl and chickens.

The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the U.S.

Most commercial operations keep their birds contained and test them regularly, Castro said. They have a huge financial incentive to keep their birds healthy.

And the commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing program. Inspectors from the State Department of Agriculture perform weekly testing and health inspections at live bird markets in the state.

Deaths or illness of domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. For wild birds, call the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.

For more information about avian influenza and steps backyard poultry owners can take, go to agr.wa.gov.

Kristi Pihl: 509-582-1512; kpihl@tricityherald.com; Twitter: @KristiAPihl

Read more here: http://www.theolympian.com/2015/01/02/3 ... rylink=cpy

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 9:20 pm 
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Bird Flu found in Benton City backyard ducks
By KEPRTV.com & KIMATV.com Staff Published: Jan 2, 2015 at 5:04 PM PST

Bird Flu found in Benton City backyard ducks
WASHINGTON STATE DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE NEWS RELEASE -- The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has activated a multi-agency response plan following the confirmation of highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza in domestic birds in Benton County. WSDA will work closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) in this response.

There is no immediate public health concern due to the avian influenza virus detected. Avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat. As always, both wild and domestic poultry should be properly cooked.

The H5 avian influenza virus was confirmed by the Washington State University’s Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman. It was found in birds from a backyard poultry flock near Benton City. The flock of approximately 150 birds includes domestic waterfowl with access to the outdoors. There is also a pond on the premises frequented by migratory birds. The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in Washington or the United States.

The bird owner contacted WSDA after experiencing the loss of nearly 50 birds in the past week. The virus is similar to the virus found in a Washington captive gyrfalcon last month, although additional testing is being conducted to further identify the strain of the disease.

WSDA is advising commercial poultry growers and backyard flock owners to be vigilant with biosecurity measures and surveillance.

“We have a vigorous response plan but this development demonstrates how important good biosecurity can be, especially for backyard bird owners,” state veterinarian Dr. Joe Baker said. “We have not diagnosed the virus anywhere else in our domestic poultry population, but the presence of the virus in migratory waterfowl is a risk to backyard poultry. One step owners should take is preventing contact between their birds and wild birds.”

Washington’s commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing program and WSDA conducts weekly surveillance testing and health inspections at live bird markets in the state. Deaths or illness among domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. For wild birds, contact the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 9:28 pm 
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Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
niman wrote:
Bird Flu found in Benton City backyard ducks
By KEPRTV.com & KIMATV.com Staff Published: Jan 2, 2015 at 5:04 PM PST

Bird Flu found in Benton City backyard ducks
WASHINGTON STATE DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE NEWS RELEASE -- The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has activated a multi-agency response plan following the confirmation of highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza in domestic birds in Benton County. WSDA will work closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) in this response.

There is no immediate public health concern due to the avian influenza virus detected. Avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat. As always, both wild and domestic poultry should be properly cooked.

The H5 avian influenza virus was confirmed by the Washington State University’s Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman. It was found in birds from a backyard poultry flock near Benton City. The flock of approximately 150 birds includes domestic waterfowl with access to the outdoors. There is also a pond on the premises frequented by migratory birds. The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in Washington or the United States.

The bird owner contacted WSDA after experiencing the loss of nearly 50 birds in the past week. The virus is similar to the virus found in a Washington captive gyrfalcon last month, although additional testing is being conducted to further identify the strain of the disease.

WSDA is advising commercial poultry growers and backyard flock owners to be vigilant with biosecurity measures and surveillance.

“We have a vigorous response plan but this development demonstrates how important good biosecurity can be, especially for backyard bird owners,” state veterinarian Dr. Joe Baker said. “We have not diagnosed the virus anywhere else in our domestic poultry population, but the presence of the virus in migratory waterfowl is a risk to backyard poultry. One step owners should take is preventing contact between their birds and wild birds.”

Washington’s commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing program and WSDA conducts weekly surveillance testing and health inspections at live bird markets in the state. Deaths or illness among domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. For wild birds, contact the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.

http://www.kimatv.com/news/local/Bird-F ... um=twitter

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 9:48 pm 
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Bird flu virus has been found in domestic birds in Benton County, state says
POSTED 5:41 PM, JANUARY 2, 2015, BY Q13 FOX NEWS STAFF

OLYMPIA — Bird flu has been discovered in domestic birds in Benton County, the Washington State Department of Agriculture announced Friday.

“There is no immediate public health concern due to the avian influenza virus detected,” the department said. “Avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat. As always, both wild and domestic poultry should be properly cooked.”

It said the H5 avian flu virus was found in birds from a backyard poultry flock near Benton City. The flock of about 150 birds includes domestic waterfowl with access to the outdoors, it said, and it noted there is also a pond on the land that is frequented by migratory birds.

“The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in Washington or the United States,” the department said.

It added that the bird owner contacted the department after nearly 50 of his birds died in the past week.

The department said it had activated a multi-agency response plan and will work closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service in this case.

On Dec. 16, the USDA confirmed two different strains of H5 avian flu virus had been found in wild birds in Whatcom County.

The Washington State Department of Agriculture said deaths or illness among domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. For wild birds, contact the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.

http://q13fox.com/2015/01/02/bird-flu-v ... tate-says/

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 11:40 pm 
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Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/01031 ... enton.html

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