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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2015 9:13 pm 
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Fujian H5N2 Sioux County Iowa 1.7 Million Chickens

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2015 9:14 pm 
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OUR PROBABLE CASES OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA IN OSCEOLA, O’BRIEN AND SIOUX COUNTIES

Media Advisory:
The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship and USDA will host a press conference call at 3:15 p.m. on Monday, April 27, 2015 to discuss the additional avian influenza cases in Iowa.

Call in number: 866-685-1580
Conference code: 5152818615

FOUR PROBABLE CASES OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA IN OSCEOLA, O’BRIEN AND SIOUX COUNTIES
CDC considers the risk to people to be low

DES MOINES – The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship is responding to four probable cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in commercial poultry farms in Osceola, O’Brien and Sioux Counties in Northwest Iowa. These four new cases would join three confirmed cases of the disease in Iowa. State officials have quarantined the premises and if the initial test are confirmed, all birds on the property will be humanely euthanized to prevent the spread of the disease.

Osceola County 2 – Pullet farm with an estimated 250,000 birds. Initial testing showed it positive for H5 avian influenza. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames.

O’Brien County 1 – Commercial laying operation with an estimated 240,000 birds that has experienced increased mortality. Initial testing showed it positive for H5 avian influenza. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames.

O’Brien County 2 – Commercial laying operation with an estimated 98,000 birds that has experienced increased mortality. Initial testing showed it positive for H5 avian influenza. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames.

Sioux County – Commercial laying operation with an estimated 1.7 million birds that has experienced increased mortality. Initial testing showed it positive for H5 avian influenza. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Iowa Department of Public Health considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with the virus have ever been detected there is no food safety risk for consumers.

The United States has the strongest Avian Influenza (AI) surveillance program in the world. As part of the existing USDA avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners as well as industry are responding quickly and decisively to these outbreaks by following these five basic steps: 1) Quarantine – restricting movement of poultry and poultry-moving equipment into and out of the control area; 2) Eradicate – humanely euthanizing the affected flock(s); 3) Monitor region – testing wild and domestic birds in a broad area around the quarantine area; 4) Disinfect – kills the virus in the affected flock locations; and 5) Test – confirm that poultry farms in the area are free of the virus.

The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship in partnership with the Iowa Department of Public Health are working directly with poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure proper precautions are being taken.

These virus strains can travel in wild birds without those birds appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard flock owners, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to state/federal officials, either through their state veterinarian at 515-281-5321 or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593.

Information will also be posted to the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at http://www.iowaagriculture.gov/avianinfluenza.asp.

http://www.iowaagriculture.gov/press/20 ... 272015.asp

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2015 9:17 pm 
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Map update

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2015 11:21 pm 
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Update on Avian Influenza Findings
Poultry Findings Confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories

State County Flyway Flock type Species Avian influenza subtype* Confirmation date Flock size
IA Sac Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 24-Apr-15 33900
ND LaMoure Mississippi Commercial Mixed Poultry EA/AM-H5N2 24-Apr-15 71500
WI Jefferson Mississippi Commercial Chickens EA/AM-H5N2 24-Apr-15 1031000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 24-Apr-15 42900
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 24-Apr-15 67000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 24-Apr-15 68000
WI Chippewa Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 23-Apr-15 56,500
MN Clay Mississippi Commercial Chickens EA/AM-H5N2 23-Apr-15 175,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 23-Apr-15 pending
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 23-Apr-15 pending
MN Pipestone Mississippi Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 150
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 62,600
MN Otter Tail Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 34,500
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 58,900
MN Redwood Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 35,500
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 75,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 19,100
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 34,500
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 21-Apr-15 61,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 21-Apr-15 130,400
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 28,600
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 22-Apr-15 72,500
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 21-Apr-15 53,900
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 21-Apr-15 pending
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 21-Apr-15 10,700
MN Cottonwood Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 30,000
IA Osceola Mississippi Commercial Chickens EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 3,800,000
MN Wadena Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 301,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 61,000
SD Spink Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 33,300
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 17-Apr-15 9,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 17-Apr-15 23,000
WI Juneau Mississippi Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 17-Apr-15 33
MN Roseau Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 16-Apr-15 26,000
WI Barron Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 16-Apr-15 126,700
MN Kandiyoh Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 15-Apr-15 152,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 15-Apr-15 67,000
MN Otter Tail Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 15-Apr-15 21,000
SD Roberts Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 15-Apr-15 66,600
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 20,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 30,000
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 25,000
MN Redwood Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 56,000
MN Swift Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 154,000
IA Buena Vista Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 13-Apr-15 27,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 13-Apr-15 76,000
MN Swift Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 13-Apr-15 160,000
MN Le Sueur Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 11-Apr-15 21,500
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 11-Apr-15 38,000
WI Jefferson Mississippi Commercial Chickens EA/AM-H5N2 11-Apr-15 200,000
ND Dickey Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 10-Apr-15 40,000
SD McCook Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 10-Apr-15 53,000
SD McPherson Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 10-Apr-15 46,000
MN Cottonwood Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Apr-15 48,000
MN Lyon Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Apr-15 66,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Apr-15 45,000
MN Watonwan Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Apr-15 30,000
SD Kingsbury Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 8-Apr-15 34,000
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 7-Apr-15 310,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 7-Apr-15 30,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 4-Apr-15 26,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 4-Apr-15 76,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 2-Apr-15 71,000
MN Nobles Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 2-Apr-15 21,000
MT Judith Basin Central Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 2-Apr-15 40
SD Beadle Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 1-Apr-15 53,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 28-Mar-15 39,000
MN Lac Qui Parle Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 27-Mar-15 66,000
KS Leavenworth Central Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 13-Mar-15 10
AR Boone Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 11-Mar-15 40,020
MO Moniteau Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 10-Mar-15 13,850
MO Jasper Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Mar-15 15,620
MN Pope Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 4-Mar-15 26,310
OR Deschutes Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 17-Feb-15 70
CA Kings Pacific Commercial Chicken EA-H5N8 12-Feb-15 112,900
WA Okanogan Pacific Backyard Chicken EA/AM-H5N2 3-Feb-15 40
WA Okanogan Pacific Backyard Pheasant EA/AM-H5N2 29-Jan-15 5830
CA Stanislaus Pacific Commercial Turkeys EA-H5N8 23-Jan-15 134,400
ID Canyon Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 16-Jan-15 30
WA Clallam Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 16-Jan-15 110
WA Benton Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 9-Jan-15 590
WA Benton Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 3-Jan-15 140
OR Douglas Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA -H5N8 19-Dec-14 130
Totals 7,837,073
* References to EA and AM under avian influenza subtype indicate Eurasian and American strains of the virus.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/ap ... fic_flyway

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2015 11:32 pm 
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Avian flu hits more farms in Iowa, Minnesota
Filed Under: Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)
Robert Roos and Lisa Schnirring | Staff Writers | CIDRAP News | Apr 27, 2015

Image
Egg production
Ioan Florin Cnejevici / iStock

More than 9 million laying hens on Iowa egg farms are newly affected by H5 avian flu.
Five more large chicken farms in northwestern Iowa, including egg-laying operations housing more than 9 million birds in all, have been hit by probable H5N2 avian influenza outbreaks, while the virus has invaded at least four more turkey flocks in Minnesota, according to reports today.

In addition, H5N2 has surfaced on another turkey farm in southern Ontario, while poultry workers associated with outbreaks in Minnesota are receiving an antiviral drug as a precaution.

Massive Iowa operations hit
The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDA) today announced five more H5 avian flu outbreaks, affecting commercial farms in three counties in the northwestern corner of the state, two of which are reporting their first outbreaks.

The newly affected counties, O'Brien and Sioux, each reported two outbreaks. The fifth outbreak is in Osceola County, which earlier this month had an outbreak on a commercial chicken farm.

Four of the outbreaks are detailed in an IDA press release, and, at a media telebriefing today, Iowa Agriculture Secretary Bill Northey announced a fifth outbreak in Sioux County. Officials are awaiting final subtyping test results for all five events, but they believe the results will be positive for the highly pathogenic H5N2 strain responsible for outbreaks in Iowa and other Midwestern states.

The sites include a pullet facility raising layer chickens in Osceola County, two egg-laying operations in O'Brien County, a laying operation in Sioux County, and a turkey facility in Sioux County. In total, the five new Iowa outbreak affect 9.5 million layers, 250,000 pullets, and 80,000 turkeys.

Northey said that so far the outbreak impact has been limited, as Iowa's layer population is 60 million birds. However, he said if the outbreaks continue, they have the potential to cause major losses.

At today's telebriefing, T.J. Myers, VMD, associate deputy administrator of the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Veterinary Services, said the agency has indemnity funds to help farmers recover from the outbreaks, and since December has paid out $60 million.

Today's update from the USDA's APHIS included details on outbreaks that were first reported at the end of last week. It said the second outbreak in Wisconsin's Jefferson County, on a layer farm, has now affected 1,031,000 birds, up from 800,000 when state officials first announced the outbreak on Apr 22.

Minnesota outbreaks
In Minnesota, the top turkey-producing county, Kandiyohi, had its 18th and 19th outbreaks, on farms holding 42,900 and 67,000 turkeys, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) reported today.

In addition, Chippewa County in southwestern Minnesota reported its first outbreak, on a farm with 68,000 turkeys, and a fourth outbreak surfaced in Redwood County on a farm with 24,300 turkeys, the DPS said. Another flock in Redwood County will also be euthanized because it was identified as "a dangerous contact" of other sites.

The DPS also said the USDA confirmed Kandiyohi's 11th outbreak, which was apparently included in numbers mentioned earlier by the Minnesota Board of Animal Health (MBAH). The board now says 55 farms in 18 counties have been hit, with 3.11 million birds lost. That number does not include the birds on several farms where information is still being gathered.

APHIS's official tally of H5N2 outbreaks notes that about 7.7 million US poultry have been affected. That number does not include the newest Iowa outbreaks, which are not yet definitively categorized as H5N2 events.

Third Ontario farm affected
Elsewhere, a third H5N2 outbreak has been identified in southern Ontario's Oxford County, according to Canadian media and government reports.

A CBC News report yesterday said the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) estimated that 8,000 turkeys on the latest affected farm will be euthanized to stop the virus.

The CFIA released little information about the outbreak, but noted in a timeline of events that it confirmed the virus as H5N2 on Apr 24. The agency said the farm has been under quarantine since Apr 19 and is part of the second avian flu control zone established because of the outbreaks.

The first outbreak was detected at a turkey farm near Woodstock, Ont., on Apr 5, and the second one was found on a chicken farm on Apr 18, according to the CFIA.

Workers get precautionary antiviral
In other developments, a Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) official said today that 73 people exposed to H5N2 during the state's outbreaks have agreed to take the antiviral oseltamivir (Tamiflu) as a precaution, although no human cases have been identified.

MDH spokesman Michael Schommer told CIDRAP News that the agency is currently monitoring 86 poultry workers for possible flu symptoms, including respiratory problems and eye infections. He said 74 people have completed 10 days of monitoring, with no infections detected. No human H5N2 cases have been reported anywhere to date.

"We've recommended Tamiflu for 93 people, and 73 people have agreed to take Tamiflu," Schommer said.

He also said 11 people in the program had cold-like symptoms, and resulting tests determined they did not have the virus.

No high-path findings in Minnesota wild birds
Although officials believe the H5N2 virus was brought to the Midwest by wild birds, a wide-ranging sampling program in Minnesota has failed to find any wild birds infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) so far, according to Michelle Carstensen, PhD, wildlife health program supervisor for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

The DNR has been collecting fecal samples from waterfowl within 10 kilometers of outbreak sites in five counties, aiming to gather enough to provide 95% confidence of finding the virus if present in 1% of birds. For control sampling, the agency is also collecting similar numbers at wildlife management areas that are not close to any outbreaks.

Carstensen reported on Apr 25 that the DNR has submitted 2,314 fecal samples for testing, including 1,740 from waterfowl in areas near infected farms and 574 from control sites. Test results on 915 of these revealed no HPAI viruses and just seven low-pathogenic viruses, she said.

The DNR also has submitted samples from 21 wild birds that were found dead or sick, including raptors, wild turkeys, and other species, she reported. Eight results have come back, and all were negative for HPAI.

Testing of samples from hunter-killed wild turkeys is just beginning, Carstensen said. A first batch of 18 samples was submitted for testing Apr 23, and more will be submitted this week.

Preliminary testing is done by the USDA's National Wildlife Disease Laboratory in Ft. Collins, Colo., according to the DNR's surveillance plan. Any samples that are positive for H5 or H7 viruses then go to the USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa, for confirmation and further typing.

See also:

Apr 27 IDA press release

USDA list of outbreaks

Apr 27 Minnesota DPS statement

MBAH list of Minnesota outbreaks

CFIA timeline of events in Canada

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspect ... -minnesota

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2015 11:42 pm 
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For Immediate Release
Monday, April 27, 2015

Dustin Vande Hoef
515/281-3375 or 515/326-1616 (cell)
or Dustin.VandeHoef@IowaAgriculture.gov

FIVE PROBABLE CASES OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA IN OSCEOLA, O’BRIEN AND SIOUX COUNTIES

Media Advisory:
The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship and USDA will host a press conference call at 3:15 p.m. on Monday, April 27, 2015 to discuss the additional avian influenza cases in Iowa.

Call in number: 866-685-1580
Conference code: 5152818615



FIVE PROBABLE CASES OF HIGHLY PATHOGENIC AVIAN INFLUENZA IN OSCEOLA, O’BRIEN AND SIOUX COUNTIES
CDC considers the risk to people to be low

DES MOINES – The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship is responding to five probable cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in commercial poultry farms in Osceola, O’Brien and Sioux Counties in Northwest Iowa. These five new cases would join three confirmed cases of the disease in Iowa. State officials have quarantined the premises and if the initial test are confirmed, all birds on the property will be humanely euthanized to prevent the spread of the disease.

Osceola County 2 – Pullet farm with an estimated 250,000 birds. Initial testing showed it positive for H5 avian influenza. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames.

O’Brien County 1 – Commercial laying operation with an estimated 240,000 birds that has experienced increased mortality. Initial testing showed it positive for H5 avian influenza. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames.

O’Brien County 2 – Commercial laying operation with an estimated 98,000 birds that has experienced increased mortality. Initial testing showed it positive for H5 avian influenza. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames.

Sioux County 1 – Commercial laying operation with an estimated 1.7 million birds that has experienced increased mortality. Initial testing showed it positive for H5 avian influenza. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames.

Sioux County 2 – Commercial laying operation with an estimated 3.8 million birds that has experienced increased mortality. Initial testing showed it positive for H5 avian influenza. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames.

The Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Iowa Department of Public Health considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with the virus have ever been detected there is no food safety risk for consumers.

The United States has the strongest Avian Influenza (AI) surveillance program in the world. As part of the existing USDA avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners as well as industry are responding quickly and decisively to these outbreaks by following these five basic steps: 1) Quarantine – restricting movement of poultry and poultry-moving equipment into and out of the control area; 2) Eradicate – humanely euthanizing the affected flock(s); 3) Monitor region – testing wild and domestic birds in a broad area around the quarantine area; 4) Disinfect – kills the virus in the affected flock locations; and 5) Test – confirm that poultry farms in the area are free of the virus.

The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship in partnership with the Iowa Department of Public Health are working directly with poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure proper precautions are being taken.

These virus strains can travel in wild birds without those birds appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard flock owners, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to state/federal officials, either through their state veterinarian at 515-281-5321 or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593.

Information will also be posted to the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship’s website at http://www.iowaagriculture.gov/avianinfluenza.asp.

http://www.iowaagriculture.gov/press/20 ... 272015.asp

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2015 12:01 am 
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Another round of avian influenza rocks Iowa
By Robin Baumgarn Today at 10:50 p.m.

SIBLEY, Iowa — Five more probable cases of avian influenza in northwest Iowa were reported Monday by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship.

The report brings the total cases up to eight for the state. Osceola County now has a reported second case of the disease discovered initially last week at Sunrise Farms in Harris, Iowa. Additionally, two cases have turned up in O’Brien County, as well as two more in commercial facilities in Sioux County.

Osceola County was the only case of the five to not be in laying hens. Instead, this time, a pullet farm has initially tested positive for H5N2. The flock of an estimated 250,000 birds were quarantined over the weekend, according to Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey.

Northey noted that the birds were being raised with the intention of filling a layer barn.

The two O’Brien County cases are in commercial laying operations. The first involves an estimated 240,000 birds; the second involves 98,000. Additional confirmatory testing is pending from the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames.

The two commercial facilities in Sioux County are much larger with approximately 1.7 million and 3.8 million laying hens, respectively. The outbreaks are the first reports of avian influenza in the county; there had been no reports in O’Brien County, either.

At this time, there are no other known cases of the disease in the state.

“This has certainly been a challenging past couple of months for the U.S., and Iowa is just one example of how tough this situation can be,” Dr. T.J. Myers, an associate deputy administrator with the USDA, said. “However, I think it is a testament to the surveillance program that we have in the U.S. that we are finding these cases and are able to respond to them quickly.”

Myers said the United States has only had three major cases of HPAI historically. The most severe prior to this one was in 1983, when approximately 17 million birds were depopulated in Pennsylvania.

This time, Meyer noted that seven million birds have already been destroyed. Since December, the government has paid out $60 million in indemnities to owners of affected flocks.

“We’re going to continue to support the states and producers in dealing with this,” Myers said. “We’re also working with Congress — the department is — to make sure that we have sufficient funding to address the issue and provide this much-needed safety net to the poultry producers who are experiencing these economic hardships.”

The Center for Disease Control still assures the risk to humans from avian flu is very low. Myers added that the surveillance system employed by the USDA of the disease means it’s highly unlikely that any meat from infected poultry would enter the food supply.

Poultry producers are encouraged to keep flocks away from wild birds. They should also maintain good biosecurity measures to limit the possibility of transferring the disease to a flock.

Northey noted that 9.5 million laying hens have so far been impacted out of Iowa’s nearly 60 million layers, which will also result in economic implications.

“Certainly Iowa’s numbers are bigger than most states,” Northey said. “There are a lot of states out there under 30 million layers, so this is a big number. Certainly there’s a lot of healthy active birds out there still laying eggs, and we hope this doesn’t move beyond this. We don’t know what’s going to happen next.

“There is a big economic impact certainly if you’re the farm that’s impacted here,” he continued. “The loss of the birds in some part is indemnified by USDA. The cost of putting these birds down in a safe manner is also in part indemnified by USDA, but there’s a lot of loss of income over time and there certainly could be impact in the total market size at some point as well.”

Northey wasn’t sure of the potential impact on consumers.

“It really depends how far this thing goes,” he said. “We are talking numbers of turkeys in Minnesota. We’re talking about 80,000 birds (turkeys) in Iowa, we’re talking north of two and a half million birds in Minnesota. That’s a big number. That’s somewhere one-fourth to one-fifth of the turkeys in Minnesota. They’re the biggest producer, that could have an impact.

“We’re at the place where we have nearly 10 million layers in Iowa. That could have an impact as well. Again, over time, it’s really about are we done or does this include more birds as we go forward.”

Myers said he didn’t think there would be a major market impact at this point terms of turkeys, but added that the next few weeks will be telling if the virus continues to spread.

http://www.dglobe.com/news/3732639-anot ... rocks-iowa

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2015 12:03 am 
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Five more Iowa farms report bird flu

Image
04/27/2015 07:47 PM04/27/2015 07:48 PM

State officials say the bird flu virus has been found in a large egg-laying flock in northwest Iowa, plus four more poultry farms.

Initial tests indicated the presence of the H5N2 virus on an egg-laying farm with 3.7 million chickens in Sioux County.

Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey said Monday the virus will cost producers about a sixth of Iowa's 60 million hens.

Northey says other probable cases have been identified at two farms in O'Brien County, one in Osceola County and another in Sioux County. More than 2 million chickens combined were on those farms.

Final confirmation of tests is expected later Monday or Tuesday. If confirmed, all of the birds will be killed to prevent spread of the disease.

http://www.ourquadcities.com/story/d/st ... GaoE6shf_g

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2015 12:07 am 
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New Iowa Cases of Bird Flu, 6 Million Poultry Affected
By SARAH BODEN • 2 HOURS AGO

Image
FLICKR / FAOALC

More than 6 million hens and juvenile chickens in northwest Iowa will be euthanized pending final confirmation of H5N2. The Iowa Department of Agriculture reports a total of five flocks may be affected by this highly pathogenic strain of avian flu.

H5N2 poses no food safety dangers, and there has never been a reported case of the virus in humans, but there is concern regarding the economic impact of the virus.

State officials have established a 10-kilometer quarantine around farms in O'Brien, Osceola and Sioux Counties. If initial tests confirm the strain of flu, all the birds on the properties will be euthanized to prevent its spread.

With the confirmation of these new cases, Iowa will have eight H5N2 outbreaks with nearly 9.9 million individual birds affected.

Iowa is the country’s largest egg producer. Nearly one of five eggs consumed nationwide is from Iowa.

This virus has plagued poultry farms around the upper Midwest and may cause price increases of eggs and turkey meat at the grocery store.

"It likely could have some impact, I don’t know what that is," says Iowa Secretary of State Bill Northey. "Certainly people can buy different meats, so it doesn’t always have as big as impact as it seems. Even though to producers it’s a huge, huge deal."

The United States Department of Agriculture compensates producers for euthanized birds, but not for the birds killed by the virus. H5N2 can wipe out entire flock within days.

"The turkeys will go off water and feed. And once they start doing that it doesn't take very long for the birds, you're talking hours at times, for the birds to become very lethargic...followed pretty rapidly by death," says Dr. John Clifford, the USDA's Chief Veterinary Officer. "In the chickens...you can see a drop in egg production. And some of the same symptoms of going off feed and being lethargic prior to death."

Northey says the economic impact of each H5N2 outbreak extends beyond individual poultry farmer.

"If you've got a facility that’s producing 4-million eggs, they’re using about 4-million bushels of corn a year," Northey says. "Certainly the soybean meal, a lot of employees, other impacts at that site from electricity, to the liter that was going to replace fertilizer. Lots of other things."

Is is unclear how long each of five affected sites will be out of commission. The larger the flock size, the longer the eradication and cleaning period.

Iowa's first case of H5N2, a Buena Vista turkey farm, has finished euthanizing it's 27,000 birds. Now another round of testing for traces of the virus is underway.

It is unclear how much money Iowa has to mitigate this crisis. At one time, the state's avian influenza fund contained roughly $137,000.

"We just haven't done the math yet to know exactly where we're at, whether we've spent $10,000 of that or $100,000." says Northey. "Last time I think that money was added to that fund was 2010. We have not used that fund until this round."

The fund pays for testing and sampling of birds, as well as staffing and millage.

It's unclear why H5N2 is affecting the upper Midwest more than other parts of the country. Researchers say the disease spreads through the feces of migratory waterfowl like geese or ducks, which are unaffected by the virus.

Poultry producers have taken bio security measures such as disinfecting feed trucks with spray and having staff wear plastic clothing. Northey says it is possible the virus reaches flocks through a barn's ventilation.

H5N2's spread is expected to drop off in the summer. The USDA says the virus does not survive as well in warmer, dry weather.

"The other thing is that as we get into the spring and the summertime we also have a lot more sunshine. And with the sunshine comes ultraviolent and ultraviolet will kill influenza virus," says Dr. David Swayne of the USDA's Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory. "It's kind of hard to just predict a particular date...It involves the climate, the temperature itself, and the amount of humidity."

Swayne's lab is in early stages of developing a H5N2 vaccine. Even if a vaccine is found, it may not be feasible to inoculate flocks that reach thousands if not millions of birds.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises people steer clear of wild birds as well as bird feces, and to avoid contact with poultry that appear ill or dead.

http://iowapublicradio.org/post/new-iow ... y-affected

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2015 6:22 am 
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Bird flu cases in the state go up quickly as more tests come in

April 28, 2015 By Dar Danielson
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Ag Secretary Bill Northey.
The number of bird flu cases in the state more than doubled Monday in a rapidly changing situation. The Iowa Department of Agriculture issued a news release that it was investigating four probable news cases of the avian flu in commercial poultry farms in Osceola, O’Brien and Sioux Counties in Northwest Iowa. By the time Ag Secretary Bill Northey held a conference call with reporters at 3:15, he had a fifth possible case to report in Sioux County.
“That is 3.7 million layers, that also has turned in a presumptive positive, a probable case of H-5 as well,” Northey says. The other facilities are a commercial laying operation in Sioux County with 1.7 million birds, two egg laying facilities in O’Brien County, one with 240,000 birds, and the other with 98,000 birds. Northey was asked about the impact on the state’s egg industry thus far.
“Total numbers were are talking about here is about 9.5 million layers that would be impacted, that’s out of the nearly 60 million layers we have here in Iowa, so we’re talking one-sixth,” Northey says. “Certainly Iowa’s numbers are bigger than most states, there’s a lot of states out there under 30 million layers — so this is a big number.”
The other new probable case of the H5N2 virus involves 250,000 pullets in Osceola County. Pullets are chickens that become egg layers once they are grown. There are also two confirmed cases of the disease in turkey farms in Buena Vista and Sac County. Northey was asked about the impact of the disease on the price of turkeys and chicken products from the disease in Iowa and other states.
“We’re talking about 80,000 birds in Iowa, we’re talking north of two-and-a-half million birds in Minnesota, turkeys, that’s a big number. That’s somewhere near one fourth to one fifth of the turkeys in Minnesota, they’re the biggest producer. That could have an impact,” Northey says. “We’re at the point of nearly 10 million layers in Iowa, that could have an impact as well.”
Northey says the impact depends on how many more cases are found in the state, and he says they can’t predict that. Minnesota’s governor declared a state of emergency following the influenza outbreak there. Northey says his staff and the U.S.D.A. have been handling things at this point and he isn’t sure if Iowa will need such a declaration. “I think we will continue to have conversations about what that might get us. What kind of help that will get us as well. I’m certainly not ready to announce anything like that today, and don’t know if that would come or will come in the future,” Northey says. He says all the animals at the first turkey plant identified with the disease have been destroyed and the birds at the second plant will be destroyed this week. Northey says the new facilities have been quarantined, and they are investigating nearby facilities for more possible cases.
Veterinarian T.J. Myers of the U.S.D.A. joined Northey on the call and says there has not been any cases of avian flu in humans. He says the quick quarantine measures used also provide other protections.”It’s highly unlikely that any meat from affected poultry would get into the food supply,” according to Myers. Doctor Myers says they anticipate warmer temperatures will lead to a drop in avian flu cases, as the disease thrives in colder temperatures. Myers says outbreaks of this type are relatively rare.
“We’ve only had three other outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in the past century in the U.S.,” Myers says. “And the most severe prior to what we are dealing with currently was in 1983.” Myers says the disease is believed to be spread by wild waterfowl.

http://www.radioiowa.com/2015/04/28/bir ... s-come-in/

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