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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:51 pm 
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H5 reported on two farms in British Columbia

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 5:53 pm 
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Avian flu detected at 2 Fraser Valley poultry farms
Virus detected at Abbotsford turkey farm and Chilliwack broiler chicken breeding farm
CBC News Posted: Dec 02, 2014 12:36 PM PT Last Updated: Dec 02, 2014 1:43 PM PT

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The H5 avian influenza virus has been detected on two B.C. poultry farms east of Vancouver.

The H5 avian influenza virus has been detected on two poultry farms in the Fraser Valley east of Vancouver, officials in B.C. have confirmed

Testing found the virus at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler chicken breeding facility in Chilliwack, officials said in a statement released just after noon on Tuesday.

"The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has placed the two farms under quarantine to control disease spread and the industry sector has been notified to adopt enhanced biosecurity practices," said the statement.

Testing was conducted on Monday after large numbers of birds died at the farms over the weekend.

Officials say the two farms are about eight kilometres apart and they have yet to establish any links between the two, such as workers or vehicles.

18,000 bird affected

Officials say the virus has caused heavy mortality among the infected birds. About half of the 11,000 birds on one farm and half of the 7,000 birds on the other farm have already died from the disease.

The rest will be killed by gassing the barn with carbon monoxide.

The carcasses will then be composted in the barn to contain the disease before they are removed and the farms will remain under quarantine until the barns, equipment and vehicles are disinfected.

Further testing is underway to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus, CFIA said, and the results are expected within days.

But officials note the virus has not been detected in humans in the area and rarely affects humans who do not have direct contact with infected birds.

Furthermore, it does not pose a risk to food products that are properly cooked.

4th outbreak since 2005

The turkeys were 83 days old and would likely have been slaughtered for Christmas, said officials.

The outbreak is the fourth in the Fraser Valley since 2004.

In 2009, an outbreak of avian flu in the same region led to the quarantine of several farms

In another Fraser Valley outbreak in November 2005, two duck farms were infected with the H5N2 strain of the virus.

In 2004, an H7-type flu transformed into a highly contagious strain. Farm after farm was quarantined until finally about 15 million birds — almost the entire valley poultry population — were destroyed.

http://stellapollard.sharedby.co/TbEW2b

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:00 pm 
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Victoria, December 2, 2014

Preliminary testing by the Province of British Columbia has confirmed the presence of H5 avian influenza on two farms in the Fraser Valley; a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler breeder farm in Chilliwack.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has placed the two farms under quarantine to control disease spread and the industry sector has been notified to adopt enhanced biosecurity practices. Further testing by the CFIA is underway to confirm pathogenicity and to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus. Pathogenicity refers to the severity of the illness caused in birds. Results are expected within days.

http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=911019

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:00 pm 
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niman wrote:
Victoria, December 2, 2014

Preliminary testing by the Province of British Columbia has confirmed the presence of H5 avian influenza on two farms in the Fraser Valley; a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler breeder farm in Chilliwack.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has placed the two farms under quarantine to control disease spread and the industry sector has been notified to adopt enhanced biosecurity practices. Further testing by the CFIA is underway to confirm pathogenicity and to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus. Pathogenicity refers to the severity of the illness caused in birds. Results are expected within days.

http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=911019

Avian influenza confirmed on two farms in Fraser Valley
Victoria, December 2, 2014

Preliminary testing by the Province of British Columbia has confirmed the presence of H5 avian influenza on two farms in the Fraser Valley; a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler breeder farm in Chilliwack.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has placed the two farms under quarantine to control disease spread and the industry sector has been notified to adopt enhanced biosecurity practices. Further testing by the CFIA is underway to confirm pathogenicity and to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus. Pathogenicity refers to the severity of the illness caused in birds. Results are expected within days.

Avian influenza viruses do not pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked. Avian influenza rarely affects humans that do not have consistent contact with infected birds. Public health authorities stand ready to take precautionary measures as warranted.

Initial tests for the disease were conducted on December 1 at a British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture laboratory in Abbotsford, after both operations experienced sudden deaths of birds over the weekend.

All birds on the infected premises will be humanely euthanized and disposed of, in accordance with provincial environmental regulations and internationally accepted disease control guidelines. As lead response agency the CFIA will ensure the quarantine of the infected farms, and determine a surrounding surveillance zone for further testing. The CFIA will also lead on required depopulation of birds, while the Province will provide technical support on required carcass disposal. Once all birds have been removed, the CFIA will oversee the cleaning and disinfection of the barns, vehicles, equipment and tools to eliminate any infectious material that may remain.

The Province of British Columbia, the CFIA, the owners of the infected birds, and the poultry industry are working closely together to manage the situation. Both levels of government will work with the poultry industry to address issues as they emerge. The Canadian poultry sector currently practices a high level of biosecurity that reduces the risk of disease spread.

Contact:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Media Relations
613-773-6600

Dave Townsend
British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture
250-356-7098
250-889-5945 (cell)

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:09 pm 
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December 2, 2014 4:20 pm
Two Fraser Valley farms quarantined after presence of H5 avian influenza confirmed
By Yuliya Talmazan and Paula Baker Global News
A turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler breeder farm in Chilliwack have been placed under quarantine after the presence of H5 avian influenza was confirmed through preliminary testing.

Initial tests were conducted on Monday at a laboratory in Abbotsford after both farms experienced sudden deaths of birds over the weekend. Further testing is currently underway to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus, and results are expected within days.


According to Dr. Jane Pritchard, chief veterinary officer with the BC Ministry of Agriculture, 18,000 birds will be humanely euthanized and composted at the barns. The Abbotsford farm had 11,000 birds but half had died of the disease and the Chilliwack farm had 1,000 of their 7,000 birds perish.

The names of the two affected businesses have not been disclosed but Canadian Food Inspection Agency officials did say the two farms had no direct connection and are approximately 8 km away from each other.

Pritchard says the turkeys would have been targetted for the upcoming Christmas market.

The agency says there will be an investigation into how the virus spread between barns — whether it was due to migratory patterns or personnel moving between the two affected areas.

The CFIA says the quarantine measure was taken to control disease spread and the industry sector has been notified to adopt enhanced bio-security practices.

The agency reassures avian influenza viruses do not pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked.

The World Health Organization says humans can become ill when infected with viruses from animal sources, including avian influenza virus subtypes H5N1 and H9N2.

The primary risk factor for human infection appears to be direct or indirect exposure to infected live or dead animals or contaminated environments.

In January of this year, the first case of H5N1 bird flu in North America left an Alberta resident dead. The patient travelled to China in December 2013 and was admitted to hospital in Alberta on New Year’s Day. By Jan. 3, the patient died. It was the first case of H5N1 Canada has ever seen since the deadly influenza first surfaced over a decade ago.

http://globalnews.ca/news/1704374/two-f ... ba7b9c8a63

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:37 pm 
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H5N8 map update

https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit? ... 2tn8&hl=en

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:40 pm 
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Bird flu found at 2 poultry farms in Canada
Posted by BNO News on December 2, 2014 in World | 0 Comment



VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA (BNO NEWS) — A bird flu virus of subtype H5 has been found at two poultry farms in British Columbia, the Canadian government confirmed on Tuesday, but further testing is needed to determine whether it involves the H5N8 strain that has been found in Europe and Asia.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said initial tests were carried out on Monday after the sudden deaths of birds over the weekend at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler breeder farm in Chilliwack, which are about 8 kilometers (4.9 miles) apart. Test results came back on Tuesday that confirmed the birds had died of a bird flu virus of subtype H5.

“Further testing by the CFIA is underway to confirm pathogenicity and to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus,” the agency said in a news release, adding that results are expected later this week.

There are some 18,000 birds at the two affected farms, but about half of the birds at both farms has already died of the virus, indicating it involves a highly pathogenic virus. The birds which are still alive will be culled and destroyed before CFIA starts the cleaning and disinfection of the barns, vehicles, equipment and tools to eliminate any infectious material.

“The Province of British Columbia, the CFIA, the owners of the infected birds, and the poultry industry are working closely together to manage the situation,” CFIA said. “Both levels of government will work with the poultry industry to address issues as they emerge. The Canadian poultry sector currently practices a high level of biosecurity that reduces the risk of disease spread.”

The bird flu outbreak in Canada follows a series of outbreaks in Europe in recent weeks, which the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) said was likely caused by wild birds from Asia. The outbreaks in Asia and Europe involved the highly pathogenic H5N8 bird flu strain, but it is not yet known whether the outbreak in Canada involves the same subtype.

The bird flu outbreaks in Europe began in early November when a turkey tested positive for H5N8 at a farm in northeastern Germany, after which all susceptible birds present at the farm were destroyed. A second outbreak was found at a poultry farm in the Netherlands on November 15, followed by outbreaks at five additional farms in recent weeks.

A case of H5N8 bird flu was also found at a duck breeding farm in northern England last month, as well as in two Eurasian wigeons in the Netherlands and in a Eurasian teal in northern Germany. South Korea experienced about 30 H5N8 outbreaks earlier this year, while Japan and China reported finding the virus in wild birds.

Wild birds are known to be able to carry bird flu viruses without getting sick and their migratory flyways sometimes result in outbreaks along their path. But the virus can also spread from farm to farm on the shoes or clothing of workers, by the movement of domestic live birds, and through contaminated vehicles, equipment, food, and cages.

http://www.bnowire.com/2014/12/02/urgen ... in-canada/

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:46 pm 
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UPDATE 1-Bird flu kills thousands of birds on two Canadian farms
Tue, Dec 02 17:08 PM EST
(Adds details on bird deaths, comments from conference call)

By Rod Nickel

Dec 2 (Reuters) - Avian influenza, known as bird flu, has killed thousands of turkeys and chickens on two farms in the province of British Columbia, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said on Tuesday.

The government agency said it has placed the farms under quarantine as it conducts tests over the coming days to determine the virus's precise subtype, and its pathogenicity, or severity.

It has so far identified the virus type as H5, which has previously been reported in Canada, said Harpreet Kochhar, the CFIA's chief veterinary officer

Avian flu is an infectious viral disease of birds. Most bird flu viruses do not infect humans, but some have caused serious infections in humans, according to the World Health Organization.

Germany, the Netherlands and Britain reported cases last month of the highly pathogenic bird flu H5N8, which is similar to one that devastated poultry flocks in South Korea earlier this year, but has never been detected in humans.

About half of 11,000 turkeys at a farm at Abbotsford, British Columbia, have already died from the disease, while 1,000 of 7,000 broiler chickens at a second farm near Chilliwack, British Columbia, have died, said Jane Pritchard, the West Coast province's chief veterinary officer. All of the remaining birds on the farms, which are eight kilometres (five miles) apart, will be killed.

Kochhar said it is unclear how the virus infected the farms. He said he has notified U.S. authorities about the discovery.

In 2014, Canada exported 145,000 tonnes of broiler meat and 25,000 tonnes of turkey meat, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. (Reporting by Rod Nickel in Winnipeg, Manitoba; Editing by Chris Reese; and Peter Galloway)

http://mobile.reuters.com/article/idUSL ... 2?irpc=932

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:51 pm 
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Thousands of Birds Dead Following Avian Flu Outbreak in B.C.

Image

Jesse Tahirali, CTVNews.ca
Published Tuesday, December 2, 2014 4:11PM EST
Last Updated Tuesday, December 2, 2014 5:32PM EST

Two poultry farms in British Columbia have been placed under quarantine after the Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed Tuesday an avian flu outbreak.

At a turkey farm in Abbotsford, B.C., half of the barn’s 11,000 birds have already died from the disease, according to Jane Pritchard, B.C.’s chief veterinary officer. At a second farm about eight kilometres away in Chilliwack, B.C., 1,000 of the farm’s 7,000 birds have died.

Pritchard told reporters Tuesday the remaining birds would be euthanized using carbon dioxide gas, then “composted” in the barn so the disease would not escape the building or go airborne. The CFIA will also oversee the disinfection of the barns, vehicles and tools once the infected animals are disposed of.

Canada’s Chief Veterinary Officer Harpreet Kochhar told reporters the virus strain was H5, but that it was too early to determine the subtype of the virus.

The H5N1 virus killed a Canadian in January who had recently travelled to China.

There are currently no new cases of human infection in Canada, and Kochhar said that human-to-human transmission of the virus is rare. He added that even the meat of an infected bird doesn’t pose a health threat if prepared properly.

Kochhar said more information would become available within days as further tests are carried out, and that “enhanced biosecurity practices” would be put in place.

Kochhar also said it was protocol to inform the country’s trading partners in these sorts of situations.

“I have reached out to the chief veterinary officer, my counterpart out there, in the U.S.,” he said. “We have shared whatever information we have at this point.”
Pritchard said the connection between the two barns had yet to be established, and it was unclear how two farms in different cities saw simultaneous outbreaks.

Though Pritchard declined to name the farms in question, she did say grocery stores might take a hit during the holiday season.

“The turkeys were 83 days of age, so they would have been targeted for the Christmas market.”

http://www.ctvnews.ca/health/thousands- ... -1.2129571


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 6:54 pm 
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Federal officials have quarantined a turkey farm and a broiler breeder farm in British Columbia’s Fraser Valley after both were confirmed with outbreaks of an H5 strain of avian influenza.

The quarantines, announced Tuesday, follow death losses of “over half” of the 11,000 birds at the turkey farm near Abbotsford, and of about 1,000 of the 7,000 birds on the broiler operation near Chilliwack.

That said, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency is now running further tests to confirm the pathogenicity of the virus in question — that is, whether the virus is “high-path” or “low-path” in terms of the severity of illness it causes in birds.

The tests, which are to be completed “within days,” are also expected to confirm the subtype and strain of the virus.

A turkey farm near Abbotsford was the site of an outbreak of “low-path” H5N2 avian flu in 2009; farms in the Fraser Valley previously endured a costly avian flu outbreak in 2004. Canada has been considered free of “high-path” avian flu since an outbreak of H7N3 in birds at a southern Saskatchewan poultry farm in 2008.

While officials plan to look for any possible connection between the two farms, sited several kilometres apart on opposite sides of the Vedder River, none has yet been found, B.C.’s chief veterinary officer Dr. Jane Pritchard said on a conference call Tuesday afternoon.

Surviving birds at both operations will be humanely euthanized, after which all of both farms’ birds will be composted and removed, officials said. Both farms’ barns, vehicles, equipment and tools are then to be cleaned and disinfected.

Initial tests for avian flu were run Monday at the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture’s lab at Abbotsford, after both operations “experienced sudden deaths of birds over the weekend,” CFIA said Tuesday in a release.

The turkeys on the Abbotsford farm were 83 days old, and thus “would have been targeted for the Christmas (dinner) market,” Pritchard said.

“Precautionary measures”

CFIA, now the lead response agency in this case, said it will “ensure the quarantine of the infected farms, and determine a surrounding surveillance zone for further testing.”

The province, CFIA, the farms’ owners and industry groups are “working closely together to manage the situation,” CFIA said, and both levels of government “will work with the poultry industry to address issues as they emerge.”

Canada’s poultry sector “currently practices a high level of biosecurity that reduces the risk of disease spread,” CFIA said.

Avian flu viruses do not pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked, CFIA emphasized in its release Tuesday. Avian flu “rarely” affects humans who do not have consistent contact with infected birds, the agency noted.

Federal public health officials in January reported an Alberta woman died of H5N1 after she returned from a visit to Beijing, marking the first and only human case of the virus to date in this country. Public health authorities “stand ready to take precautionary measures as warranted,” CFIA said Tuesday.

In areas of high pressure for avian flu, human health experts have long expressed concern that a strain such as H5N1 may mutate or combine with a human flu virus that could spread more easily among people.

CFIA’s chief veterinary officer Dr. Harpreet Kochhar said on Tuesday’s call that the agency has shared the information it has on this week’s outbreak so far with federal veterinary officials in the U.S. – AGCanada.com Network

http://www.agcanada.com/daily/two-frase ... -avian-flu

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