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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 6:45 pm 
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Second Case of Avian Flu Detected in NW Iowa; 5.3 Million Chickens To Be Killed
ABC9 News

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04/20/2015 04:16 PM04/20/2015 05:12 PM

DES MOINES, IA (ABC9)- Cases of Avian Influenza have been found at a second Northwest Iowa poultry farm. The virus was detected at a commercial egg laying facility in Osceola County. The facility houses about 5.3 million hens, all of which will have to be euthanized to prevent the spread of the disease.

According to the CDC, the H5N2 strain of Avian Influenza detected at the facility poses a low risk to people. No human infections with the virus have ever been detected.

The farm has been quarantined as a result of the discovery and officials are monitoring the region for infected birds. Avian Influenza can often travel in wild birds without the birds appearing sick.

Last week Iowa had its first case of Avian Flu confirmed at a turkey farm in Buena Vista county. That facility housed 27,000 birds. Outbreaks have also been confirmed at numerous poultry farms in Iowa and Minnesota.

You can find more information on the Avian Flu, as well as some measures you can take to protect your flock here.

http://www.siouxlandmatters.com/story/d ... 3Jgm1zD3pQ

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 6:49 pm 
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Second Iowa bird flu outbreak strikes egg facility
Donnelle Eller, deller@dmreg.com 5:16 p.m. CDT April 20, 2015
Image
(Photo: The Register file photo)

Iowa has discovered a second outbreak of avian influenza, this time at a commercial chicken laying facility in Osceola County in northwest Iowa, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Monday.

The facility has 5.3 million hens. All the birds in the flock will be euthanized to prevent the spread of the disease, officials said.

Last week, H5N2 avian influenza was discovered in a flock of 27,000 turkeys in Buena Vista County. Those birds also were euthanized. The disease is capable of killing an entire flock within 48 hours.Last week, H5N2 avian influenza was discovered in a flock of 27,000 turkeys in Buena Vista County. Those birds also were euthanized. The disease is capable of killing an entire flock within 48 hours.

Scientists and government officials believe the virus is being spread through migratory birds in the Mississippi flyway, where the strain previously has been identified. The birds are believed to transmit the illness through their droppings.

The poultry industry has increased biosecurity efforts. Last week, officials said they were concerned the poultry-killing disease would make its way into the state's commercial egg-laying industry, which is the largest in the nation.

It's a $2 billion industry in Iowa, which has about 50 million hens that lay nearly one in every five eggs consumed in the country.

Federal and state health officials consider the risk to people to be low from these infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry. No human infections with the virus have ever been detected.

The northwest Iowa flock experienced increased mortality and samples were sent to the South Dakota State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for preliminary testing, the USDA said. The National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames confirmed the findings.

The facility and poultry facilities within 10 kilometers around it have been quarantined. State officials will test commercial and backyard poultry in the area for the disease to determine that they're free of the virus.

The lethal virus strain has been found in several states, including Arkansas, Wisconsin, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. More than 1 million birds have been killed by the disease or by authorities working to prevent it from spreading.

The Iowa Department of Agriculture and the Iowa Department of Public Health are working directly with poultry workers at the affected facility to ensure proper precautions are being taken, USDA said.

http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/ ... /26094811/

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 6:51 pm 
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Bird Flu Hits Iowa Farm With 5.3 Million Chickens
Outbreak is biggest poultry operation to be affected by outbreak that began late last year
By JACOB BUNGE
Updated April 20, 2015 6:28 p.m. ET

An Iowa chicken flock numbering about 5.3 million birds has been hit with avian influenza, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Monday, marking the biggest poultry operation to be affected by a virus outbreak that began late last year.

The affected flock, based in Iowa’s Osceola County, brings the total number of chickens and turkeys impacted by avian influenza to nearly 8 million birds.

Authorities didn’t immediately name the farm that owns the affected flock. The Iowa Poultry Association said the farm supplies eggs for consumption and processing, and that all eggs from the farm have been gathered and quarantined.

Poultry-industry and animal-health officials are struggling to understand how the virus, believed to be carried by wild ducks and geese, is making its way into tightly controlled poultry barns. A top theory is that wild birds have spread the virus through their droppings, which poultry workers unknowingly track into farms.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker on Monday declared a state of emergency to address the virus, authorizing the state’s National Guard to help contain outbreaks and clean up after affected flocks have been exterminated.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/bird-flu-hi ... 1429565561

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:14 pm 
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U.S. Bird Flu Outbreak Expands to 5.3 Million Hens in Iowa

by Megan Durisin
5:05 PM EDT
April 20, 2015

Iowa reported that a flock of 5.3 million chickens at an egg-laying facility in Osceola County has bird flu, the biggest outbreak of the virus reported in the U.S.
Turmoil in the poultry industry escalated as Scott Walker, the governor of Wisconsin, Iowa’s northern neighbor, authorized the state’s National Guard to help agriculture authorities respond to the flu in three counties. Hormel Foods Corp., the owner of Jennie-O turkeys, said Monday that annual profit may be eroded because the virus is hampering production.
Iowa’s agriculture agency said in an e-mail that the flock had 5.3 million hens and is the second confirmed case in the state. The premises detected with the virus have been quarantined, and birds on the property were “depopulated” to stop the flu’s spread, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
“The Center for Disease Control and Iowa Department of Public Health considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low,” Iowa’s agriculture agency said in a statement. The owner of the egg facility wasn’t disclosed.
Avian flu has been found primarily in commercial turkey flocks, particularly in Minnesota, the largest U.S. producer.
The virus was first confirmed in a commercial turkey flock in the central U.S. last month after an outbreak began in wild birds and backyard flocks in the western U.S. in late 2014.
Waterfowl Route
The disease has been found in some states that fall along a Mississippi River migratory route for waterfowl. China has halted all U.S. poultry imports since January, and other nations have imposed bans. Birds in flocks detected with the virus don’t enter the food system, according to the USDA.
“We must act quickly and efficiently to contain the outbreak and protect domestic poultry,” Wisconsin’s Walker said in a statement on his website. The state veterinarian requested as many as 14 guard personnel on a rotating schedule for immediate assistance.
The USDA has forecast that national egg production will rise 0.9 percent this year to 8.41 billion dozen, and prices will average $1.30 to $1.36 a dozen, down from $1.423 last year.
The U.S. Poultry & Egg Export Council and the American Egg Board couldn’t be reached for comment after regular business hours.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/ ... h-bird-flu?

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:16 pm 
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Hormel says bird flu outbreak will reduce turkey sales; about 2.3M turkeys affected nationwide
Apr 20, 2015 The Associated Press 0
NEW YORK, N.Y. – Hormel says it will sell less turkey this year because of a spreading bird flu outbreak.

So far the virus has been found at farms housing 2.3 million turkeys, all of which have died of the disease, or have been killed or soon will be in order to stem the spread of avian flu. Most of the birds were in Minnesota, which is the largest turkey-producing state in the U.S.

Big commercial farms have been hit hard, and Hormel said Monday it is experiencing significant turkey supply-chain problems. It expects outbreaks to decrease as the weather improves.

Both Hormel and its Jennie-O Turkey Store division are based in Minnesota.

Hormel Foods Corp., citing its upcoming second-quarter report, said Monday that it can’t comment on how turkey prices or the Thanksgiving turkey season will be affected. It is scheduled to report its earnings May 20 and said it will provide more details about its turkey business then.

According to a Jennie-O Turkey Store website, the highly contagious H5N2 strain of avian flu has been confirmed at 19 farms that are either independent contract growers for Jennie-O or are company-owned. All but one of those are in Minnesota.

The virus has been found in turkey flocks in six states. Scientists believe domestic poultry are getting the virus from wild migratory waterfowl, although security measures at farms are supposed to minimize the chances that will happen. Once the virus is confirmed at a particular farm, all of the turkeys at that farm are killed and the location is closed for a full cleaning.

Hormel says all of its flocks are tested for the virus.

About 46 million turkeys are raised in Minnesota annually. It’s not clear why that state has been particularly hard-hit by the disease. About 235 million turkeys were produced in the U.S. last year.

On Monday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said the virus was also found at an Iowa farm holding 5.3 million hens, or almost 10 per cent of the state’s egg-laying chickens.

http://www.canadianbusiness.com/busines ... ationwide/?

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:28 pm 
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Bird Flu Is Back In The U.S., And Millions Of Chickens Are Affected
An outbreak of the virus has affected 5.3 million chickens at an Iowa farm, and officials in Wisconsin have called a state of emergency. Humans are not at risk from the disease.

posted on April 20, 2015, at 7:01 p.m.

Claudia Koerner
BuzzFeed News Reporter

Bethany Hahn / AP
The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Monday confirmed 5.3 million birds in Iowa were affected by an avian influenza outbreak.
The latest cases came after about 2 million birds were affected by an outbreak in Minnesota, according to local officials. In Wisconsin, where tens of thousands birds were also exposed to the virus, the governor called a state of emergency to assist farmers in their response. Thousands of birds were also affected by an outbreak in South Dakota.
Birds in the affected flocks will be euthanized to keep the disease from becoming established in U.S. poultry populations, according to the USDA. Equipment and facilities will also be disinfected, after which officials will test to confirm the virus has been eliminated.
No cases of the disease have been found in people, and health officials said the risk of humans transmission is very low.
“CDC considers the risk to people from these HPAI H5 infections in wild birds, backyard flocks, and commercial poultry, to be low,” the USDA said in an announcement.
The birds in the affected populations will not become part of the food stream, the USDA added.

http://www.buzzfeed.com/claudiakoerner/ ... .prx6qkxdb

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:36 pm 
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Millions of Hens in Iowa to Be Destroyed as Bird Flu Spreads
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
APRIL 20, 2015

DES MOINES — Up to 5.3 million hens at an Iowa farm will have to be destroyed after the highly infectious and deadly bird flu virus was confirmed there, the Agriculture Department said Monday.

Iowa is home to roughly 59 million hens that lay nearly one in every five eggs consumed in the country. The farm, in northwest Osceola County, the first chicken farm in Iowa to be affected, has nearly 10 percent of the state’s egg-laying hens.

Officials in Iowa said there was no danger to food safety. Egg industry marketing experts cautioned that it was too early to predict the effect on consumers, but they said the slaughter was unlikely to cause an immediate increase in prices or a shortage of birds because the number of chickens affected was still little more than 1 percent of the nation’s egg layers.

“Don’t panic,” said Simon Shane, a poultry industry consultant and adjunct professor of poultry science and veterinary medicine at North Carolina State University. “Let’s wait and see.”

If the disease keeps spreading and 20 million to 30 million hens are infected, consumers could start seeing prices rise, Mr. Shane said.

Several Midwestern states have been affected by the outbreaks, costing turkey and chicken producers nearly 7.8 million birds since March.

The virus was first detected in Minnesota, the country’s top turkey-producing state, in early March. The H5N2 virus has since shown up on commercial farms in Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. On Monday, the virus was confirmed in another turkey farm in Minnesota and a backyard flock of mixed birds in Wisconsin.

Wisconsin declared a state of emergency on Monday over the outbreak, and Governor Scott Walker authorized the state’s National Guard to help contain the disease.

Also Monday, Hormel Foods said it expected to sell fewer turkeys this year because of the disease’s spread. Avian flu has hit 17 flocks owned or processed by the company, including flocks being raised by contractors or independent farmers.

Company officials wouldn’t comment on how turkey prices or the Thanksgiving turkey season would be affected because of its upcoming second-quarter report.

The chickens at the farm in Osceola County were in more than 20 houses, said Dustin Vande Hoef, a spokesman for Iowa Agriculture Secretary Bill Northey. After the farm had a high number of chicken deaths, it sent samples to a government lab at Iowa State University for confirmation.

“It’s a huge challenge for this producer and highlights the importance of biosecurity and other producers trying to take steps to limit the spread of this disease,” Mr. Vande Hoef said.

The Center for Disease Control and the Iowa Department of Public Health considers the risk to people from infections in wild birds, backyard flocks and commercial poultry, to be low. No human infections with the virus have ever been detected.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/21/busin ... reads.html?

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:41 pm 
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Iowa facility to euthanize 5.3M chickens after bird flu outbreak
By Danielle Haynes Follow @DanielleHaynes1 Contact the Author | April 20, 2015 at 7:17 PM
Image
White hens at a laying facility. File photo by format35/Shutterstock
SIBLEY, Iowa, April 20 (UPI) -- A commercial chicken facility in Iowa is euthanizing 5.3 million hens after bird flu was detected.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service laboratories in Ames, Iowa, conducted testing on the animals after the Osceola County facility experienced an uptick in deaths among its flock.

The chickens tested positive for H5N2 avian influenza, which is considered high pathogenic in birds.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control says it is rare for humans to contract the class of influenza in which H5N2 falls. Though no human infections of the virus has ever been recorded, the recent uptick in U.S. cases in chickens and turkeys could lead to a human infection, the CDC says.

All hens at the Iowa facility were quarantined and were scheduled to be euthanized, the Iowa Department of Agriculture said.

"People should avoid contact with sick/dead poultry or wildlife," the department said. "If contact occurs, wash your hands with soap and water and change clothing before having any contact with healthy domestic poultry and birds."

In March, the same strain of avian flu was responsible for killing 15,000 turkeys in Minnesota and sickened 40,000 turkeys in Arkansas.

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2015/04/ ... =sec&or=tn

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:51 pm 
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H5N2 strikes again in Iowa, Minnesota
Filed Under: Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)
Robert Roos | News Editor | CIDRAP News | Apr 20, 2015

The H5N2 avian influenza virus has again widened its footprint, invading a large chicken farm in Iowa—the second outbreak in that state—and affecting two more turkey farms in Minnesota, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported today.

In addition, a highly pathogenic H5 virus has hit a chicken farm in Ontario near where H5N2 struck a turkey farm earlier this month, Canadian authorities reported over the weekend. They have not yet specified the virus subtype, but H5N2 seems likely.

Iowa, Minnesota outbreaks
In Iowa, the virus invaded a commercial farm with 5.3 million chickens in the far northwestern county of Osceola, the Iowa Department of Agriculture (IDA) reported. That figure makes the farm the largest one affected by H5N2 so far.

Osceola borders Nobles County, Minnesota, which had a turkey farm outbreak earlier this month, and lies northwest of Buena Vista County, where a farm with 27,000 turkeys was reported hit by the virus on Apr 14, in Iowa's first H5N2 outbreak.

Increased deaths in the Osceola County flock prompted authorities to send samples to the South Dakota State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for preliminary testing, the IDA said. The USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa, confirmed the findings.

In Minnesota, a farm with 23,000 turkeys in Kandiyohi County—the state's top turkey-growing county—was hit by the virus, the Minnesota Board of Animal Health (MBAH) reported today. In addition, authorities decided to euthanize all 9,000 turkeys on another farm because of their "exposure" to those on the infected farm, the agency said on its online list of outbreaks.

MBAH spokeswoman Bethany Hahn said the smaller flock was destroyed because of its relationship to the larger one, but said she had no further details on the connection. The two farms are the county's sixth and seventh to be victimized by H5N2.

With the two latest additions, the number of affected farms in Minnesota has increased to 28, in 14 counties, with more than 1.7 million birds lost. Minnesota is the nation's leading turkey-producing state, growing about 46 million birds annually.

Ontario outbreak
North of the border, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) on Apr 18 reported an H5 avian flu outbreak on a broiler breeder chicken farm in southern Ontario's Oxford County, the same area where an H5N2 outbreak on a turkey farm was reported on Apr 6.

The CFIA did not list the number of birds on the farm, but an Apr 19 CTV News report said 27,000 chickens would be euthanized to stop the virus. The story said the CFIA knew of no connections between the two farms but suspected that migratory waterfowl spread the virus.

The CFIA said sudden deaths in the flock over several days led to testing for avian flu, with initial tests conducted at the University of Guelph on Apr 7. Further testing by the CFIA is under way to confirm the virus's pathogenicity and precise subtype, the agency said.

In other developments, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has authorized the Wisconsin National Guard to help respond to H5N2 outbreaks in his state, in response to a request from the state veterinarian, Walker's office announced today.

Walker's order allows the Guard to help contain the outbreak and assist with site clean-up, the statement said. The state veterinarian requested up to 14 Guard personnel be made available on a rotating schedule for immediate assistance. Officials said the help is needed "because federal resources are thin, due to avian influenza virus outbreaks in other states, particularly in the Midwest."

Wisconsin has had three H5N2 outbreaks, involving a turkey farm in Barron County, a backyard flock of 40 birds in Juneau County, and a chicken farm in Jefferson County.

H5N1 spreads in Burkina Faso
In overseas developments, Burkina Faso's animal health ministry today reported seven more H5N1 avian flu outbreaks, affecting farms and backyard poultry in various parts of the country. The new outbreaks come in the wake of four other H5N1 detections reported on Apr 1, which were the country's first since 2006.

The new outbreaks struck birds in four different provinces: Kadiogo (3), Houet (2), Poni, and Boulkiemde. The provinces are in the western and central parts of Burkina Faso. Two of the four outbreaks reported earlier this month were also in Kadiogo.

Four of the outbreaks hit poultry farms that housed chickens, while three involved backyard flocks that included chickens, Guinea fowl, pigeons, and turkeys.

All told, the virus killed 11,308 of 49,718 susceptible birds, and 4,122 have so far been culled to control its spread.

The source of the virus so far isn't known. Other control steps include disinfecting the premises, limiting poultry movement, and strengthening epidemiologic surveillance.

News writer Lisa Schnirring contributed to this article.

See also:

Apr 20 Iowa Department of Agriculture statement

MBAH list of Minnesota outbreaks

USDA's national list of recent avian flu outbreaks

Apr 18 CFIA statement

Apr 19 CTV News story

Apr 20 Wisconsin statement on National Guard role

Apr 20 OIE report on Burkina Faso outbreaks

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspect ... -minnesota

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:10 pm 
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5.3 million chickens in Iowa to be destroyed
UPDATED 6:04 PM CDT Apr 20, 2015
Image

DES MOINES, Iowa —The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the bird flu virus has been found at a farm holding nearly 10 percent of Iowa's egg-laying chickens.

The confirmation of the highly infectious and deadly H5N2 virus means up to 5.3 million hens must be destroyed at the farm in northwest Iowa's Osceola County.

Iowa is home to roughly 59 million hens that lay nearly one in every five eggs consumed in the country.

It's the first chicken farm in Iowa to be affected by the virus, which was confirmed at a turkey farm in the state last week.

Several Midwestern states have been affected by the outbreaks, costing poultry producers nearly 7.8 million birds since March.

The latest farm experienced a high number of chicken deaths and sent samples to labs.

Hormel said Monday that it will sell less turkey this year because of a spreading bird flu outbreak.

Farmers have been forced to kill more than 2.4 million turkeys since March. Most of the birds were in Minnesota, where Hormel is based. The company says it is experiencing significant supply chain problems, but expects outbreaks to decrease as the weather gets better.

Hormel Foods Corp. said Monday that it can't comment on how turkey prices or the Thanksgiving turkey season will be affected because of its upcoming second-quarter report.

According to a Jennie-O Turkey store website, the highly contagious H5N2 strain of avian flu has hit 17 flocks owned or processed by the company, including flocks being raised by contractors or independent farmers.

It's been found in turkey flocks in six states.

http://www.kcci.com/news/53-million-chi ... d/32471672

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