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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 3:30 am 
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H5N2 Hits Iowa Again
By SARAH BODEN • 5 HOURS AGO

As many as 5.3 million hens will be euthanized at a commercial laying facility in northwest Iowa as a result of the presence of H5N2. The United States Department of Agriculture confirmed the presence this highly pathogenic strain avian flu Monday.

This year there have already been more than 40 confirmed cases of the virus in commercial flocks across several Midwestern states. H5N2 supposedly is spread by migratory waterfowl, which are generally not harmed by the disease.

Once the virus is detected, standard procedure calls for isolating and then euthanizing the entire flock.

This is Iowa's second case of H5N2. Last week the virus was found in Buena Vista County on a turkey farm of 27,000 birds.

At over 5 million birds, the Osceola County hens comprise the largest flock to be hit by the virus. A turkey farm of 310,000 birds in central Minnesota is the second largest flock to have been infected.

USDA and Iowa Department of Agriculture officials say H5N2 presents a low risk to human health and no food safety concerns. But it can kill an entire flock of birds within days.

http://iowapublicradio.org/post/h5n2-hits-iowa-again

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 6:59 am 
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Millions of hens to be euthanized at Iowa farm with bird flu

By Sarah Kaplan April 21 at 5:26 AM

A flock of turkeys at a Minnesota poultry farm. Nearly 8 million chickens and turkeys have been infected in an outbreak of bird flu in the Midwest, including 5.3 million hens at an Iowa farm. (Bethany Hahn via AP)
An Iowa farm must destroy up to 5.3 million hens after the deadly bird flu virus was found among its flock, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Monday.

This is just the latest discovery of the highly-contagious virus, bringing the total number of infected birds to nearly 8 million since March. Before Monday’s announcement, more than 2.6 million birds had been killed by the disease or by authorities working to prevent it from spreading, the Des Moines Register reported.

The Iowa farm has not been identified by the USDA and it’s not clear how the millions of exposed chickens will be euthanized. The American Veterinary Association recommends use of a water-based foam for “mass depopulation of poultry” in situations where a flock is infected with a rapidly spreading disease.

The Iowa farm has been pinpointed as the largest operation in the country to be affected by the virus, which has been diagnosed at more than 50 sites in about a dozen states, according to the Des Moines Register. Wisconsin, where the virus has been found in three flocks, declared a bird flu emergency the same day the USDA gave the news about Iowa.

Bird flu, or avian influenza, exists in several strains, only some of which affect domestic animals and few of which can infect humans. HPAI H5, the type that is responsible for the current outbreak, is a “highly pathogenic” form, capable of wiping out entire flocks in a matter of days. Though it’s possible that the virus can make the leap to infect humans, such jumps are extremely rare and unlikely to spread to other people, according to the CDC.

Far more worrying is the outbreak’s potential impact on poultry producers. The Iowa farm is one of the biggest in the state and contains about 10 percent of the state’s egg-laying hens. The number of chickens to be euthanized represent about 1 percent of the nation’s egg laying population.

Iowa, meanwhile, is the source of one in every five eggs consumed in the U.S., according to the Associated Press.

“Anybody that has a poultry operation — whether large or small, whether you’ve got hundreds of birds or one bird — this should be a wake-up call,” Randy Olson, executive director of the Iowa Poultry Association, told the Des Moines Register.

Last week, the USDA’s Chief Veterinary Officer John Clifford said that the outbreak could be “devastating” for poultry. Though the disease’s spread should slow once the weather improves, farmers can expect it to return in the fall and last for several years.

But poultry industry consultant Simon Shane cautioned: “Don’t panic.”


“Let’s wait and see,” Shane, who also teaches poultry science and veterinary medicine at North Carolina State University, told the AP. It would take about 20 to 30 million infected hens before consumers started to see prices rise, he added.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morn ... -bird-flu/

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 10:18 am 
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Bird flu found in Iowa; up to 5.3 million chickens to be destroyed
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Chickens in their cages at a farm in Iowa. (Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press)
By RYAN PARKER contact the reporter Bird Flu U.S. Department of Agriculture Flu

Up to 5.3 million chickens are to be euthanized after bird flu is found at an Iowa egg-laying facility
H5N2 avian influenza, or bird flu, has reared its head at a commercial egg-laying facility in northwest Iowa that houses as many as 5.3 million chickens, according to state officials.

All the birds in the Osceola County facility will be euthanized, according to a statement by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. The exact number of birds at the facility is unclear, department spokesman Dustin Vande Hoef said, "but it can house as many as 5.3 million."

State officials said they had quarantined the premises. The birds will be destroyed over the next week, Vande Hoef said.

"Birds from the flock will not enter the food system," according to a statement from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The bird flu came to light when the mortality rate for the facility's chickens began to rise and the facility decided to run tests, Vande Hoef said. He did not identify the facility's operator.

The facility houses nearly 10% of the state’s egg-laying chickens when at capacity, officials said.

There have been no reports of people being infected, according to the state's agriculture department. And officials said they believed the risk to people from the infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry "to be low."

It is the second outbreak of bird flu reported in Iowa this month.


Last week, avian influenza was discovered in a flock of 27,000 turkeys in Buena Vista County, the Des Moines Register reported. Those birds have been euthanized, it said.

On Friday, the bird flu was confirmed in a flock of 23,000 turkeys in Kandiyohi County, Minn., according to the USDA. In addition, 9,000 turkeys had exposure to that flock, the USDA said.

The virus was also confirmed in "33 mixed poultry" in Juneau County, Wis., on Friday, the USDA said.

On Monday, Hormel Foods Corp. said it expected to sell fewer turkeys this year because of bird flu outbreaks in multiple states, including Minnesota, where Hormel is based.

"We are experiencing significant challenges in our turkey supply chain due to the recent HPAI outbreaks in Minnesota and Wisconsin," Jeffrey M. Ettinger, the company's president and chief executive, said in a statement.

However, Hormel said it expected the bird flu outbreak occurrences to decline "as the weather improves."

Staff writer Lauren Raab contributed to this report.

Follow Ryan Parker on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram

http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow ... story.html

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 10:47 am 
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Biggest US Poultry Farm Yet Hit by High-path Flu
21 April 2015
US - Four new outbreaks of H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza have been reported in the US, including one affecting 5.3 million commercial chickens in Iowa, bringing the number of poultry affected since December 2014 to more than eight million.
According to the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), three of the outbreaks were confirmed on 17 April and one on 20 April.
The largest outbreak so far reported was one in a flock of 5.3 million commercial chickens in Osceola county, Iowa, confirmed on 20 April.
Laying hens are affected in this outbreak, according to Des Moines Register.
The disease was also confirmed on two commercial turkey farms in Kandiyohi county, Minnesota – one with 9,000 birds and the other with 23,000.
A backyard flock of 33 mixed poultry in Juneau county, Wisconsin, was also affected late last week.
All these outbreaks were in area affected by the Mississippi flyway for migrating birds.
Overview

The latest cases bring the total number of high-path avian flu outbreaks since December 2014 to 54.
Outbreaks have occurred in poultry in 13 states.
Three of the early outbreaks were caused by the H5N8 sub-type of the virus but in all those since mid-February 2015, the H5N2 variant has been confirmed.
The majority of outbreaks have been in commercial turkeys (40); three have been in commercial chickens and 11 in backyard flocks.
The number of poultry affected by these outbreaks has reached a total of just over eight million. This figure includes over 5.6 million commercial chickens, almost 2.4 million commercial turkeys and over 7,000 backyard poultry.
The disease has also affected five captive wild birds.

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultryne ... hpath-flu/

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 12:29 pm 
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Growing Outbreak: Deadly Bird Flu Hits Iowa Egg Farm
BY MAGGIE FOX

An Iowa farm that has more than 5 million chickens has been hit by H5N2 bird flu, a deadly virus that can wipe out flocks within days.

Iowa state health officials said the outbreak affected a large flock of egg-laying hens — the largest commercial U.S. flock to be hit by the virus since it first showed up in the United States late last year.

"All the birds on the site will be euthanized. The site is also quarantined," said Dustin Vande Hoef, a spokesman for the Iowa Department of Agriculture.

Experts think wild birds flying from Asia are carrying the virus, one of many different types of avian influenza. This strain has never been known to infect human beings.

Ducks, especially, can carry avian influenza viruses without getting sick and they can spread them in their droppings.

"These virus strains can travel in wild birds without those birds appearing sick. People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife," the Iowa Department of Agriculture said in a statement.

"These virus strains can travel in wild birds without those birds appearing sick."

"If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds."

There are dozens of strains of avian influenza but, until late last year, U.S. flocks had been free of the highly pathogenic strains that can kill domestic chickens, turkeys and other poultry in a matter of hours. Now a dozen states have reported infections.

It's bad news for the farms, which must act quickly to slaughter all the birds in an affected flock, destroy the carcasses and disinfect and quarantine the facility. Then, health officials must test domestic and wild birds in the area to make sure the virus is not still around.

While experts say cooked chicken and eggs cannot transmit H5N2, the standard procedure is to destroy all potentially affected birds and eggs.

"There is no reason to avoid any food. All poultry is processed under federal or state inspection," USDA advises in a statement.

So far, it's not a major blow to the U.S. poultry industry. Last year, the U.S. produced about 9.2 billion broiler chickens, about 95 billion eggs and 235 million turkeys, according to USDA.

"There is no reason to avoid any food. All poultry is processed under federal or state inspection."

H5N2 has been reported in Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington and Wisconsin. It's also been seen in Canada.

On Monday Wisconsin declared an emergency and activated the state's National Guard to help disinfect trucks leaving affected facilities there.

While the H5N2 outbreaks are only affecting birds, avian influenza viruses can and do infect people and this adds a level or urgency to controlling any outbreak.

The World Health Organization says more than 780 people in 16 countries are known to have been infected with H5N1 since 2003 and more than 400 of them have died. A second strain called H7N9 has infected 622 people since 2013 and killed 227 of them.

H5N1 is actively infecting people in Egypt now. The virus doesn't spread easily from person to person and almost all of those infected have had close contact with birds. They're often small family flocks and people who get infected have handled the birds, slaughtered them or collected eggs.

Flu is a mutation-prone virus and there are hundreds of strains. Even with precise-sounding names such as H5N1, there can be a large degree of genetic variation. Scientists are watching for mutations and other genetic changes that can make a virus strain more likely to infect people and poultry.

First published April 21st 2015, 11:59 am

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-ne ... rm-n345541

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 4:44 pm 
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Timeline of Events
Below is a summary of events surrounding the spread of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in backyard flocks and commercial poultry in the United States.

2014
December 16 – USDA APHIS confirms H5 Avian Influenza in Whatcom County, Washington. Two strains of the virus were identified: HPAI H5N2 in northern pintail ducks and HPAI H5N8 in captive gyrfalcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds.
December 18 – USDA APHIS confirms the presence of H5N8 in guinea fowl and chickens from a backyard poultry flock in Winston, Oregon. The virus is confirmed to be the same virus that was identified in the Washington state gyrfalcons.
December 19 – HPAI H5N8 is confirmed in a mixed poultry backyard flock in Douglas County, Oregon.
2015
January 3 – The first backyard flock with HPAI H5N2 is identified in Benton County, Washington. Another backyard flock in Benton County is confirmed positive for the same virus later that week.
January 16 – A small mixed poultry backyard flock in Clallam County, Washington is confirmed positive for HPAI H5N2. This same day USDA APHIS confirms a backyard flock in Canyon County, Idaho has also tested positive for H5N2.
January 23 – USDA APHIS announces that the first case of HPAI has been identified in a commercial turkey flock in Stanislaus County, California. The flock was found to have the H5N8 strain of the virus.
January 29 – A backyard pheasant flock in Okanogan County, Washington is confirmed positive for HPAI H5N2.


February 3 – HPAI H5N2 is found in a backyard chicken flock in Okanogan County, Washington.
February 12 – USDA APHIS confirms the second case of HPAI H5N8 in a commercial poultry flock. The virus was identified in a broiler operation in Kings County, California.
February 17 – A mixed poultry backyard flock in Deschutes County, Oregon tests positive for HPAI H5N2


March 4 – The first finding of HPAI H5N2 in the Mississippi flyway is announced. The virus was confirmed in a commercial turkey flock in Pope County, Minnesota.
March 9 – USDA APHIS confirms HPAI H5N2 in a commercial turkey flock in Jasper County, Missouri.
March 10 – A second case of HPAI H5N2 in Missouri is announced. The affected flock is a commercial turkey operation in Moniteau County.
March 11 – HPAI H5N2 is found in a commercial turkey flock in Boone County, Arkansas.
March 13 – The first case of HPAI in the Central flyway is announced. A backyard mixed poultry flock was confirmed positive for HPAI H5N2 in Leavenworth, Kansas.
March 27 – USDA confirms H5N2 HPAI in commercial turkey flock in Lac Qui Parle, Minnesota.
March 28 – A third Minnesota flock is confirmed positive for H5N2 HPAI. The flock consists of commercial turkeys and is located in Stearns County.


April 1 – The first commercial turkey flock in South Dakota is announced. The flock is located in Beadle County.
April 2 – USDA announces H5N2 HPAI in two commercial turkey flocks in Minnesota. The flocks are in Nobles and Stearns Counties.
April 4 – USDA announces H5N2 HPAI in a third Stearns County turkey flock and a flock in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota. These flocks bring the total cases in Minnesota to seven.
April 7 – A second commercial turkey flock in Kandiyohi County is confirmed positive with H5N2. This is the 8th confirmed case in Minnesota.
April 8 – A commercial turkey flock in Meeker County, Minnesota is confirmed positive with H5N2 HPAI.
April 9 – USDA announces a commercial turkey flock confirmed with H5N2 HPAI in Kingsbury County, South Dakota. This is the second finding in South Dakota.
April 10 – USDA announces four commercial turkey flocks that have been identified with H5N2 in Minnesota, bringing the state’s total to 13 flocks. The new cases are located in Cottonwood, Lyon, Watonwan and Stearns Counties. This is the fourth case in Stearns County. USDA also announces HPAI in three more South Dakota commercial turkey flocks; one each in McPherson, McCook and Dickey Counties.
April 11 – Two commercial turkey flocks in Minnesota have been confirmed positive for H5N2 HPAI. These flocks are located in Kandiyohi and Le Sueur Counties. A commercial chicken operation in Wisconsin has also been announced by USDA as having HPAI H5N2. This is the first commercial chicken operation to test positive for this strain of the virus in the Mississippi Flyway.
April 13 – USDA announces two positive H5N2 commercial turkey flocks in Swift and Stearns Counties, Minnesota. The first turkey flock in Iowa is also confirmed positive in Buena Vista, County.
April 14 – USDA confirms HPAI H5N2 in five Minnesota commercial turkey flocks. The flocks are located in Swift, Redwood, Meeker and Kandiyohi Counties. These flocks bring the total in Minnesota to 22 cases.
April 15 – Four commercial turkey flocks in Minnesota have been confirmed positive for H5N2. These flocks are located in Stearns, Kandiyohi, Otter Tail, and Roseau Counties. USDA also announces H5N2 in a commercial turkey flock in Roberts County, South Dakota.
April 16 – USDA announces a second case of HPAI in a Wisconsin commercial turkey flock. This flock is located in Barron County, Wisconsin.
April 17 – A backyard mixed poultry flock in Juneau County Wisconsin and two commercial turkey flocks in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota are confirmed positive with H5N2 HPAI.
April 20 – USDA confirms H5N2 in a commercial chicken operation in Osceola County, Iowa.

https://www.bah.state.mn.us/timeline-of-events

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 5:53 pm 
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Last Modified: Apr 21, 2015 Print
Since December 2014, the United States Department of Agriculture has confirmed several cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 in the Pacific, Central, and Mississippi flyways (or migratory bird paths). The disease has been found in wild birds, as well as in a few backyard and commercial poultry flocks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections to be low. No human cases of these HPAI H5 viruses have been detected in the United States, Canada, or internationally
Update on Avian Influenza Findings
Poultry Findings Confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories

State County Flyway Flock type Species Avian influenza subtype* Confirmation date Flock Size
MN Cottonwood Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr015 30,000
MN Wadena Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 301,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 61,000
SD Spink Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 33,300
IA Osceola Mississippi Commercial Chickens EA/AM-H5N2 20-Apr-15 3,800,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 17-Apr-15 9,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 17-Apr-15 23,000
WI Juneau Mississippi Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 17-Apr-15 33
WI Barron Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 16-Apr-15 126,700
MN Roseau Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 16-Apr-15 26,000
MN Kandiyoh Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 15-Apr-15 152,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 15-Apr-15 67,000
MN Otter Tail Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 15-Apr-15 21,000
SD Roberts Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 15-Apr-15 66,600
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 20,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 30,000
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 25,000
MN Redwood Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 56,000
MN Swift Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 14-Apr-15 154,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 13-Apr-15 76,000
MN Swift Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 13-Apr-15 160,000
IA Buena Vista Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 13-Apr-15 27,000
MN Le Sueur Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 11-Apr-15 21,500
WI Jefferson Mississippi Commercial Chickens EA/AM-H5N2 11-Apr-15 200,000
ND Dickey Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 10-Apr-15 40,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 11-Apr-15 38,000
SD McCook Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 10-Apr-15 53,000
SD McPherson Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 10-Apr-15 46,000
MN Cottonwood Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Apr-15 48,000
MN Lyon Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Apr-15 66,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Apr-15 45,000
MN Watonwan Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Apr-15 30,000
SD Kingsbury Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 8-Apr-15 34,000
MN Meeker Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 7-Apr-15 310,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 7-Apr-15 30,000
MN Kandiyohi Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 4-Apr-15 26,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 4-Apr-15 76,000
MT Judith Basin Central Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 2-Apr-15 40
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 2-Apr-15 71,000
SD Beadle Central Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 1-Apr-15 53,000
MN Nobles Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 2-Apr-15 21,000
MN Stearns Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 28-Mar-15 39,000
MN Lac Qui Parle Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 27-Mar-15 66,000
KS Leavenworth Central Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 13-Mar-15 10
AR Boone Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 11-Mar-15 40,020
MO Moniteau Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 10-Mar-15 13,850
MO Jasper Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 9-Mar-15 15,620
MN Pope Mississippi Commercial Turkeys EA/AM-H5N2 4-Mar-15 26,310
OR Deschutes Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 17-Feb-15 70
CA Kings Pacific Commercial Chicken EA-H5N8 12-Feb-15 112,900
WA Okanogan Pacific Backyard Chicken EA/AM-H5N2 3-Feb-15 40
WA Okanogan Pacific Backyard Pheasant EA/AM-H5N2 29-Jan-15 5830
CA Stanislaus Pacific Commercial Turkeys EA-H5N8 23-Jan-15 134,400
ID Canyon Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 16-Jan-15 30
WA Clallam Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 16-Jan-15 110
WA Benton Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 9-Jan-15 590
WA Benton Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA/AM-H5N2 3-Jan-15 140
OR Douglas Pacific Backyard Mixed poultry EA -H5N8 19-Dec-14 130
Total 6,928,223
* References to EA and AM under avian influenza subtype indicate Eurasian and American strains of the virus.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/ap ... fic_flyway

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 6:17 pm 
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Map update

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2015 10:28 pm 
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Officials hope largest U.S. outbreak is Iowa's last
and Christopher Doering 8:50 p.m. CDT April 21, 2015

State and federal agriculture leaders worked Tuesday to calm concerns about food safety in the wake of an outbreak of avian influenza at a north Iowa egg-laying facility — the largest such outbreak in the nation.

But farm officials said they're unable to say whether it's the last bird flu case the state will see.

Scientists and government officials believe the virus is being spread through migratory birds in the Mississippi flyway, where the strain previously has been identified. The birds are believed to transmit the illness through their droppings.

"We believe it's not going farm to farm," said Bill Northey, Iowa's secretary of agriculture. "We do not believe it's spreading in a way that's likely to create other problems on other farms.

"This does not mean that we might not see a significant number of new cases. And we might just be talking about the last one in Iowa. I just don't know. We have to let that play out," said Northey, who held a news conference Tuesday with John Clifford, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's chief veterinary officer, and Randy Olson, executive director of the Iowa Poultry Association.

On Tuesday, officials said they're working with the north Iowa egg producer to destroy 3.8 million laying hens. "It's nearly 4 million birds, so it's not going to happen immediately," Northey said. "There are several decisions that still need to be made about the process."

The number of hens is fewer than the 5.3 million birds originally reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That's the facility's capacity, officials said.

Sonstegard Foods Co., based in Sioux Falls, S.D., confirmed Tuesday that avian influenza was discovered at Sunrise Farms, an egg-laying operation affiliated with the company. Sonstegard said Sunrise Farms, near Harris, in northwest Iowa, "maintains strict biosecurity covering all aspects of live production."

"We went to great lengths to prevent our birds from contracting" avian influenza, Sonstegard said. "Despite best efforts, we now confirm many of our birds are testing positive."

Second case in Iowa; many states affected

The Sunrise Farms outbreak is the second case of H5N2 avian influenza discovered in Iowa. Last week, a flock of 27,000 turkeys in Buena Vista County tested positive. Those birds were euthanized to contain the spread.

Since the beginning of the year, the disease has been discovered at more than 50 sites across the country, including in Arkansas, Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Besides the Iowa outbreak, four new cases were reported this week, three in Minnesota and one in South Dakota.

Clifford said Tuesday the national outbreak is beginning to strain the federal agency's resources, and the agency is asking some retired veterinarians for help.

The infected facility and poultry facilities within 10 kilometers are quarantined, and officials must test commercial and backyard poultry in the area for the disease to determine that they're free of the virus.

Northey said the state may need assistance as well if the outbreaks grow. "We're able to manage this situation, but if we had 10 more next week, we'd need additional help," he said.

Northey said the federal government will help the north Iowa producer with the loss of birds and some cleanup costs. Payments don't cover lost income. "It's going to be a significant loss for the farmer at the end of the day," he said.

Part of the investigation includes trying to determine how an operation is infected, said USDA's Clifford. "We try to determine if there was a break in the biosecurity," possibly through the feed, personnel or other avenues, he said.

The virus could be carried into a facility on a shoe or through clothing.

"No one wants to make a mistake, but from time to time they do make one," said John Glisson, a vice president of research with the U.S. Poultry & Egg Association. "Farmers are taking care of a lot of animals, a lot of equipment. A lot of people are involved. They probably don't always do it correctly, but they are trying very, very hard because they have so much at stake."

"I suspect that we might find different pathways at different facilities," Clifford said. And officials may never fully determine how the virus entered a facility, he said.

Officials: Virus poses no danger to humans

Despite its virulent nature, officials say, the virus doesn't pose a danger to humans or to the food supply.

Clifford said the virus could affect humans if it mutates, something that is not common in poultry viruses. "This virus has shown to be a very low-impact virus for people," he said.

No birds or eggs are moved from infected farms, said Northey and Clifford. Birds with avian influenza "aren't allowed into the food supply," he said. "These birds will not go to slaughter."

As an added precaution, pasteurization of eggs also kills the virus, Northey said.

"It's devastating to the farmer, but as of today, eggs are still rolling out of most of our facilities," he said. "These are good healthy eggs. Consumers need to feel very comfortable eating Iowa eggs, eating Iowa turkeys and Iowa chicken meat as well."

Altogether, 6.9 million birds nationally have tested positively for bird flu across the nation.

Northey said it's unclear how the disease will affect consumer and producer prices for eggs, turkeys and other poultry products.

Some export markets have banned some U.S. poultry products, restricting demand, but some supplies also have been cut. "It depends on how this plays out," Northey said. "Right now, it doesn't appear like the loss of supply of turkey or eggs is significant enough to impact prices."

Even though the egg-laying facility is large, it remains a small fraction of the state's 60 million laying hens and 3.5 billion eggs produced annually, said Olson, executive director of the Iowa Poultry Association.

"We expect other producers will step up to the plate to meet the demand," Olson said.

Destroying 3.8 million hens will be a massive undertaking, Northey said.

The two most common processes used to kill the birds are with carbon dioxide or application of a foam similar to what is used to suppress a fire.

The birds are then removed from the facility and used as composting, buried locally or sent to a nearby landfill in a way that prevents predators from accessing the depopulated birds. The USDA typically contracts with an outside company to kill and dispose of the birds.

"It's a large volume of birds," Clifford said. "It's a huge undertaking, and it will cost a significant amount of dollars to do."

http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/ ... /26155285/?

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2015 11:30 am 
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Highly pathogenic avian influenza,
United States of America

Information received on 24/04/2015 from Dr John Clifford, Deputy Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, United States of America
Summary
Report type Follow-up report No. 13
Date of start of the event 10/12/2014
Date of confirmation of the event 15/12/2014
Report date 24/04/2015
Date submitted to OIE 24/04/2015
Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence 2004
Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Serotype H5N2
Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to a defined zone within the country
Related reports Immediate notification (16/12/2014)
Follow-up report No. 1 (07/01/2015)
Follow-up report No. 2 (13/01/2015)
Follow-up report No. 3 (22/01/2015)
Follow-up report No. 4 (03/02/2015)
Follow-up report No. 5 (17/02/2015)
Follow-up report No. 6 (24/02/2015)
Follow-up report No. 7 (06/03/2015)
Follow-up report No. 8 (12/03/2015)
Follow-up report No. 9 (20/03/2015)
Follow-up report No. 10 (31/03/2015)
Follow-up report No. 11 (08/04/2015)
Follow-up report No. 12 (15/04/2015)
Follow-up report No. 13 (24/04/2015)
New outbreaks (24)
Outbreak 1 (78) Juneau County, Juneau, WISCONSIN
Date of start of the outbreak 08/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Backyard
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 33 33
Affected population The affected premises was a small backyard mixed flock of ducks and chickens that were allowed access to the outdoors.
Outbreak 2 (59) Swift County, Swift, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 160000 160000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 3 (60) Stearns County 5, Stearns, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 76000 76000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 4 (58) Le Sueur County, Le Sueur, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 21500 21500
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 5 (65) Meeker County 3, Meeker, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 20000 20000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 6 (56) St. Charles County, St. Charles, MISSOURI
Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Not applicable
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Snow Goose:Anser caerulescens(Anatidae)
Affected population Wild bird surveillance.
Outbreak 7 (63) Meeker County 2, Meeker, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 11/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 25000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 8 (61) Swift County 2, Swift, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 11/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 154000 154000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 9 (62) Redwood County, Redwood, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 11/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 56000 56000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 10 (75) Buena Vista County, Buena Vistaa, IOWA
Date of start of the outbreak 12/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 27000 27000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 11 (76) Roberts County, Roberts, SOUTH DAKOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 12/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 69000 69000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 12 (64) Kandiyohi County 4, Kandiyohi, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 12/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 30000 30000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 13 (66) Otter Tail County, Otter Tail, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 13/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 21000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 14 (67) Stearns County 6, Stearns, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 13/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 67000 67000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 15 (69) Roseau County, Roseau, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 13/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 26000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 16 (68) Kandiyohi County 5, Kandiyohi, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 13/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 152000 152000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 17 (57) Barron County, Barron, WISCONSIN
Date of start of the outbreak 14/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 126650 126650
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 18 (70) Kandiyohi County 6, Kandiyohi, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 15/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 23000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 19 (74) Cottonwood County 2, Cottonwood, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 16/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 30000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 20 (79) Osceola County, Osceolla, IOWA
Date of start of the outbreak 16/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 4034000
Affected population A commercial chicken table egg layer flock.
Outbreak 21 (77) Spink County, Spink, SOUTH DAKOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 16/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 35100 35100
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 22 (71) Kandiyohi County 8, Kandiyohi, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 16/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 9000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 23 (73) Wadena County, Wadena, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 16/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 301000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Outbreak 24 (72) Kandiyohi County 9, Kandiyohi, MINNESOTA
Date of start of the outbreak 17/04/2015
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 61000
Affected population A commercial turkey flock.
Summary of outbreaks Total outbreaks: 24
Total animals affected
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 5524283 ** 994283
Snow Goose:Anser caerulescens(Anatidae) **
Outbreak statistics
Species Apparent morbidity rate Apparent mortality rate Apparent case fatality rate Proportion susceptible animals lost*
Birds ** ** ** **
Snow Goose:Anser caerulescens(Anatidae) ** ** ** **
*Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
**Not calculated because of missing information
Epidemiology
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
Contact with wild species
Epidemiological comments The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), in conjunction with State Departments of Agriculture and Wildlife, are continuing to conduct a comprehensive epidemiological investigation and enhanced surveillance (including wild bird surveillance of hunter harvested birds) in response to the HPAI H5N8 and H5N2 wild bird related events. Novel avian influenza virus of Eurasian origin (EA-H5N8 clade 2.3.4.4) spread rapidly along wild bird migratory pathways during 2014. Introduction of this EA-H5N8 virus into the Pacific Flyway sometime during 2014 has allowed mixing with North American (AM) lineage viruses and generated new combinations with genes from both EA and AM origin (or “reassortant” viruses) such as this EA/AM H5N2-reassortant detected in the US. In addition, overlap of the Pacific, Central, and Mississippi Americas flyways has resulted in movement of the virus to the central part of the country. The EA-H5 clade 2.3.4.4 viruses are highly pathogenic for poultry.
Control measures
Measures applied
Stamping out
Quarantine
Movement control inside the country
Zoning
Disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)
Vaccination prohibited
No treatment of affected animals
Measures to be applied
No other measures
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory name and type Species Test Test date Result
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 11/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 12/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 13/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 14/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 16/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 17/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 20/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 11/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 12/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 13/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 14/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 16/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 17/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 20/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Snow Goose real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 10/04/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Snow Goose virus sequencing 10/04/2015 Positive
Future Reporting
The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.
Map of outbreak locations

http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid ... rtid=17593

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