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PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 7:09 pm 
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Delaware Department of Agriculture and DE Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control issued a press release warning of H5N8 and H5N2, but claim that wild birds carry low path that occasionally changes to high path on farms.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 7:09 pm 
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Precautions, vigilance urged for avian influenza
Date Posted: Wednesday, December 24th, 2014
Categories: Department of Agriculture DNREC

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DOVER – Delaware authorities are urging poultry and bird owners to be vigilant in the wake of avian influenza cases reported in Oregon and Washington state.

“Though it’s far away at the moment, we know that avian influenza can spread rapidly,” said Delaware State Veterinarian Dr. Heather Hirst, who heads the Delaware Department of Agriculture’s Poultry and Animal Health Section. “Poultry growers and owners of backyard flocks can do their part by taking proper biosecurity precautions to prevent against the spread of the disease.”

There are no immediate public health concerns due to the West Coast cases, and avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat. Delaware’s commercial poultry industry has a strong and active avian influenza surveillance program, and works in close contact with the Delaware Department of Agriculture, the University of Delaware, and other partners.

Avian influenza spreads bird-to-bird through saliva, feces, and other bodily fluids. Since many species of wild waterfowl can carry and shed influenza virus in feces without showing any signs of illness, it is extremely important to make a strong effort to keep domestic birds separated from wild waterfowl and to keep domestic birds off waterways where wild waterbirds live.

“Low pathogenic forms of avian influenza naturally occur in wild birds such as waterfowl, shorebirds and gulls, and in most cases cause no signs of infection or only mild symptoms,” said Rob Hossler, Wildlife Administrator for the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control’s Division of Fish and Wildlife. “However, when domestic species and wildlife intermix, occasionally a high pathogenic form can develop which can cause increased mortality to one or both of the groups.”

While the Washington and Oregon strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) has not been found in commercial poultry in the United States, Hirst said its detection in a backyard poultry flock and captive gyrfalcons on the West Coast makes monitoring of backyard flocks and other birds extremely important.

“All bird or poultry owners can implement basic biosecurity steps to keep their flocks healthy and safe,” Hirst said. “Reporting sick or dead birds is especially critical to keeping avian influenza from spreading.”

Biosecurity measures recommended by the Delaware Department of Agriculture include isolating birds from visitor and other birds; keeping shoes, tools, equipment, vehicles and cages clean when entering area where birds live; avoiding tracking wild waterfowl feces into domestic bird living areas; avoiding sharing equipment and tools with neighbors; watching for warning signs of disease; and reporting sick or dead birds.

Sick or dead domestic birds, including backyard flocks and commercial poultry, should be reported to the Delaware Department of Agriculture’s Poultry and Animal Health Section, (302) 698-4500 or (800) 282-8685 (Delaware only). To report groups of dead or sick waterfowl, shorebirds or gulls, contact DNREC’s Wildlife Section – Wildlife Disease Program, 302-735-3600.

For more information on backyard bird flock biosecurity, visit http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov/.

# # #

Media contact:
Dan Shortridge
Chief of Community Relations
Delaware Department of Agriculture
302-698-4520
daniel.shortridge@state.de.us

http://news.delaware.gov/2014/12/24/pre ... influenza/

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 7:12 pm 
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National
Delaware officials urge vigilance against avian flu

By Associated Press December 24 at 2:12 PM
DOVER, Del. — State agriculture officials are urging poultry and bird owners to be vigilant after avian flu was reported in Oregon and Washington state.

State Veterinarian Dr. Heather Hirst said in a news release on Wednesday that while there are no immediate concerns in Delaware, avian flu can spread quickly.

She recommends that owners keep shoes, tools, equipment, vehicles and cages clean when entering areas where birds live and avoiding tracking wild waterfowl feces into domestic bird living areas.



Sick or dead domestic birds, including backyard flocks and commercial poultry, should be reported to the Delaware Department of Agriculture’s Poultry and Animal Health Section.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/ ... story.html

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 7:17 pm 
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Del. Urging Vigilance Against Avian Flu
Posted: Dec 24, 2014 1:08 PM EST



DOVER, Del. – Delaware authorities are urging poultry and bird owners to be vigilant after avian influenza cases were reported in Oregon and Washington state.

"Though it's far away at the moment, we know that avian influenza can spread rapidly," said Delaware State Veterinarian Dr. Heather Hirst, who heads the Delaware Department of Agriculture's Poultry and Animal Health Section. "Poultry growers and owners of backyard flocks can do their part by taking proper biosecurity precautions to prevent against the spread of the disease."

Officials said there are no immediate public health concerns due to the West Coast cases, and avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat.

Avian influenza spreads bird-to-bird through saliva, feces, and other bodily fluids. Since many species of wild waterfowl can carry and shed influenza virus in feces without showing any signs of illness, officials said it is extremely important to make a strong effort to keep domestic birds separated from wild waterfowl and to keep domestic birds off waterways where wild waterbirds live.

"Low pathogenic forms of avian influenza naturally occur in wild birds such as waterfowl, shorebirds and gulls, and in most cases cause no signs of infection or only mild symptoms," said Rob Hossler, wildlife administrator for the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control's Division of Fish and Wildlife. "However, when domestic species and wildlife intermix, occasionally a high pathogenic form can develop which can cause increased mortality to one or both of the groups."

While the Washington and Oregon strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) has not been found in commercial poultry in the United States, Hirst said its detection in a backyard poultry flock and captive gyrfalcons on the West Coast makes monitoring of backyard flocks and other birds extremely important.

"All bird or poultry owners can implement basic biosecurity steps to keep their flocks healthy and safe," Hirst said. "Reporting sick or dead birds is especially critical to keeping avian influenza from spreading."

Biosecurity measures recommended by the Delaware Department of Agriculture include isolating birds from visitor and other birds; keeping shoes, tools, equipment, vehicles and cages clean when entering area where birds live; avoiding tracking wild waterfowl feces into domestic bird living areas; avoiding sharing equipment and tools with neighbors; watching for warning signs of disease; and reporting sick or dead birds.

Sick or dead domestic birds, including backyard flocks and commercial poultry, should be reported to the Delaware Department of Agriculture's Poultry and Animal Health Section, (302) 698-4500 or (800) 282-8685 (Delaware only). To report groups of dead or sick waterfowl, shorebirds or gulls, contact DNREC's Wildlife Section – Wildlife Disease Program, (302) 735-3600.

For more information on backyard bird flock biosecurity, visit http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov/.

http://www.wboc.com/story/27703237/del- ... u-outbreak

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 9:16 pm 
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Del. warns of avian flu spread after 2 states see virus

By Tom Lehman 3:55pm, December 24, 2014

State agriculture officials are urging poultry and bird owners to be vigilant after avian flu was reported in Oregon and Washington state.

State Veterinarian Dr. Heather Hirst said in a news release on Wednesday that while there are no immediate concerns in Delaware, avian flu can spread quickly.

She recommends that owners keep shoes, tools, equipment, vehicles and cages clean when entering areas where birds live and avoiding tracking wild waterfowl feces into domestic bird living areas.

Sick or dead domestic birds, including backyard flocks and commercial poultry, should be reported to the Delaware Department of Agriculture's Poultry and Animal Health Section.
http://www.wdel.com/story.php?id=65007& ... um=twitter

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 25, 2014 5:08 am 
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With bird flu on West Coast, Del. urges vigilance
robin brown, The News Journal 9:18 p.m. EST December 24, 2014

An avian flu outbreak in the Pacific Northwest has sparked concern for Delaware’s $927.7 million-a-year poultry industry.

Following reports of avian influenza cases in Oregon and Washington state, Delaware agricultural officials on Wednesday urged urged owners of poultry and other birds in the state to “be vigilant.”

“Though it’s far away at the moment, we know that avian influenza can spread rapidly,” Delaware State Veterinarian Heather Hirst said in a statement.

“Poultry growers and owners of backyard flocks can do their part by taking proper biosecurity precautions to prevent against the spread of the disease,” said Hirst, who heads the state Department of Agriculture’s Poultry and Animal Health Section.

Recommended measures include keeping shoes, tools, equipment, vehicles and cages clean when entering area where birds live and avoiding sharing tools or equipment and tracking wild waterfowl feces into domestic bird living areas. Owners also are urged to watch for warning signs of disease and report sick or dead birds.

Since many species of wild waterfowl can carry and shed influenza virus in feces without showing any signs of illness, owners also are urged to keep domestic birds separated from wild waterfowl and keep domestic birds off waterways where wild waterbirds live, state agricultural officials said.

Some forms of avian flu occur naturally among wild birds including waterfowl, with mild or no symptoms, said Wildlife Administrator Rob Hossler of the state Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control’s Division of Fish and Wildlife.

“However,” he said in a statement, “when domestic species and wildlife intermix, occasionally a high pathogenic form can develop which can cause increased mortality to one or both of the groups.”

The flu – transferred between birds through bodily fluid and feces – can spread quickly requiring destruction of entire flocks. So even word of cases elsewhere in the country gets the attention of growers here.

Last year, they produced 215.6 million birds, up 1.6 percent from 2012, according to National Agricultural Statistics Service data. With that growth, the production value also rose, from $752.6 million to $927.7 million.

While the strain of avian flu reported in Washington and Oregon has not been found in commercial poultry, Hirst said, its detection in a backyard poultry flock and captive gyrfalcons makes monitoring backyard flocks and other birds extremely important.

“Reporting sick or dead birds is especially critical to keeping avian influenza from spreading,” she said.

Sick or dead domestic birds in Delaware, including backyard flocks and commercial poultry, should be reported to the state agricultural department’s Poultry and Animal Health Section at (302) 698-4500 or (800) 282-8685. Groups of sick or dead waterfowl, shorebirds or gulls should be reported to DNREC’s Wildlife Disease Program at (302) 735-3600.

State officials stressed there is no immediate public health concern in Delaware because of the West Coast cases, state officials said, noting that avian flu does not affect eggs or poultry meat, adding they “remain safe to eat.”

This article contains material from staff reporter Jeff Montgomery.

Contact robin brown at (302) 324-2856 or rbrown@delawareonline.com. Find her on Facebook and follow her on Twitter @rbrowndelaware.

http://www.delawareonline.com/story/new ... /20885937/

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 25, 2014 6:23 am 
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USDA Reports Isolated Avian Influenza Cases in Washington State
RALEIGH, N.C. — The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission has been advised that avian influenza was detected recently in the northwestern United States, but there is no evidence of an immediate threat to North Carolina wild bird populations.

Avian influenza is an infectious disease caused by viruses that occur naturally among wild aquatic birds worldwide. It can infect domestic poultry, as well as other bird and animal species. Avian flu viruses do not normally infect people; however, rare cases of human infection have occurred.

“There is absolutely no cause for alarm but we must acknowledge the federal report,” said Dr. Maria Palamar, wildlife veterinarian with the Wildlife Commission. “The probability of avian influenza occurring in North Carolina is low.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture issued a news release on Dec. 17 that two separate strains of the H5 virus were identified in northern pintail ducks and a gyrfalcon in Washington state near the Canadian border. Neither virus has been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the United States and no human cases with these viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada or internationally. The USDA outlined ways to prevent contamination in its news release.

Although the H5 virus can be lethal to individual waterfowl, only a few large die-offs have occurred in the wild. Wildlife biologists will continue to monitor migratory bird populations.

http://outdoornewsdaily.com/usda-report ... ton-state/

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