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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 10:46 am 
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APHIS confirms Fujian H5N2 Jefferson County Wisconsin 200,000 chickens

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 10:47 am 
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USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Jefferson County, Wisconsin
Last Modified: Apr 13, 2015 Print
CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low

WASHINGTON, April 13, 2015 -- The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza (HPAI) in a commercial layer flock in Jefferson County, Wisconsin. The flock of 200,000 chickens is located within the Mississippi flyway where this strain of avian influenza has previously been identified. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

Samples from the turkey flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratoryy and the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa confirmed the findings. NVSL is the only internationally recognized AI reference laboratory in the United States. APHIS is working closely with the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world. As part of the existing USDA avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners as well as industry are responding quickly and decisively to these outbreaks by following these five basic steps: 1) Quarantine – restricting movement of poultry and poultry-moving equipment into and out of the control area; 2) Eradicate – humanely euthanizing the affected flock(s); 3) Monitor region – testing wild and domestic birds in a broad area around the quarantine area; 4) Disinfect – kills the virus in the affected flock locations; and 5) Test – confirming that the poultry farm is AI virus-free. USDA also is working with its partners to actively look and test for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.

The Wisconsin Department of Health is working directly with poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure that they are taking the proper precautions. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses.

USDA will include the confirmation information in routine updates to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), and will notify international trading partners of this finding as appropriate. OIE trade guidelines call on countries to base trade restrictions on sound science and, whenever possible, limit restrictions to those animals and animal products within a defined region that pose a risk of spreading disease of concern.

These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.

Additional background

Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity (low or high)— the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic chickens.

The HPAI H5N8 virus originated in Asia and spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014, including the Pacific flyway. In the Pacific flyway, the HPAI H5N8 virus has mixed with North American avian influenza viruses, creating new mixed-origin viruses. These mixed-origin viruses contain the Asian-origin H5 part of the virus, which is highly pathogenic to poultry. The N parts of these viruses came from North American low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

USDA has identified two mixed-origin viruses in the Pacific Flyway: the HPAI H5N2 virus and new HPAI H5N1 virus. The new HPAI H5N1 virus is not the same virus as the HPAI H5N1 virus found in Asia, Europe and Africa that has caused some human illness. Only the HPAI H5N2 virus has been detected in the Pacific, Mississippi and Central Flyways.

Detailed analysis of the virus is underway in cooperation with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For more information about the ongoing avian influenza disease incidents visit the APHIS website. More information about avian influenza can be found on the USDA avian influenza page. More information about avian influenza and public health is available on the CDC website.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/ap ... fferson_wi

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 10:58 am 
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Last Modified: Apr 13, 2015 Print
A Threat to U.S. Poultry

Worldwide, there are many strains of avian influenza (AI) virus that can cause varying degrees of clinical illness in poultry. AI viruses can infect chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, ducks, geese and guinea fowl, as well as a wide variety of other birds. Migratory waterfowl have proved to be a natural reservoir for the less infectious strains of the disease.

AI viruses can be classified as highly pathogenic (HPAI) or low pathogenic (LPAI) strains based on the severity of the illness they cause. HPAI is an extremely infectious and fatal form of the disease that, once established, can spread rapidly from flock to flock and has also been known to affect humans. LPAI typically causes only minor illness, and sometimes manifests no clinical signs. However, some LPAI virus strains are capable of mutating under field conditions into HPAI viruses.

USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) works to keep HPAI from becoming established in the U.S. poultry population.

Press Releases and Updates

Update on Current Avian Influenza Findings
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Jefferson County, Wisconsin; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Dickey County, North Dakota
USDA Confirms 3rd Case of Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 in Two Counties in South Dakota; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Cases in Four Minnesota Counties; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Kingsbury County, South Dakota; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Meeker County, Minnesota
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in 2nd Kandiyohi County, Minnesota Commercial Turkey Flock;CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota Commercial Turkey Flock; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in 3rd Stearns County, Minnesota Commercial Turkey Flock; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Backyard Flock in Montana; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in 2nd Stearns County, Minnesota Commercial Turkey Flock; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Nobles County, Minnesota Commercial Turkey Flock; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Beadle County, South Dakota Commercial Turkey Flock; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Stearns County, Minnesota Commercial Turkey Flock; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Commercial Turkey Flock in Minnesota; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Wild Bird in Wyoming; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
Looking Into the Latest High Path AI Cases (audio)
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Backyard Flock in Kansas; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low.
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Commercial Turkey Flock in Arkansas ; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Commercial Turkey Flocks in Missouri; CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low
USDA Confirms H5N2 Avian Influenza in Commercial Turkey Flock in Minnesota; First Finding in the Mississippi Flyway
Highly Pathogenic H5N8 Avian Influenza Confirmed in Commercial Turkey Flock in California - No immediate public health concern; detected strain is not known to harm humans (January 24, 2015)
H5N8 Found in Backyard Poultry in Oregon; Virus not found in commercial poultry in U.S. - No public health concern at this time (December 19, 2014)
USDA Confirms H5 Avian Influenza in Washington State Wild Birds; H5N2 Found in Northern Pintail Ducks & H5N8 Found in Captive Gyrfalcons (December 16, 2014)

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 10:59 am 
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Last Modified: Apr 13, 2015 Print
Since December 2014, the United States Department of Agriculture has confirmed several cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 in the Pacific, Central, and Mississippi flyways (or migratory bird paths). The disease has been found in wild birds, as well as in a few backyard and commercial poultry flocks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections to be low. No human cases of these HPAI H5 viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada, or internationally.


Poultry Findings Confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories Include:

State County Flyway Flock type Species Avian influenza subtype* Confirmation date
WI Jefferson Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 11, 2015
ND Dickey Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 11, 2015
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 11, 2015
SD McCook Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 10, 2015
SD McPherson Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 10, 2015
MN Cottonwood Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 9, 2015
MN Lyon Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 9, 2015
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 9, 2015
MN Watonwan Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 9, 2015
SD Kingsbury Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 8, 2015
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 8, 2015
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 7, 2015|
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 4, 2015
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 4, 2015
MT Judith Basin Central Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 April 2, 2015
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 2, 2015
SD Beadle Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 1, 2015
MN Nobles Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 2, 2015
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 28, 2015
MN Lac Qui Parle Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 27, 2015
KS Leavenworth Central Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 March 13, 2015
AR Boone Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 11, 2015
MO Moniteau Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 10, 2015
MO Jasper Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 9, 2015
MN Pope Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 4, 2015
OR Deschutes Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 February 17, 2015
CA Kings Pacific Commercial Chicken EA-H5N8 February 12, 2015
WA Okanogan Pacific Backyard Chicken EA/AM-H5N2 February 3, 2015
WA Okanogan Pacific Backyard Pheasant EA/AM-H5N2 January 29, 2015
CA Stanislaus Pacific Commercial Turkeys EA-H5N8 January 23, 2015
ID Canyon Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 January 16, 2015
WA Clallam Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 January 16, 2015
WA Benton Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 January 9, 2015
OR Douglas Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 January 3, 2015




Captive Wild Bird Findings Confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories:

State County Species Avian influenza subtype* Confirmation date
MT Flathead Captive gyrfalcon EA/AM-H5N2 March 27, 2015
MO St. Louis Captive falcon (hybrid) EA/AM-H5N2 March 27, 2015
ID Kootenai Captive gyrfalcon (2) EA-H5N8 January 29, 2015
February 6, 2015
ID Canyon Captive falcons,
Great horned owl EA/AM-H5N2 January 16, 2015
February 2, 2015
WA Whatcom Captive gyrfalcon EA-H5N8 December 14, 2014


Wild Bird Findings confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories are available here.

Surveillance for avian influenza is ongoing in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets, and in migratory wild bird populations.

USDA is coordinating closely with its partners, including Arkansas, California, Idaho, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington State officials, the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, on avian influenza surveillance, reporting, and control efforts. The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, where we actively look for the disease and provide 100% compensation to affected producers to encourage reporting.

USDA continues to inform OIE and international trading partners of these findings. USDA is working with trading partners to minimize trade impacts on poultry and poultry products as much as possible.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, need to continue practicing good biosecurity, preventing contact between their birds and wild birds, and reporting sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through your state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov

USDA emphasizes that poultry, poultry products and wild birds (see biosecurity and wild birds) are safe to eat if they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Background Information

The H5N8 virus originated in Asia and spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014, including the Pacific flyway. In the Pacific flyway, the H5N8 virus has mixed with North American avian influenza viruses, creating new mixed-origin viruses. This is not unexpected. These mixed-origin viruses contain the Asian-origin H5 part of the virus, which is highly pathogenic to poultry. The N parts of these viruses came from North American low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

USDA has identified two mixed-origin viruses in the Pacific Flyway: the H5N2 virus and new H5N1 virus. The new H5N1 virus is not the same virus as the H5N1 virus found in Asia that has caused some human illness. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections to be low. Detailed analysis of the virus is underway in cooperation with CDC.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:00 am 
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Map update

https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid= ... NlIM&hl=en

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:46 am 
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USDA Confirms Highly Pathogenic H5N2 Avian Influenza in Jefferson County, Wisconsin
Last Modified: Apr 13, 2015 Print
CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low

WASHINGTON, April 13, 2015 -- The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza (HPAI) in a commercial layer flock in Jefferson County, Wisconsin. The flock of 200,000 chickens is located within the Mississippi flyway where this strain of avian influenza has previously been identified. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with the virus have been detected at this time.

Samples from the chicken flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratoryy and the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa confirmed the findings. NVSL is the only internationally recognized AI reference laboratory in the United States. APHIS is working closely with the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the premises and birds on the property will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.

The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world. As part of the existing USDA avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners as well as industry are responding quickly and decisively to these outbreaks by following these five basic steps: 1) Quarantine – restricting movement of poultry and poultry-moving equipment into and out of the control area; 2) Eradicate – humanely euthanizing the affected flock(s); 3) Monitor region – testing wild and domestic birds in a broad area around the quarantine area; 4) Disinfect – kills the virus in the affected flock locations; and 5) Test – confirming that the poultry farm is AI virus-free. USDA also is working with its partners to actively look and test for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.

The Wisconsin Department of Health is working directly with poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure that they are taking the proper precautions. As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165 ˚F kills bacteria and viruses.

USDA will include the confirmation information in routine updates to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), and will notify international trading partners of this finding as appropriate. OIE trade guidelines call on countries to base trade restrictions on sound science and, whenever possible, limit restrictions to those animals and animal products within a defined region that pose a risk of spreading disease of concern.

These virus strains can travel in wild birds without them appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife. If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, should continue to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.

Additional background

Avian influenza (AI) is caused by an influenza type A virus which can infect poultry (such as chickens, turkeys, pheasants, quail, domestic ducks, geese and guinea fowl) and is carried by free flying waterfowl such as ducks, geese and shorebirds. AI viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and can be further broken down into different strains. AI viruses are further classified by their pathogenicity (low or high)— the ability of a particular virus strain to produce disease in domestic chickens.

The HPAI H5N8 virus originated in Asia and spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014, including the Pacific flyway. In the Pacific flyway, the HPAI H5N8 virus has mixed with North American avian influenza viruses, creating new mixed-origin viruses. These mixed-origin viruses contain the Asian-origin H5 part of the virus, which is highly pathogenic to poultry. The N parts of these viruses came from North American low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

USDA has identified two mixed-origin viruses in the Pacific Flyway: the HPAI H5N2 virus and new HPAI H5N1 virus. The new HPAI H5N1 virus is not the same virus as the HPAI H5N1 virus found in Asia, Europe and Africa that has caused some human illness. Only the HPAI H5N2 virus has been detected in the Pacific, Mississippi and Central Flyways.

Detailed analysis of the virus is underway in cooperation with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For more information about the ongoing avian influenza disease incidents visit the APHIS website. More information about avian influenza can be found on the USDA avian influenza page. More information about avian influenza and public health is available on the CDC website.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/ap ... fferson_wi

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:49 am 
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Update on Avian Influenza Findings
Last Modified: Apr 13, 2015 Print
Since December 2014, the United States Department of Agriculture has confirmed several cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 in the Pacific, Central, and Mississippi flyways (or migratory bird paths). The disease has been found in wild birds, as well as in a few backyard and commercial poultry flocks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections to be low. No human cases of these HPAI H5 viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada, or internationally.


Poultry Findings Confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories Include:

State County Flyway Flock type Species Avian influenza subtype* Confirmation date
WI Jefferson Mississippi Commercial Chickens EA/AM-H5N2 April 11, 2015
ND Dickey Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 11, 2015
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 11, 2015
SD McCook Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 10, 2015
SD McPherson Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 10, 2015
MN Cottonwood Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 9, 2015
MN Lyon Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 9, 2015
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 9, 2015
MN Watonwan Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 9, 2015
SD Kingsbury Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 8, 2015
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 8, 2015
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 7, 2015|
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 4, 2015
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 4, 2015
MT Judith Basin Central Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 April 2, 2015
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 2, 2015
SD Beadle Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 1, 2015
MN Nobles Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 April 2, 2015
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 28, 2015
MN Lac Qui Parle Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 27, 2015
KS Leavenworth Central Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 March 13, 2015
AR Boone Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 11, 2015
MO Moniteau Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 10, 2015
MO Jasper Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 9, 2015
MN Pope Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 March 4, 2015
OR Deschutes Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 February 17, 2015
CA Kings Pacific Commercial Chicken EA-H5N8 February 12, 2015
WA Okanogan Pacific Backyard Chicken EA/AM-H5N2 February 3, 2015
WA Okanogan Pacific Backyard Pheasant EA/AM-H5N2 January 29, 2015
CA Stanislaus Pacific Commercial Turkeys EA-H5N8 January 23, 2015
ID Canyon Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 January 16, 2015
WA Clallam Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 January 16, 2015
WA Benton Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 January 9, 2015
OR Douglas Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 January 3, 2015




Captive Wild Bird Findings Confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories:

State County Species Avian influenza subtype* Confirmation date
MT Flathead Captive gyrfalcon EA/AM-H5N2 March 27, 2015
MO St. Louis Captive falcon (hybrid) EA/AM-H5N2 March 27, 2015
ID Kootenai Captive gyrfalcon (2) EA-H5N8 January 29, 2015
February 6, 2015
ID Canyon Captive falcons,
Great horned owl EA/AM-H5N2 January 16, 2015
February 2, 2015
WA Whatcom Captive gyrfalcon EA-H5N8 December 14, 2014


Wild Bird Findings confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories are available here.

Surveillance for avian influenza is ongoing in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets, and in migratory wild bird populations.

USDA is coordinating closely with its partners, including Arkansas, California, Idaho, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington State officials, the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, on avian influenza surveillance, reporting, and control efforts. The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, where we actively look for the disease and provide 100% compensation to affected producers to encourage reporting.

USDA continues to inform OIE and international trading partners of these findings. USDA is working with trading partners to minimize trade impacts on poultry and poultry products as much as possible.

All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, need to continue practicing good biosecurity, preventing contact between their birds and wild birds, and reporting sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through your state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov

USDA emphasizes that poultry, poultry products and wild birds (see biosecurity and wild birds) are safe to eat if they are properly handled and cooked to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Background Information

The H5N8 virus originated in Asia and spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014, including the Pacific flyway. In the Pacific flyway, the H5N8 virus has mixed with North American avian influenza viruses, creating new mixed-origin viruses. This is not unexpected. These mixed-origin viruses contain the Asian-origin H5 part of the virus, which is highly pathogenic to poultry. The N parts of these viruses came from North American low pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

USDA has identified two mixed-origin viruses in the Pacific Flyway: the H5N2 virus and new H5N1 virus. The new H5N1 virus is not the same virus as the H5N1 virus found in Asia that has caused some human illness. CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections to be low. Detailed analysis of the virus is underway in cooperation with CDC.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/ap ... fic_flyway

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 12:49 pm 
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DATCP implementing response to contain, eliminate avian influenza virus in Wisconsin
April 13, 2015

DATCP implementing response to contain, eliminate avian influenza virus in Wisconsin (PDF)

Media Contacts: Raechelle Cline, 608-224-5005 or 608-575-6416 or Jim Dick, Communications Director, 608-224-5020

MADISON, Wisconsin –The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) announced today that it is implementing its plan for a coordinated response with the USDA, state health officials and industry partners following USDA confirmation that more than 180,000 chickens at an egg-laying facility in southeast Wisconsin are infected with H5N2 avian influenza virus. Multiple outbreaks of avian influenza have occurred most recently in Minnesota, Missouri, Arkansas, South Dakota and Kansas. While lethal to birds, the strain of virus detected is not known to have caused disease in humans and is not expected to pose a risk to public health or the food supply.

“We are following strict protocols to contain and eliminate the disease,” said Dr. Paul McGraw, Wisconsin’s State Veterinarian.

The facility was immediately quarantined and neighboring properties with poultry will be notified about the situation. The remaining chickens in the affected flock will be depopulated and will not enter the food supply. Following USDA protocols, surveillance and testing procedures are underway at properties near the affected facilities to ensure the virus has not spread.

“Now that we have a confirmation, it’s in a poultry owner’s best interest to take precautions to minimize the effect that this strain of avian influenza will have on their flock,” McGraw says.

McGraw recommends the following six steps for protecting birds from avian influenza:

Keep your distance—Restrict access to your property and keep your birds away from other birds.
Keep it clean—Wash your hands thoroughly before and after working with your birds. Clean and disinfect equipment.
Don’t haul disease home—Buy birds from reputable sources and keep new birds separated for at least 30 days.
Don’t borrow disease—Do not share equipment or supplies with neighbors or other bird owners. If you must borrow, disinfect it first.
Know the warning signs—Early detection can help prevent the spread of the disease. Check your birds frequently. If you find a sick or dead bird, don’t touch it.
Report sick birds—Don’t wait. If your birds are sick or dying, call DATCP at 1-800-572-8981.
As a precaution, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) is reaching out to monitor workers who may have been exposed to the virus. DATCP has also been working with the USDA.

The specimens were tested by a National Animal Health Laboratory Network member lab in Missouri and the APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa confirmed the finding.

More information about avian influenza is available on DATCP’s website at http://datcp.wi.gov/Animals/Animal_Dise ... index.aspx.

http://datcp.wi.gov/news/?ID=1270&AspxA ... eSupport=1

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 12:52 pm 
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Apr 13, 11:14 AM EDT

WISCONSIN RECORDS 1ST OUTBREAK OF DANGEROUS BIRD FLU STRAIN




MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin has confirmed its first case of a dangerous bird flu strain that has struck several other Midwest states.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Monday that it has confirmed the highly pathogenic H5N2 strain in a commercial flock of 200,000 chickens in Jefferson County of southeastern Wisconsin.

The USDA says state officials have quarantined the premises and birds there will be killed to prevent the spread of the disease.

Turkey producers have lost over 1.2 million birds to the disease across the Midwest. This is the first time it has struck a commercial chicken farm in the region.

Authorities say the risk to the public health is now and there's no danger to the food supply. No human cases of the virus have been found in the U.S.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/W/ ... 3-11-14-33

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 13, 2015 1:11 pm 
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US | Mon Apr 13, 2015 12:13pm EDT Related: U.S., HEALTH
U.S. finds first case of H5N2 bird flu in commercial chicken flock
CHICAGO
(Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Monday confirmed the first case of a lethal strain of bird flu in a commercial chicken flock, widening the impact of a virus that has already killed hundreds of thousands of turkeys this year.

The H5N2 flu strain infected a commercial flock of 200,000 chickens in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, between Madison and Milwaukee, according to the USDA.

Since the beginning of the year, the flu, which can kill nearly an entire flock within 48 hours, has been found in commercial turkey operations and backyard poultry flocks stretching from Oregon to Arkansas.

The discoveries have prompted major overseas buyers, including China and Mexico, to restrict imports of U.S. poultry. Producers such as Tyson Foods Inc have strengthened measures to keep the disease off farms.

The infected chickens in Wisconsin were at an egg-laying facility, the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection said.

State officials quarantined the premises and birds there will be culled to prevent the spread of the disease. Chickens from the flock will not enter the food system, officials said.

“We are following strict protocols to contain and eliminate the disease,” said Paul McGraw, Wisconsin’s state veterinarian.

Infections in U.S. poultry have been climbing recently as migratory ducks, which are believed to be spreading the virus, are traveling to northern states after spending the winter farther south, experts say.

Last week, the U.S. government reduced its forecasts for poultry exports by nearly 6 percent from March due partly to the outbreaks, which have triggered wider-than-expected trade restrictions.

No human cases of the bird flu have been detected.

(Reporting by Tom Polansek; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama and Dan Grebler)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/04/ ... NZ20150413

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