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PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 6:56 pm 
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Two U.S. Children Contract New Strain of Swine Flu
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By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) — Experts at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are investigating two recent cases of swine flu in which the new strain of flu passed directly from pigs to children.

This strain of flu does not appear capable of human-to-human transmission, but further study is needed, because if it were to spread among humans, the implications would be severe, the agency said. The CDC says the new strain contains genetic material from the H1N1 virus that swept the world last year, plus DNA from other pig flu viruses.


“We hope to learn more about the extent of transmission as soon as possible,” said CDC spokesman Tom Skinner. “We see a couple of cases of swine origin influenza every year, and usually it’s in people who have direct contact with swine. Right now there doesn’t appear to be any sustained human-to-human transmission.”

Both cases, revealed Sept. 2 in an early release of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, involved children under 5 years old, one in Indiana and the other in Pennsylvania.

The Indiana boy who came down with the flu had no contact with pigs, but a caregiver had been in direct contact with swine in the weeks before the boy became sick. In the other case, a girl developed flu after having contact with pigs at a fair, according to the report.

Both children recovered, and no other family members got sick, the CDC said.

According to Skinner, these are the first cases of new swine flu seen this year.

“As far as the general population is concerned, here we have a situation where we have a couple of cases in people who have had contact with swine,” Skinner said. “The general public, I don’t think, should be concerned about these cases.”

However, people who have contact with swine and develop an upper-respiratory illness accompanied by fever need to make sure their doctor knows that they had contact with swine, Skinner said.

“This report shows our system of being able to detect new and emerging influenza viruses is working,” he said.

Skinner added that the flu viruses known to go from person-to-person are those seen during the flu season, which usually starts in December.

This year’s seasonal flu vaccine contains the same strains as last year’s, which are the ones seen now in the Southern Hemisphere, he said. Skinner urged people to get a flu shot before the flu season begins in North America this winter.

Flu expert Dr. Marc Siegel, an associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York City, said “there is no concern for the public at this point.”

“You have to remember that swine flu strains and bird flu strains are coming out all the time, and two cases doesn’t mean anything,” Siegel said.

Pigs are mixing vessels for flu, Siegel explained. “We see this every year. The key here is that we don’t see any tendency toward sustained human spread,” he said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about flu.

SOURCES: Tom Skinner, spokesman, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Marc Siegel, M.D., associate professor, medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York City, author of The Inner Pulse: Unlocking the Secret Code For Sickness and Health; Sept. 2, 2011, CDC, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Last Updated: Sept. 02, 2011

http://news.health.com/2011/09/02/two-u ... swine-flu/

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 6:57 pm 
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niman wrote:
Flu expert Dr. Marc Siegel, an associate professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York City, said “there is no concern for the public at this point.”

“You have to remember that swine flu strains and bird flu strains are coming out all the time, and two cases doesn’t mean anything,” Siegel said.

Pigs are mixing vessels for flu, Siegel explained. “We see this every year. The key here is that we don’t see any tendency toward sustained human spread,” he said.

http://news.health.com/2011/09/02/two-u ... swine-flu/

Expert at spouting utter nonsense.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 8:14 pm 
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trH3N2 will be discussed Monday at 11 PM EST on Rense.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 10:00 pm 
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dont panic !!

the law of averages says that Niman should get one right soon.

time to panic


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 03, 2011 10:01 pm 
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cpg wrote:
dont panic !!

the law of averages says that Niman should get one right soon.

time to panic

You remain a clueless clown

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:44 am 
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niman wrote:
Clinicians should consider swine-origin influenza A virus infection as well as seasonal influenza virus infections in the differential diagnosis of patients with febrile respiratory illness who have been near pigs. Clinicians who suspect influenza virus infection in humans with recent exposure to swine, should obtain a nasopharyngeal swab from the patient, place the swab in a viral transport medium, contact their state or local health department to facilitate transport and timely diagnosis at a state public health laboratory, and consider empiric neuraminidase inhibitor antiviral treatment (4). CDC requests that state public health laboratories send all suspected swine-origin influenza A specimens to the CDC, Influenza Division, Virus Surveillance and Diagnostics Branch Laboratory.


Note that the CDC is only requesting samples from symtomatic patients with swine exposure, ensuring that those positive for trH3N2 will have a swine link.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 4:51 pm 
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Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/09041 ... sting.html

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:18 pm 
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INDIANAPOLIS — A new strain of swine flu has shown up in two young children in Pennsylvania and Indiana who had direct or indirect contact with pigs.

There’s no sign the virus has spread beyond the two cases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday.
“We wanted to provide some information without being alarmist,” because people have contact with pigs at fairs this time of year, and doctors should watch for possible flu cases, said Lyn Finelli, the CDC’s flu surveillance chief. “We’re always concerned when we see transmission of animal viruses to humans.”
People rarely get flu from pigs — only 21 cases have been documented in the past five years — and it’s too soon to know how infectious this virus will be, Finelli said.
This particular virus has only been seen eight times in the past five years. The Indiana case was the ninth and the Pennsylvania case the 10th, according to the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report issued Friday.
In Indiana, the virus was picked up as part of routine flu surveillance, said Shawn Richards, respiratory epidemiologist for the state Department of Health.
A boy younger than 5, who had chronic health problems, went to the hospital with flu symptoms on July 23. Richards declined to say where the case occurred.
When the boy’s flu test came back positive, the state’s virology lab requested the specimen because it’s unusual to see the disease at this time of year, Richards said. The lab found the flu strain to be nonhuman and sent it to the CDC.
The boy had had no contact with pigs, but a caretaker did in the weeks before he fell ill. She was asymptomatic, Richards said. No other family members appear ill.
In the Pennsylvania case, a girl, also younger than 5, had contact with pigs at an agricultural fair last month. She, too, has recovered, and health officials are investigating reports of illness in other people who went to the fair. No additional cases have been confirmed.
The viruses in the two children were similar but not identical, and Richards said there was no indication of a connection between the two cases.
Despite the rarity of such cases, there’s no reason for alarm, health officials say.
“What it has told us is that our surveillance systems are working very well,” Richard said.
Studies showed that the virus includes a gene from the 2009 pandemic strain that might let it spread more easily than pig viruses normally do.
The new strain is a hybrid of viruses that have infected pigs over the past decade and a gene from the H1N1 strain that caused the pandemic two years ago. It is the first combination virus to turn up in people since the pandemic, said Michael Shaw, a CDC lab chief. It’s classified as an H3N2 virus.

http://www.courier-journal.com/article/ ... 25/rsslink

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:21 pm 
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niman wrote:
INDIANAPOLIS — .
The new strain is a hybrid of viruses that have infected pigs over the past decade and a gene from the H1N1 strain that caused the pandemic two years ago. It is the first combination virus to turn up in people since the pandemic, said Michael Shaw, a CDC lab chief. It’s classified as an H3N2 virus.

http://www.courier-journal.com/article/ ... 25/rsslink

Reality check. There are two examples of isolates with 7 trH3N2 gene segments and 1 pandemic H1N1 segment, and both examples are human isolates identified in August, 2011.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 11:06 pm 
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.
.Home News Local Courier Times Courier Times .New swine flu cases isolated
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Susan Walsh

health care
Lobbyist Paul Miller is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, March 20, 2009. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

.Protect yourself against the flu
As the investigation into a recent case of never-before-seen swine flu in a young child continues, the Pennsylvania Department of Health reminds residents to take preventative actions, including:

■Covering the nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing or sneezing into your sleeve or elbow if you do not have a tissue;
■Washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after you cough or sneeze, or using an alcohol-based hand cleaner; and
■Staying home from work, school and social gatherings if you have flu-like and feverish symptoms to help prevent others from catching your illness.
■If you or your children become ill with symptoms of influenza, the Pennsylvania Department of Health recommends you contact your health care provider.
For more information about influenza, visit www.health.state.pa.us or www.flufreepa.com.



. Posted: Sunday, September 4, 2011 6:00 am | Updated: 6:16 am, Sun Sep 4, 2011.

New swine flu cases isolated
By Jo Ciavaglia
Staff writer Calkins Media, Inc. | 8 comments

Federal and state health officials say a new swine flu strain recently sickened two preschool age children in Pennsylvania and Indiana, but they cautioned the cases appear to be isolated.

The new virus contains a gene from the H1N1 swine flu, which caused a global pandemic two years ago, and parts of other previous, rare swine flu viruses called H3N2, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which included the two cases in a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, issued online Friday.

Both the infected children, ages 2 and 5, had direct or indirect contact with pigs prior to becoming sick, according to the CDC. Both children have recovered and each received a seasonal flu shot last year that contained protection against H1N1.

No additional cases have been confirmed as of Friday.

Scientists found no specific link between the two cases and there is no immediate evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission, the CDC said.

“At this time, with only one case of this kind identified in Pennsylvania, we cannot yet say there is a significant risk to public health,” said Pennsylvania Department of Health Secretary Dr. Eli Avila. “However, it is something that we are taking very seriously and actively investigating.”

The Pennsylvania Department of Health on Friday issued an advisory urging the public take precautions to prevent the spread of respiratory viruses in light of its investigation into the new swine flu strain.

The agency is urging public health professionals to watch for patients with flu-like symptoms and forward lab samples to the state if a patient tests positive for Type-A virus.

State health officials are conducting exposure investigations in Schuylkill and Washington counties among people who attended an agricultural fair.

The most recent case reported appeared in a 2-year-old Schuylkill County girl who attended the fair and had contact with pigs. She became sick on Aug. 20 with a high fever, dry cough and lethargy. She tested positive for Type-A flu at a local hospital emergency room, but was not admitted.

The samples were sent to the state health labs and CDC for further testing, which confirmed the unique strain, which resembles a strain found in an Indiana boy in July. The boy, who has chronic health conditions, reportedly did not have direct exposure to pigs, but one of his caretakers did before the boy became ill.

Bucks County Health Department Director Dr. David Damsker says the discovery of a new flu strain is not unusual, particularly given the CDC’s new national surveillance effort designed to identify new flu strains and track flu virus trends.

“We’re starting to see more strains that may not have been noticed 20 years ago because we’re looking so closely today,” Damsker said.

Influenza viruses are commonly found in humans, swine, birds and other animals and there are more than 50 strains of human flu virus alone. Seasonal flu season typically runs December through March.

Each winter, scientists try to predict which flu strains will circulate so they can develop an effective vaccine for the following season.

Three strains are picked, two from the Type A family of influenza and one from Type B, but there is no way to predict with 100-percent accuracy which flu strains will be more active each year.

Every year public health officials typically see a few flu strains the seasonal vaccine does not protect against, Damsker said, adding that, based on the two confirmed cases, the new swine strain does not appear any more dangerous than regular flu.

“At this point, we don’t think it’s anything to be concerned about,” he added.

http://www.phillyburbs.com/news/local/c ... a9a2d.html

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