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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:12 pm 
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In today's press conference, the number of confirmed sites with H5N2 increased to 8 (including two entities on the 60,000 turkey farm in Aldergrove,

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:12 pm 
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Map update

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:16 pm 
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 6:40 pm 
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Bird flu continues to expand in southwestern B.C.
Posted Dec. 10th, 2014 by Barb Glen No Comments Share on twitterShare on deliciousShare on facebookShare on emailMore Sharing Services
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Eight poultry farms in British Columbia’s Fraser Valley are now infected with H5N2, a virulent and highly contagious form of avian influenza.

Harpreet Kochhar, chief veterinarian with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, confirmed the total earlier today after two broiler-breeder operations within three kilometres of the first infected barn near Abbotsford were found to be infected.

Kochhar said spread of the virus was not unexpected given its highly infectious nature, and another farm was also under investigation.

In total, 155,000 turkeys and chickens will be destroyed in efforts to control spread. Kochhar said all birds in the first four infected barns had been humanely euthanized and the process was underway at the fifth operation.

The CFIA has established a primary control zone around the affected poultry operations and movement in the region has been restricted.

Kochhar said information on the control zone has been shared with Canada’s trading partners. Eight countries have now imposed restrictions on poultry and/or poultry products from either the Fraser Valley, the province of B.C. or from all of Canada.

It is hoped that word of the control zone will allow other countries to limit their trade restrictions to products from the Fraser Valley region.

Hong Kong, Japan, Mexico, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Taiwan and the United States have all imposed some type of restriction as of today.

Avian influenza poses no threat to food safety or to humans providing birds and meat are properly handled.

The source of the virus in B.C. and its method of spread remain under investigation.

Kochhar said it is unlikely to have been spread by wild birds, based upon ongoing surveillance. There has been no increase in wild bird mortality in the affected region, he said.

Compared to an avian flu outbreak in 2010, in which 16 million birds were destroyed, Kochhar said the current outbreak is minuscule.

However, he cautioned that the extent of this event remains to be seen.

barb.glen@producer.com

http://www.producer.com/daily/bird-flu- ... stern-b-c/

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:16 pm 
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Two More Poultry Farms Quarantined In Canada Bird Flu Outbreak
Singapore Latest to Impose Import Restrictions on Canadian Poultry Products
By PAUL VIEIRA
Dec. 10, 2014 5:31 p.m. ET

Canadian officials said Wednesday that they have quarantined another two poultry farms in British Columbia that have tested positive for avian influenza, bringing the total number of properties affected to eight since the outbreak began a week ago.

The outbreak has seen eight countries impose import restrictions on Canadian poultry products since the Canadian Food Inspection Agency identified the outbreak of the H5 strain of the virus. On Wednesday, Singapore added itself to a list that includes the U.S., South Korea, South Africa, and Japan.

The agency said the two new farms identified were roughly 2 miles away from another infected site. Test results from a new barn located on a farm that has already been quarantined site also tested positive, which the food watchdog is counting as a separate property.

Another farm is also under investigation for suspicion of avian influenza, and more could be identified in the coming days given this strain of the avian flu is highly contagious, officials said.

“We don’t know what stage we are in,” Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, the food agency’s chief veterinary, told journalists.

RELATED

Fifth Farm Quarantined in Canada Bird Flu Outbreak
Canadian Authorities Race to Contain Outbreak
“Our efforts are directed to reduce the disease spread and control any of the influenza from spreading,” Dr. Kochhar said. “In spite of the measures, there is a possibility this could show up in other farms.”

To date, roughly 155,000 birds are affected. A 2004 avian flu outbreak in Canada saw about 16 million birds slaughtered.

Officials reiterated the avian flu virus doesn’t pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked. The virus rarely affects humans who don’t have consistent contact with infected birds.

Write to Paul Vieira at paul.vieira@wsj.com

http://www.wsj.com/articles/two-more-po ... 1418250662

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 7:19 pm 
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Bird flu spreads to two new B.C. farms

By Jane Deacon
Wednesday, December 10, 2014 3:07:36 PST PM
A view of a poultry farm under quarantine due to bird flu, or avian influenza, in Chilliwack.
(REUTERS)
A view of a poultry farm under quarantine due to bird flu, or avian influenza, in Chilliwack. (REUTERS)

Two more Fraser Valley poultry farms have been hit by the avian flu outbreak, bringing the total number of affected birds to 155,000.

Despite efforts to reduce the spread of the disease, health officials say more farms could be affected in the days ahead.

“Since this is highly contagious and can spread rapidly, we might see more at-risk farms come up,” said Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, chief veterinary officer with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Eight countries, including the U.S., have temporarily closed their borders to B.C. and Canadian poultry products since the virus was confirmed last week.

It’s the third outbreak of avian influenza in B.C. in the last decade, with this case relatively small compared to the 16 million B.C. birds affected in 2004.

“Compared to that, the 155,000 birds is very miniscule, however I would at this point mention and do want to underline that we don’t know at what stage of this situation we are,” said Kochhar.

By tomorrow, an estimated 145,000 birds will have been euthanized or died from the virus, with the remaining exterminations expected by the end of the week.

The CFIA continues to hunt for links between the affected turkey and chicken farms — analyzing movement of people, feed and trucks between the sites — and is monitoring the region’s migratory bird population for the potential source of the outbreak.

http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/2014/12/10/bi ... w-bc-farms

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 8:19 pm 
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Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/12101 ... _FV_8.html

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 9:29 pm 
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Avian flu outbreak now spread to 7 B.C. farms: CFIA
Virus has spread to 2 more farms; 155,000 birds either dead or will be euthanized
The Canadian Press Posted: Dec 10, 2014 4:54 PM PT Last Updated: Dec 10, 2014 4:54 PM PT

Image
Workers in bio-security suits are culling more than 150 thousand birds at seven Fraser Valley poultry farms. (CBC)

Avian flu in Fraser Valley unlikely to spread: B.C. Poultry Association
Avian flu detected at 2 Fraser Valley poultry farms
Birds at two more farms in southwestern B.C. have tested positive for avian influenza, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency said Wednesday — underscoring the difficulty facing officials attempting to contain the virus.

The outbreak began last week, when turkeys and chickens at two farms in the Fraser Valley tested positive for the H5N2 strain of the disease.

The virus has now been detected at eight locations on seven farms, leaving 155,000 birds either dead or set to be euthanized.

The outbreak has prompted surveillance and control measures affecting half of the province, as well as a growing list of trade restrictions on B.C. or Canadian poultry.

Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, Canada's chief veterinary officer, said the new infections did not come as a surprise and he suggested more could turn up in the coming days.

Avian flu chicken AP
An H5 influenza outbreak in B.C.'s Fraser Valley has led to the quarantine of five farms and death of thousands of chickens and turkeys. (Associated Press)

Indeed, another farm was also being investigated as suspicious, he said.

"The identification of additional farms is not unexpected, given that avian influenza is highly contagious," Kochhar said during a conference call with reporters.

"Our efforts are directed to controlling the avian influenza virus from spreading. In spite of those measures, there is a
possibility that this could show up at other farms. This is something that is attributed to the highly virulent, highly
pathogenic nature of the avian influenza virus."

Cause of outbreak still unknown

The affected farms are clustered within several kilometres of each other in Abbotsford and Chilliwack.

In each case, the farms were immediately placed under quarantine and plans were made to destroy any birds that had not already been killed by the virus.

Earlier this week, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced a control zone covering the southern half of B.C., where restrictions have been placed on the movement of poultry. Those restrictions are more strict in the area immediately around the affected farms.

It's not yet clear what caused the outbreak, though two farms where the virus was detected had received chickens from a previously infected facility.

Officials are looking into the possibility that migrating wild birds introduced the virus into the region, though Kochhar said
there's nothing conclusive yet, and no evidence the virus had been circulating among wild birds.

Trade restrictions on B.C. poultry expand

Avian influenza poses little danger to people as long as poultry meat is handled and cooked properly.

It can, however, put the poultry industry at risk.

Previous outbreaks in B.C. and elsewhere in Canada similarly led to the destruction of tens of thousands of birds. The most serious, a 2004 outbreak in the Fraser Valley, prompted federal officials to order the slaughter of about 17 million birds.

Since last week, eight countries have placed restrictions on poultry and poultry products. Singapore was added to that list on Wednesday, joining the United States, Mexico, South Africa, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong and South Korea.

Some of those restrictions, such as those put in place by Japan, apply to poultry from all of Canada.

Kochhar said he hoped to convince authorities in other countries to limit any trade restrictions to the region affected by the outbreak.

"We have sent our information to them in terms of our primary control zone, which is southern British Columbia, and have requested them to revisit their restrictions on poultry and poultry products from the rest of Canada," he said.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-c ... -1.2869024

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:10 pm 
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Avian flu detected at two more farms in B.C. as outbreak continues to spread
JAMES KELLER
VANCOUVER — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 10 2014, 8:44 PM EST
Last updated Wednesday, Dec. 10 2014, 8:48 PM EST

Birds at two more farms in southwestern British Columbia have tested positive for avian influenza, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency said Wednesday — underscoring the difficulty facing officials attempting to contain the virus.The outbreak began last week, when turkeys and chickens at two farms in the Fraser Valley tested positive for the H5N2 strain of the disease.

The virus has now been detected at eight locations on seven farms, leaving 155,000 birds either dead or set to be euthanized. The outbreak has prompted surveillance and control measures affecting half of the province, as well as a growing list of trade restrictions on B.C. or Canadian poultry.

Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, Canada’s chief veterinary officer, said the new infections did not come as a surprise and he suggested more could turn up in the coming days. Indeed, another farm was also being investigated as suspicious, he said.

“The identification of additional farms is not unexpected, given that avian influenza is highly contagious,” Kochhar said during a conference call with reporters.

“Our efforts are directed to controlling the avian influenza virus from spreading. In spite of those measures, there is a possibility that this could show up at other farms. This is something that is attributed to the highly virulent, highly pathogenic nature of the avian influenza virus.”

The affected farms are clustered within several kilometres of each other in Abbotsford and Chilliwack.

In each case, the farms were immediately placed under quarantine and plans were made to destroy any birds that had not already been killed by the virus.

Earlier this week, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced a control zone covering the southern half of B.C., where restrictions have been placed on the movement of poultry. Those restrictions are more strict in the area immediately around the affected farms.

It’s not yet clear what caused the outbreak, though two farms where the virus was detected had received chickens from a previously infected facility.

Officials are looking into the possibility that migrating wild birds introduced the virus into the region, though Kochhar said there’s nothing conclusive yet. He said there was no evidence the virus had been circulating among migrating birds and a wild bird monitoring program hadn’t found any unusual increases in animal deaths.

Avian influenza poses little danger to people as long as poultry meat is handled and cooked properly.

It can, however, put the poultry industry at risk.

Previous outbreaks in B.C. and elsewhere in Canada similarly led to the destruction of tens of thousands of birds. The most serious, a 2004 outbreak in the Fraser Valley, prompted federal officials to order the slaughter of about 17 million birds.

Since last week, eight countries have placed restrictions on poultry and poultry products. Singapore was added to that list on Wednesday, joining the United States, Mexico, South Africa, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong and South Korea.

Some of those restrictions, such as those put in place by Japan, apply to poultry from all of Canada.

Kochhar said he hoped to convince authorities in other countries to limit any trade restrictions to the region affected by the outbreak.

“We have sent our information to them in terms of our primary control zone, which is southern British Columbia, and have requested them to revisit their restrictions on poultry and poultry products from the rest of Canada,” he said.

Consumers are unlikely to notice the outbreak at the grocery store.

The marketing group the B.C. Turkey Farmers has said about 25,000 turkeys meant for the provincial Christmas market have been lost — a relatively small proportion of the 3.3 million kilograms of turkey typically produced for the holiday season.

Likewise, the number of chickens destroyed due to the outbreak pales in comparison with the 160 million kilograms of chicken produced in B.C. each year.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/bri ... e22035682/

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 12:12 am 
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NEWS
Avian influenza discovered on two new Abbotsford farms
Image
Canadian Food Inspection Agency workers are on scene at an Abbotsford turkey farm quarantined after the discovery of avian flu.— Image Credit: Tyler Olsen

by Tyler Olsen - Abbotsford News
posted Dec 10, 2014 at 1:00 PM— updated Dec 10, 2014 at 4:05 PM
Avian influenza has been detected at two Abbotsford poultry farms, officials said Wednesday.

The two farms have a total of just under 9,000 broiler breeder chickens. Both are within three kilometres of a Sumas Prairie turkey farm where the "highly contagious and virulent" virus first began killing birds over the weekend of Nov. 29 and 30.

The virus was also found on a second barn at a site where influenza was discovered late last week. The two barns, which both have in excess of 30,000 birds, are owned by different companies and being treated as different farms. A total of 155,000 birds at eight different poultry operations have now either already died or been euthanized, or will be killed as officials try to stop the H5N2 avian influenza from spreading further.

And one more Fraser Valley farm is also under investigation, according to Dr. Harpreet Kochar, chief veterinary officer of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA).

Kochar said the discovery of new affected sites was not a shock.

"This identification of additional farms is not unexpected given that avian influenza is highly contagious," he told reporters at a press briefing Wednesday. "The fact that these farms were identified quickly underscores industry's commitment to supporting the response effort by immediately reporting any signs of illness."

The CFIA has finished "depopulating" the first four farms of birds, and efforts are now underway at the fifth farm. Birds at the newly affected farms will also be killed in the days to come.

In an effort to control the spread of the virus, movement restrictions have been put in place on all poultry in Southern British Columbia, with areas surrounding the farms affected under increased scrutiny and restrictions.

But Kochar said there was no guarantee that the restrictions would stop the further spread of the virus.

"In spite of the measures, there is a possibility that this could show up in other farms and this is something that is attributed to the highly virulent and highly pathogenic of the avian influenza virus," he said.

Officials still have not identified the source of the disease, he said.

Meanwhile, Singapore has also announced a ban on Canadian poultry products, bringing to the list of countries with trade restrictions on poultry to eight, including the United States and Mexico.

http://www.abbynews.com/news/285413931.html

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