Rhiza Labs FluTracker Forum

The place to discuss the flu
It is currently Thu Oct 19, 2017 1:58 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 5:53 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
The withholding of the H5N2 sequence data, including the cleavage site and the lineage, puts the region at significant risk because Fraser Valley farms continue to graze outdoors, increasing likelihood of infection by wild birds.

The release of Fujian sequences would leave little doubt that wild birds are the source of the growing problem.

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 5:53 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
UPDATE: Avian flu means turmoil for Chilliwack poultry farmers – Virus found on more farms
Image
CFIA workers at Fraser Valley Duck and Goose in Yarrow in November 2005 when 70,000 birds had to be culled.— Image Credit: Times/File

by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 10, 2014 at 12:00 PM— updated Dec 10, 2014 at 1:22 PM
Image
While so far just one Chilliwack poultry producer is directly affected by the recent H5N2 avian influenza outbreak, the impact is felt by all.

“A finding of notifiable avian influenza (H5 or H7 strains) is very difficult for an infected farm owner, and for poultry producers in general,” said Ken Falk, owner of Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry in Yarrow.

“It essentially throws an otherwise orderly and structured industry into turmoil/chaos.”

And Falk should know as his operation was hit hard in both 2004 when the entire Fraser Valley was decimated with avian flu, but again in 2005 when his operation, then known as Fraser Valley Duck and Goose, was hit again.

He’s still frustrated about 2005 when a low pathogenic strain hit his ducks, which are a host adapted species, meaning they did not become symptomatic. As a result of Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) rules implemented after 2004, Falk had to cull 70,000 otherwise healthy birds.

Falk said the CFIA made mistakes in 2004 when it came to containment and they made mistakes later when it came to compensation. He’s been told the programs work now, and he hopes he doesn’t have to test them.

Most recently the CFIA said the entire southern half of British Columbia is now part of an avian influenza “primary control zone,” as a result of an outbreak of the disease on farms in Chilliwack and Abbotsford.

The H5N2 strain was found first at one farm in Chilliwack and one farm in Abbotsford. A few days later two more farms were added to the quarantine list.

On Wednesday, the CFIA reported avian flu was found on two more chicken farms in Abbotsford, and in another barn on an original site. That second barn is a separate business so is treated by the CFIA as a standalone case. The brings the total number of affected farms to eight.

All farms are within eight kilometres of each other.
Image
“Any kind of movement out of the primary control zone will be monitored,” CFIA chief veterinary officer Dr. Harpreet Kochhar said at a technical briefing Monday.

More than 155,000 chickens and turkeys on farms in Chilliwack and Abbotsford have either died from the highly pathogenic H5N2 strain, or have been euthanized.

Kochhar said the creation of a primary control zone is supported by poultry farmers, but will impact the industry. The reason for the zone, he said, is to protect animal health, control disease spread and to minimize trade disruptions outside of the zone.

The move comes as more countries announce a ban on poultry and poultry products from the area. The United States chief veterinarian announced a ban on live and raw poultry from B.C. Bans of varying degrees—as specific as the Fraser Valley and as broad as all of Canada—are now in place from Mexico, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and South Africa.

The CFIA continues to investigate the source of the disease, but suspicion is squarely on migratory birds.

Some poultry farmers have not been keen to chat about the current outbreak, deferring instead to the BC Poultry Association.

The Times contacted the

Chilliwack farmer whose 13,000 birds had to be euthanized last week, but Chris den Hertog said he preferred not to comment at this time.

Walter Dyck, president of the Chilliwack Agriculture Commission and a poultry farmer for decades, too, deferred comments to the association.

Falk at Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry was forthcoming with his feeling that the government and CFIA did not respond well in 2004. He does try to remain optimistic, however, about the lessons learned.

“Just over one week into the control/eradication efforts and we are faced with a lot more questions than answers,” Falk told the Times. “It will be very difficult for all producers in the coming weeks, but we are committed to work together to bring this to a successful conclusion.”

Certified organic turkey producers Jeff and Carrie Hooge in Greendale are watching their outdoor grazing animals closely.

“We are taking every precautionary measure that we can to prevent the avian influenza from coming into contact on our farm, while still proving an environment in which we can raise our turkeys ethically and while abiding 100 per cent by the Canadian Organic standards,” Carrie said in an email. “We know that lots of Chilliwack residents are passionate about eating local, and we are happy to be able to provide an organic, local and ethical option for their Christmas feast.”

http://www.chilliwacktimes.com/news/285402861.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 5:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
niman wrote:
UPDATE: Avian flu means turmoil for Chilliwack poultry farmers – Virus found on more farms
Image
CFIA workers at Fraser Valley Duck and Goose in Yarrow in November 2005 when 70,000 birds had to be culled.— Image Credit: Times/File

by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 10, 2014 at 12:00 PM— updated Dec 10, 2014 at 1:22 PM

Certified organic turkey producers Jeff and Carrie Hooge in Greendale are watching their outdoor grazing animals closely.

“We are taking every precautionary measure that we can to prevent the avian influenza from coming into contact on our farm, while still proving an environment in which we can raise our turkeys ethically and while abiding 100 per cent by the Canadian Organic standards,” Carrie said in an email. “We know that lots of Chilliwack residents are passionate about eating local, and we are happy to be able to provide an organic, local and ethical option for their Christmas feast.”

http://www.chilliwacktimes.com/news/285402861.html

The above comments by a turkey producer in Greendale in Chilliwack, north of the H5N2 confirm Chilliwack farm, raises concerns that wild birds will continue to expand the outbreak.

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 6:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
General Principles and Management Standards
PDF Version (374Kb)

CAN/CGSB-32.310-2006
Amended October 2008, December 2009 and June 2011

Introduction (Informative)
Description
General Principles of Organic Production
Organic Practices
<snip>

6.8.1 The operator of an organic livestock operation shall establish and maintain animal living-conditions that accommodate the health and natural behaviour of all animals, including

access to the outdoors, shade, shelter, rotational pasture, exercise areas, fresh air and natural daylight suitable to the species, its stage of production, the climate and the environment;
access to fresh water and high-quality feed in accordance with the needs of the animal;
sufficient space and freedom to lie down in full lateral recumbency, stand up, stretch their limbs and turn freely, and express normal patterns of behaviour;
space allowances appropriate to local conditions, feed production capacity, livestock health, nutrient balance of livestock and soils, and environmental impact;
production techniques that foster the long-term health of livestock, especially where animals are required to provide a high level of production or rate of growth;
air quality including moisture and dust content shall not prejudice the well-being of the herd/flock;
livestock housing shall have non-slip floors. The floor shall not be entirely of slatted or grid construction. Buildings shall have areas for bedding and resting that are sufficiently large, solidly built, comfortable, clean and dry. They shall be covered with a thick layer of dry bedding that can absorb excrement. Where bedding material is typically consumed by the animal species, it shall conform to the feed requirements of this standard. Where bedding is not typically consumed by the animal species (e.g. lactating dairy cows), straw used for the bedding shall be free from the application of substances prohibited by par. 1.4.1 for at least 60 days prior to harvest.
livestock housing with non-slip floors. The floor shall not be entirely of slatted or grid construction. Solid flooring is preferred but where nonslip slatted floors exist, the floor design shall ensure that the foot of the smallest animal cannot be caught in a void. Areas between the voids shall be at least the width of the foot of the animals. Buildings shall have areas for bedding and resting that are sufficiently large, solidly built, comfortable, clean and dry. They shall be covered with a thick layer of dry bedding that can absorb excrement. When a production unit is unable to source sufficient organic bedding and a reasonable regional search has been conducted, involving potential known organic suppliers, bedding material not produced from genetic engineering and free from the application of substances prohibited by par. 1.4.1 for at least 60 days prior to harvest, may be used.
the management of runs and the grazing management of pasture shall be designed to avoid soil degradation, long term damage to vegetation or water contamination.
6.8.2 The operator of an organic livestock operation may provide temporary confinement for livestock owing to

inclement weather;
animal's stage of production;
conditions where the health, safety or well-being of the animal could be jeopardized given its stage of production;
risks relating to soil, water or plant quality.

http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/ongc-cgsb/ ... .html#a078

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 6:33 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
LOCUS DQ309440 317 bp RNA linear VRL 27-DEC-2005
DEFINITION Influenza A virus (A/duck/BritishColumbia/CN26-6/05(H5N2))
hemagglutinin gene, partial cds.
ACCESSION DQ309440
VERSION DQ309440.1 GI:83817209
KEYWORDS .
SOURCE Influenza A virus (A/duck/BritishColumbia/CN26-6/05(H5N2))
ORGANISM Influenza A virus (A/duck/BritishColumbia/CN26-6/05(H5N2))
Viruses; ssRNA negative-strand viruses; Orthomyxoviridae;
Influenzavirus A.
REFERENCE 1 (bases 1 to 317)
AUTHORS Handel,K.A. and Pasick,J.
TITLE Influenza A Virus (A/duck/BritishColumbia/CN26-6/05 (H5N2))
hemagglutinin gene
JOURNAL Unpublished
REFERENCE 2 (bases 1 to 317)
AUTHORS Handel,K.A. and Pasick,J.
TITLE Direct Submission
JOURNAL Submitted (29-NOV-2005) CFIA-NCFAD, 1015 Arlington Street,
Winnipeg, MB R3E 3M4, Canada
FEATURES Location/Qualifiers
source 1..317
/organism="Influenza A virus
(A/duck/BritishColumbia/CN26-6/05(H5N2))"
/mol_type="genomic RNA"
/strain="A/duck/BritishColumbia/CN26-6/05"
/serotype="H5N2"
/host="duck"
/db_xref="taxon:362903"
/segment="4"
/country="Canada"
/note="subtype: H5; pathovar: Low Path"
CDS <1..>317
/codon_start=2
/product="hemagglutinin"
/protein_id="ABC47656.1"
/db_xref="GI:83817210"
/translation="SSMPFHNVHPLTIGECPKYVKSDKLVLATGLRNVPQRETRGLFG
AIAGFIEGGWQGMVDGWYGYHHSNEQGSGYAADKESTQKAIDGITNKVNSIIDKMNTQ
FEA"
ORIGIN
1 ctccagtatg cccttccaca atgttcatcc tcttaccatt ggagagtgcc ccaaatatgt
61 caaatcggac aaactggttc ttgcaacagg actaagaaac gtaccccaaa gagaaacaag
121 aggcctattt ggagcaatag caggatttat agaaggagga tggcaaggaa tggttgatgg
181 gtggtacgga taccaccata gtaatgagca gggaagtgga tatgctgcag acaaagaatc
241 tacccagaaa gcaatagatg ggatcaccaa taaagtgaac tcaatcattg acaaaatgaa
301 cactcaattc gaagcta

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 7:03 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Early tests suggest avian flu outbreak on B.C. farm
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is investigating the possibility of an H5 avian influenza outbreak on a commercial turkey farm in British Columbia's Fraser Valley, the agency confirmed Friday.
Share on Facebook

Reddit this!

Published on Fri Jan 23 2009
ABBOTSFORD, B.C. – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is investigating the possibility of an H5 avian influenza outbreak on a commercial turkey farm in British Columbia's Fraser Valley, the agency confirmed Friday.
Several farms within a three-kilometre radius of the turkey producer in Abbotsford, B.C., have been placed under quarantine, agency spokesperson Monika Mazur said.
Testing done at the B.C. provincial laboratory suggests the presence of H5 viruses, Mazur said. Samples have been sent to CFIA's national lab in Winnipeg for confirmatory testing.
"Depending on the sample quality, the initial results regarding the confirmation of the avian influenza could be expected as early as today," Mazur said from Ottawa on Friday.
The initial testing was done after turkeys on a 50,000 bird farm showed signs of respiratory distress.
If the Winnipeg lab confirms the presence of H5 viruses, additional tests will be needed to identify the virus's neuraminidase subtype – the N in a flu virus's name – and whether the virus is of high or low pathogenicity.
Low path viruses, as they are called, typically only lead to a drop in egg production. But high path viruses are dreaded in poultry operations because they can wipe out whole flocks. And the birds that don't die must be culled to extinguish the outbreak.
In 2004, 17 million birds died or were destroyed in an outbreak caused by a high path H7N3 virus in the Fraser Valley.
Mazur said it would be a couple of days before the full specifics of the virus type would be known.
The presence of H5 virus, if it is confirmed, does not mean there is an outbreak of the H5N1 virus that has killed nearly 250 people in parts of Asia, Africa and Europe. There are multiple subtypes of H5 avian flu. In fact, the Fraser Valley experienced an H5N2 outbreak in November 2005.
Even within H5N1 viruses there are different lineages or families of viruses. The one which has wrecked such havoc in Asia and parts of Africa has so far not been found in North America.
"We have no evidence that it's the Eurasian lineage (virus)," said influenza expert Dr. Danuta Skowronski of the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control.
"And given what's been found previously in North America, it's most likely the North American lineage."
Regardless of the virus type, workers will be taking full precautions if a cull of the birds on the farm is ordered, Skowronski said.
That means wearing protective gear. Workers would also be offered antiviral medication to prevent infection and flu shots to lower the risk that they might get simultaneously infected with human and bird flu viruses. That type of co-infection could give rise to a hybrid virus with the potential to cause a flu pandemic.
"You don't mess around with avian influenza viruses," Skowronski said. "You take all precautions."
A spokesperson for the B.C. Poultry Association said blood samples from the birds at E&H Farms tested positive for avian flu antibodies.
"That doesn't necessarily mean they're diseased with it," Calvin Bruekelman said. "It could be that they just have antibodies in the blood."
Bruekelman said the quarantine was a precaution and no additional action is needed until the confirmatory test results are available.
Mazur said the CFIA would inform the World Organization for Animal Health of the findings. Any outbreak of avian influenza involving H5 or H7 strains must be reported to the Paris-based organization, because those two subtypes can produce high path viruses.
Confirmation of an H5 or an H7 outbreak would likely lead to some countries closing their doors to poultry imports from the affected area.
17:07ET 23-01-09

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2009 ... _farm.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 64 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group