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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 9:22 am 
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Science will hold a live chat on H7N2 Thursday at 10 AM EDT

http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2 ... html?rss=1

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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 9:23 am 
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Live Chat: The Threat of H7N9 Bird Flu

by Jon Cohen on 1 May 2013, 8:47 AM | 0 Comments


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See below for the chat box. Join us this Thursday at 10 a.m. EDT for a live conversation with leading scientists and expert reporters.


Today's Topic

When Chinese public health officials announced last month that people were sick and dying from a bird flu virus never before seen in humans, researchers immediately began hunting for answers to a deluge of pressing questions. How did the humans become infected? How deadly was the bug? Had it spread to people outside of China? Would anti-influenza drugs work? And how long would it take to make a vaccine?

Join us at a special time, 10 a.m. EDT, on Thursday, 2 May, on this page for a live chat when we discuss H7N9 with experts. They’ll tackle the questions above and take yours. Be sure to leave your queries in the comment box below.

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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 10:01 am 
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alternatively they could make a forum

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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 11:15 am 
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I did submit a few questions and they took the one on gain of function (the changes seen in H5N1 transmission studies).

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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 11:18 am 
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niman wrote:
I did submit a few questions and they took the one on gain of function (the changes seen in H5N1 transmission studies).

Here is the submitted question:

Speaking of gain of function studies, there were three changes in common with all three labs (Donis at CDC, Fouchier at EMC, Kawaoka at Wisconsin) doing H5N1 transmission studies (a PB2 change like E627K, a loss of glycosylation site at H7 position 158, and receptor binding change Q226L. H7N9 in humans already has all three changes. Comments?

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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 11:32 am 
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niman wrote:
niman wrote:
I did submit a few questions and they took the one on gain of function (the changes seen in H5N1 transmission studies).

Here is the submitted question:

Speaking of gain of function studies, there were three changes in common with all three labs (Donis at CDC, Fouchier at EMC, Kawaoka at Wisconsin) doing H5N1 transmission studies (a PB2 change like E627K, a loss of glycosylation site at H7 position 158, and receptor binding change Q226L. H7N9 in humans already has all three changes. Comments?

I thought the response was weak (or non-responsive). The basic response was that what happens in H5N1 doesn't have to happen in H7N9 and H1N1pdm09 was used as an example of an alternative substitute for E627K. However, all of the human cases actually do have a PB2 change that is known to adapt avian PB2 to mammalian (6 have E627K and 1 has D701N, and none of the avian sequences have either), so the strong segregation in human H7N9 cases of a change that is absent in humans shows that the E627K seen in H5N1 was acting in H7N9. Similarly, the number of human H7N9 cases also show that it is more efficient at infecting than H5N1. Moreover, H7N9 has these precise H7 changes (abolition of glycosylation site as well as Q226L). Moreover two human cases have already gone beyond the H5N1 studies by changing Q226L to L226I.

It is also worth noting that the chat has been archive, so the audio and video are available at the link beginning this thread,

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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 11:47 am 
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niman wrote:
niman wrote:
niman wrote:
I did submit a few questions and they took the one on gain of function (the changes seen in H5N1 transmission studies).

Here is the submitted question:

Speaking of gain of function studies, there were three changes in common with all three labs (Donis at CDC, Fouchier at EMC, Kawaoka at Wisconsin) doing H5N1 transmission studies (a PB2 change like E627K, a loss of glycosylation site at H7 position 158, and receptor binding change Q226L. H7N9 in humans already has all three changes. Comments?

I thought the response was weak (or non-responsive). The basic response was that what happens in H5N1 doesn't have to happen in H7N9 and H1N1pdm09 was used as an example of an alternative substitute for E627K. However, all of the human cases actually do have a PB2 change that is known to adapt avian PB2 to mammalian (6 have E627K and 1 has D701N, and none of the avian sequences have either), so the strong segregation in human H7N9 cases of a change that is absent in humans shows that the E627K seen in H5N1 was acting in H7N9. Similarly, the number of human H7N9 cases also show that it is more efficient at infecting than H5N1. Moreover, H7N9 has these precise H7 changes (abolition of glycosylation site as well as Q226L). Moreover two human cases have already gone beyond the H5N1 studies by changing Q226L to L226I.

It is also worth noting that the chat has been archive, so the audio and video are available at the link beginning this thread,

The chat session was 44 minutes and 18 seconds. The above question was asked at the 28:25 mark and the answer began at the 29:09 mark, which ended with "lets keep our fingers crossed" at 30:31.

http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2 ... html?rss=1

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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 12:37 pm 
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and if they succeed to make a real good (-->bad) virus,
would/should they tell us ?

no news is bad news

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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 12:43 pm 
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gsgs wrote:
and if they succeed to make a real good (-->bad) virus,
would/should they tell us ?

no news is bad news

Who is they?

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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 12:48 pm 
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Erasmus,Wisconsin,

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