Rhiza Labs FluTracker Forum

The place to discuss the flu
It is currently Wed Oct 18, 2017 8:04 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 12:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
USDA press release indicates H5N2 was detected linked to waterfowl die off at Wiser Lake. H5N8 would in symptomatic falcons fed wild birds.

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 12:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Release No. 0273.14
Contact:
APHIS Press Office: Joelle Hayden (301) 851-4040
Lyndsay Cole (970) 494-7410
USGS Press: Catherine Puckett (352) 377-2469
CDC Press: (404) 639-3286

Printable version
Email this page Email this page



Highly Pathogenic H5 Avian Influenza Confirmed in Wild Birds in Washington State H5N2 Found in Northern Pintail Ducks & H5N8 Found in Captive Gyrfalcons
Neither virus found in commercial poultry in U.S.; no public health concern at this time
WASHINGTON, Dec. 17, 2014 — The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic (HPAI) H5 avian influenza in wild birds in Whatcom County, Washington. Two separate virus strains were identified: HPAI H5N2 in northern pintail ducks and HPAI H5N8 in captive Gyrfalcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds. Neither virus has been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the United States and no human cases with these viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada or internationally. There is no immediate public health concern with either of these avian influenza viruses.

Both H5N2 and H5N8 viruses have been found in other parts of the world and have not caused any human infection to date. While neither virus has been found in commercial poultry, federal authorities with the U.S. Department of Agriculture also emphasize that poultry, poultry products and wild birds are safe to eat even if they carry the disease if they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

The finding in Whatcom County was reported and identified quickly due to increased surveillance for avian influenza in light of HPAI H5N2 avian influenza outbreaks in poultry affecting commercial poultry farms in British Columbia, Canada. The northern pintail duck samples were collected by officials from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife following a waterfowl die-off at Wiser Lake, Washington, and were sent to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center for diagnostic evaluation and initial avian influenza testing. The U.S. Department of the Interior's USGS, which also conducts ongoing avian influenza testing of wild bird mortality events, identified the samples as presumptive positive for H5 avian influenza and sent them to USDA for confirmation. The gyrfalcon samples were collected after the falconer reported signs of illness in his birds.

Following existing avian influenza response plans, USDA is working with the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as well as State partners on additional surveillance and testing of both commercial and wild birds in the nearby area.

Wild birds can be carriers of HPAI viruses without the birds appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

HPAI would have significant economic impacts if detected in U.S. domestic poultry. Commercial poultry producers follow strict biosecurity practices and raise their birds in very controlled environments. Federal officials emphasize that all bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue practicing good biosecurity. This includes preventing contact between your birds and wild birds, and reporting sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through your state veterinarian or through USDA's toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.

CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds to be low because (like H5N1) these viruses do not now infect humans easily, and even if a person is infected, the viruses do not spread easily to other people.

Avian influenza (AI) is caused by influenza type A viruses which are endemic in some wild birds (such as wild ducks and swans) which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese and guinea fowl). AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or "H" proteins, of which there are 17 (H1–H17), and neuraminidase or "N" proteins, of which there are 10 (N1–N10). Many different combinations of "H" and "N" proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity—the ability of a particular virus to produce disease in domestic chickens.

For more information visit the USDA avian influenza page and the USDA APHIS avian influenza page. For more information on avian influenza and wild birds, please visit the USGS National Wildlife Health Center.

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usd ... donly=true

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Map update

http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usd ... donly=true

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Avian flu in ducks, falcons in Washington state but officials say no health threat
Print Lynne Terry | lterry@oregonian.com By Lynne Terry | lterry@oregonian.com

on December 17, 2014 at 8:03 AM

U.S. officials have found two highly contagious avian flu strains in wild birds in Washington state but they said the birds do not pose a public health threat.

The H5N2 strain was found in northern pintail ducks and H5N8 turned up in gyrfalcons in Whatcom County, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The strains have never appeared in commercial poultry in the United States and there have not been any human cases involving these strains worldwide.

Wild birds -- and all poultry -- need to be handled safely and cooked to 165 degrees Fahrenheit to kill harmful pathogens, including viruses.

U.S. officials have increased surveillance for avian influenza following outbreaks affecting commercial poultry in British Columbia, where tens of thousands of chickens and turkeys have been killed to control the virus. It can wipe out flocks in days.

Washington state Department of Fish and Wildlife officials collected northern pintail duck samples following a waterfowl die-off at Wiser Lake. The gyrfalcon samples were collected after a falconer reported signs of illness in his birds.

-- Lynne Terry

http://www.oregonlive.com/health/index. ... ns_in.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Immediate notification report
Report reference: REF OIE 16759, Report Date: 16/12/2014, Country : United States of America
Report Summary
Name of sender of the report Dr John Clifford Telephone (1-202) 799-7146
Position Deputy Administrator Fax (1-202) 799-7146
Address Room # 317-E
Jamie L. Whitten Federal Building
1400 Independence Ave, SW
Washington, DC 20250 Washington 20250
Email John.Clifford@aphis.usda.gov
Date submitted to OIE 16/12/2014
Animal type Terrestrial Date of report 16/12/2014
Disease Highly pathogenic avian influenza Date of start of the event 10/12/2014
Causal Agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus Date of pre-confirmation of the
event
14/12/2014
Serotype(s) H5N8 Date of last occurrence 2004
Reason Reoccurrence of a listed disease Diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
Country or zone a zone or compartment Clinical signs Yes
Number of reported outbreaks submitted= 1, Draft= 0
Outbreak details
State Number of outbreaks County Unit Type Location Latitude Longitude Start Date End Date:
WASHINGTON- (this
report - submitted)
- Whatcom Not applicable Whatcom County 48.98 -122.47 10/12/2014
Species Measuring units Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Gyrfalcon:Falconidae(Fal
co rusticolus)
Animals ... ... ... ... ...
Affected Population Captive wild gyrfalcon
Outbreak summary: Total outbreaks = 1 (Submitted)
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Gyrfalcon
Epidemiology
Epidemiological comments
As a precaution and in response to the recent HPAI outbreak in Canada, surveillance of poultry premises and of wild bird mortality events was enhanced by the USDA, and State personnel along the United States - Canadian Border. Through this surveillance, highly pathogenic avian
influenza (HPAI) H5 was identified in wild birds. Two serotypes were identified on enhanced surveillance, both with amino acid sequence at the HA cleavage site consistent with HPAI, H5N8 and H5N2. H5N8 was identified in a captive wild gyrfalcon that was fed hunter killed
wild birds from Whatcom County, Washington and H5N2 was identified in a wild pintail duck also from Whatcom County, Washington. Based upon direct sequencing from gyrfalcon specimens, an avian influenza subtype H5N8 of Eurasian lineage (partial H5 99% similarity to
A/coot/Korea/H81/2014 and partial N8 99% similarity to A/Baikal teal/Korea/H41/2014). The amino acid sequence at the hemagglutinin cleavage site is consistent with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI).
Preliminary data suggests that these virus strains (H5N2 and H5N8) may be related with the H5N8 strain potentially representing the progenitor; however further analysis is needed. Neither of these viruses has been found in any poultry in the United States. These H5N8 and H5N2
detections involve only wild birds. Further investigation and characterization of the HPAI viruses is ongoing.
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
• Unknown or inconclusive
Measures applied
No Control Measures
Animals treated Vaccination Prohibited
No Yes
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory Type Name of Laboratory Species Test Type Date Results Provided Result
National laboratory National Veterinary Services
Laboratories (NVSL)
Gyrfalcon gene sequencing Pending
National laboratory National Veterinary Services
Laboratories (NVSL)
Gyrfalcon virus isolation 15/12/2014 Positive
Printed on: Tue Dec 16 19:56:57 CET 2014 Page 1/3Laboratory Type Name of Laboratory Species Test Type Date Results Provided Result
National laboratory National Veterinary Services
Laboratories (NVSL)
Gyrfalcon real-time reverse
transcriptase/polymerase chain
reaction (RRT-PCR)
14/12/2014 Positive
National laboratory National Veterinary Services
Laboratories (NVSL)
Gyrfalcon haemagglutination (HA) test 14/12/2014 Positive
Future Reporting
The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.
http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/temp/reports ... 195657.pdf

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Immediate notification report
Report reference: REF OIE 16771, Report Date: 16/12/2014, Country : United States of America
Report Summary
Name of sender of the report Dr John Clifford Telephone (1-202) 799-7146
Position Deputy Administrator Fax (1-202) 799-7146
Address Room # 317-E
Jamie L. Whitten Federal Building
1400 Independence Ave, SW
Washington, DC 20250 Washington 20250
Email John.Clifford@aphis.usda.gov
Date submitted to OIE 16/12/2014
Animal type Terrestrial Date of report 16/12/2014
Disease Highly pathogenic avian influenza Date of start of the event 10/12/2014
Causal Agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus Date of pre-confirmation of the
event
15/12/2014
Serotype(s) H5N2 Date of last occurrence 2004
Reason Reoccurrence of a listed disease Diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
Country or zone a zone or compartment Clinical signs Yes
Number of reported outbreaks submitted= 1, Draft= 0
Outbreak details
State Number of outbreaks County Unit Type Location Latitude Longitude Start Date End Date:
WASHINGTON- (this
report - submitted)
- Whatcom Not applicable Whatcom County 48.9 -122.48 10/12/2014
Species Measuring units Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Northern
Pintail:Anatidae(Anas
acuta)
Animals ... ... ... ... ...
Affected Population Wild pintail ducks
Outbreak summary: Total outbreaks = 1 (Submitted)
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Northern Pintail
Epidemiology
Epidemiological comments
As a precaution and in response to the recent HPAI outbreak in Canada, surveillance of poultry premises and of wild bird mortality events was enhanced by the USDA, and State personnel along the United States - Canadian Border. Through this surveillance, highly pathogenic avian
influenza (HPAI) H5 was identified in wild birds. Two serotypes were identified on enhanced surveillance, both with amino acid sequence at the HA cleavage site consistent with HPAI, H5N8 and H5N2. H5N8 was identified in a captive wild gyrfalcon that was fed hunter killed
wild birds from Whatcom County, Washington and H5N2 was identified in a wild pintail duck also from Whatcom County, Washington. Preliminary analysis suggests this H5N2 is similar to the HPAI identified in the current Canadian outbreak. Based upon sequence attempt from a
virus isolate, an avian influenza subtype H5 of Eurasian lineage (partial HA 98% similarity to A/bean goose/Korea/H40/2014) and N2 of US wild bird lineage (partial NA 98% similarity to A/American green-winged teal/California/HKWF609/2007); the amino acid sequence at the
hemagglutinin cleavage site is consistent with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI).
Preliminary data suggests that these virus strains (H5N2 and H5N8) may be related with the H5N8 strain potentially representing the progenitor; however further analysis is needed. Neither of these viruses has been found in any poultry in the United States. These H5N8 and H5N2
detections involve only wild birds. Further investigation and characterization of the HPAI viruses is ongoing.
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
• Unknown or inconclusive
Measures applied
No Control Measures
Animals treated Vaccination Prohibited
No Yes
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory Type Name of Laboratory Species Test Type Date Results Provided Result
Printed on: Tue Dec 16 20:14:44 CET 2014 Page 1/3Laboratory Type Name of Laboratory Species Test Type Date Results Provided Result
National laboratory National Veterinary Services
Laboratories (NVSL)
Northern Pintail real-time reverse
transcriptase/polymerase chain
reaction (RRT-PCR)
15/12/2014 Positive
National laboratory National Veterinary Services
Laboratories (NVSL)
Northern Pintail virus isolation 15/12/2014 Positive
National laboratory National Veterinary Services
Laboratories (NVSL)
Northern Pintail haemagglutination (HA) test 15/12/2014 Positive
National laboratory National Veterinary Services
Laboratories (NVSL)
Northern Pintail gene sequencing Pending

http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/temp/reports ... 201444.pdf

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 2:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Bird flu found in wild birds in Washington state - USDA
Source: Reuters - Wed, 17 Dec 2014 17:18 GMT
Author: Reuters

Dec 17 (Reuters) - Two strains of avian influenza have been confirmed in wild birds in Washington state, near the U.S. border with Canada, but there is no immediate cause for public health concerns, U.S. agriculture officials said on Wednesday.

Two separate virus strains were identified in Whatcom County, Washington, including H5N2 in northern pintail ducks, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) said in a statement.

This same strain has killed thousands of birds on two Canadian farms in British Columbia. The other strain, H5N8, was found in captive gyrfalcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds, the USDA said.

Neither virus has been found in U.S. commercial poultry, and no human cases with these viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada or internationally, the USDA said.

"There is no immediate public health concern with either of these avian influenza viruses," the statement said.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there was an outbreak of H5N2 virus in a flock of chickens in Texas in 2004. That was the first U.S. outbreak of the virus in 20 years and no transmission of the virus to humans was reported at the time.

The H5N1 bird flu, which severely affected poultry in Asia, became a worldwide concern because in 2003 it was more easily spread among humans. (Reporting by Julie Ingwersen in Chicago; Editing by Tom Brown)

http://www.trust.org/item/20141217171700-yvwtt/?

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 2:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Bird flu found in wild birds in Washington state: USDA
43 Mins Ago
The Associated Press

Two strains of avian influenza have been confirmed in wild birds in Washington state, near the U.S. border with Canada, but there is no immediate cause for public health concerns, U.S. agriculture officials said on Wednesday.

Two separate virus strains were identified in Whatcom County, Washington, including H5N2 in northern pintail ducks, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) said in a statement.

This same strain has killed thousands of birds on two Canadian farms in British Columbia. The other strain, H5N8, was found in captive gyrfalcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds, the USDA said.

Neither virus has been found in U.S. commercial poultry, and no human cases with these viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada or internationally, the USDA said.

"There is no immediate public health concern with either of these avian influenza viruses,'' the statement said.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said there was an outbreak of H5N2 virus in a flock of chickens in Texas in 2004. That was the first U.S. outbreak of the virus in 20 years and no transmission of the virus to humans was reported at the time.

The H5N1 bird flu, which severely affected poultry in Asia, became a worldwide concern because in 2003 it was more easily spread among humans.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/102264500?

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 3:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/12171 ... Wiser.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 3:50 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
National Wildlife Health Center
Wildlife Health Bulletin 2014-05
Detection of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses
H5N2 and H5N8 in Wild Birds of the United States
To: Natural Resource/Conservation Managers
From: Dr. Jonathan Sleeman, Center Director, USGS National Wildlife Health Center
Date: December 16, 2014
This Bulletin provides information on the current situation regarding the recent detection of highly pathogenic
avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) H5N2 and H5N8 in wild and captive birds in the United States. Following
reports of recent outbreaks of HPAIV in poultry in British Columbia, Canada, the Washington Department of Fish
and Wildlife together with the USGS National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) and the US Department of
Agriculture’s (USDA) Wildlife Services investigated a waterfowl mortality event on Wiser Lake in Whatcom
County, Washington adjacent to the affected area in Canada. Mortality of a captive gyrfalcon that had recently
been fed waterfowl meat from the area was also investigated. Gross examinations and microbiological culture
analyses of the waterfowl carcasses indicated aspergillosis in several of the birds. In addition, virology analyses
conducted in collaboration with the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratories confirmed the presence of
HPAIV H5 avian influenza in two of the birds.
Two separate virus strains were identified: HPAIV H5N2 in a wild northern pintail duck (Anas acuta) and
HPAIV H5N8 in a captive gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) that was fed wild waterfowl from this site. Both viruses
have been determined to have an amino acid sequence at the hemagglutinin cleavage site consistent with HPAIV.
Preliminary data suggest that these virus strains (H5N2 and H5N8) may be related to an HPAIV H5N8 previously
known to have circulated during 2014 among wild birds and poultry (chickens and ducks) in Asia and Western
Europe. Wild bird species known to be infected with HPAIV H5N8 and a timeline of major HPAIV H5N8 events
during 2014 are summarized in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. The novel H5N2 and H5N8 detections in the United
States that are described in this Bulletin only involve free-ranging and captive wild birds, and further investigation
and characterization of the HPAIVs is ongoing. Neither of these viruses has been found in commercial poultry
anywhere in the United States.
Table 1. Wild birds known to be infected with HPAIV H5N8 during 2014.
Common Name Scientific Name Status
Baikal teal Anas formosa Dead
Bean goose Anser fabalis Dead
Eurasian coot Fulica atra Dead
Common (Eurasian) teal Anas crecca Live
Gyrfalcon Falco rusticolus Dead
Hooded crane Grus monacha Dead
Mallard Anas platyrhynchos Live
Spot-billed duck Anas poecilorhyncha Live
Tundra swan Cygnus columbianus Dead
White-naped crane Grus vipio Dead
Eurasian wigeon Anas penelope Live
Table 2. Timeline of major HPAIV H5N8 events during 2014.
Date (2014) Event Country
1/15–5/8 161 poultry farms and 20 additional wild birds tested positive S. Korea
4/11 1 poultry farm in Kuma-gun, Kumamoto prefecture Japan
7/27 Last farm in South Korea infected with H5N8 HPAIV S. Korea
9/3 Korean H5N8 outbreak is officially declared over; 14 million poultry culled S. Korea
9/12 Fecal sample from the Laio River, Panjin City, Liaoning province China
9/12 Duck sample from a slaughterhouse in Panjin City, Liaoning province China
11/3 1 of 2 whooper swans that died near Yasugi-shi, Shimane prefecture Japan
11/4 Turkey fattening farm in Heintichwalde, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania Germany
11/14 Layer farm in Hekendorn, Utrecht province Netherlands
11/14 Duck breeding farm in Nafferton, East Riding, Yorkshire England
11/17 Common (Eurasian) teal, Island of Rugen, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania Germany
11/18 Fecal sample from unidentified wild bird in Chosei, Chiba prefecture Japan
11/18 Fecal sample from 'duck' in Tottori, Tottori prefecture Japan
11/19 Chicken farm in Ter Aar, Zuid-Holland province Netherlands
11/21 2 farms in Kamperveen, Overijssel province (Index + adjacent farm) Netherlands
11/29 White-naped crane, Izumi, Kagoshima prefecture Japan
11/30 Layer farm in Zoeterwoude, Zuid-Holland province Netherlands
12/1 Eurasian wigeon fecal samples, Kamerik, Utretch province Netherlands
12/10 Hooded crane, Izumi, Kagoshima prefecture Japan
12/10 Wild and captive birds, Whatcom County, Washington State USA
12/14 Poultry, Nobeoka-shi, Kitagawa-machi, Miyazaki prefecture Japan
12/15 Fattening turkey holding facility, Porto Viro, Rovigo, Veneto Italy
The NWHC is continuing to monitor for HPAIV by testing sick and dead migratory birds. In an effort to
maximize early detection of HPAIV and to understand the spatial extent and species involvement of H5 HPAIV
in North America, wildlife managers should remain vigilant for wild bird morbidity and mortality events and
continue to submit carcasses from any events that meet the criteria described below.
Submission criteria:
1) Mortality events of any size involving waterfowl (ducks, geese and swans) or other water birds (loons, grebes,
coots, shorebirds or wading birds such as egrets/herons).
2) Mortality events of any size involving North American avian scavenger species (raptors, ravens, crows, or
gulls), particularly those observed near locations with on-going waterbird mortality.
3) Mortality events involving single- or multiple bird species where estimated total mortality exceeds 500 birds.
4) Other examples of events that warrant investigation include mortality events involving any wild bird species
occurring in close proximity to poultry operations, or mortality events associated with captive birds that have
been imported from countries where H5 or H7 HPAIVs are known to occur.
NWHC will also test for HPAIV in other species when the circumstances of disease outbreaks, including rapid
mortality progression or pathologic findings, suggest that avian influenza may be a factor.
These criteria may be revised in the future as more information on pathogen distribution is obtained from
enhanced HPAIV surveillance efforts. NWHC will continue submitting samples to the USDA’s National
Veterinary Services Laboratories for confirmatory testing and for mortality events exceeding 500 birds.
There has to date been no evidence of HPAIV H5N2- or H5N8-related illness in humans, but appropriate hygiene
measures should be observed when handling wild birds. Recommended hygiene measures and useful links are
also provided below.
Additional Information:
OIE: Questions and Answers on Highly Pathogenic H5N8 Avian Influenza strain
Scientific Task Force on Avian Influenza and Wild Birds statement on H5N8 HPAI in Poultry and Wild Birds
NWHC Avian Influenza Information
USDA Avian Influenza Information
USDA Biosecurity for Birds
Recommendations:
Hunters should follow these routine precautions when handling game:
 Do not handle or eat sick game.
 Wear rubber or disposable latex gloves while handling and cleaning game.
 Wash hands and thoroughly clean knives, equipment and surfaces that come into contact with game.
 Do not eat, drink or smoke while handling animals.
 All game should be thoroughly cooked (internal temperature of 165 °F).
Field biologists handling sick or dead birds associated with a mortality event should:
 Wear rubber, latex, or nitrile gloves that can be disinfected or discarded and protective eyewear or a face
shield while handling animals.
 Wear protective clothing, including coveralls and rubber boots.
 Minimize respiratory exposure by wearing a respirator/mask (NIOSH N95 or better).
 Wash hands often and disinfect work surfaces and equipment before travelling between sites.
 Do not eat, drink, or smoke while handling animals.
 Properly dispose of potentially infectious material including carcasses. For additional information see the
USGS Field Manual of Wildlife Diseases.
 Additional health and safety information can be found using the following link:
http://www.doi.gov/emergency/employeeem ... LY2014.pdf
Disease Investigation Services
To request diagnostic services or report wildlife mortality, please contact the NWHC at 608-270-2480 or by email
at NWHC-epi@usgs.gov, and a field epidemiologist will be available to discuss the case. To report wildlife
mortality events in Hawaii or Pacific Island territories, please contact the Honolulu Field Station at 808-792-9520
or email Thierry Work at thierry_work@usgs.gov. Further information can be found at
http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/services/.
Wildlife Mortality Reporting and Diagnostic Submission Request Form
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the scientific and technical services the NWHC provides, please
do not hesitate to contact NWHC Director Jonathan Sleeman at 608-270-2401, jsleeman@usgs.gov.
To see past Wildlife Health Bulletins, click here.
WILDLIFE HEALTH BULLETINS are distributed to natural resource/conservation agencies to provide and promote information
exchange about significant wildlife health threats. If you would like to be added to or removed from the mailing list for these bulletins,
please contact Gail Moede Rogall at 608-270-2438 or e-mail: nwhcoutreachdb@usgs.gov.

http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/publications/w ... 5_H5N8.pdf

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 27 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 71 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group