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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 4:02 pm 
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@MelanieNagyCTV: Officials say the BC couple were traveling both with a guided tour and on their own.Officials not saying where they traveled at this time.

@MelanieNagyCTV: Officials also say that the two BC residents were not in a particularly high risk area in China.Officials say risk of spread here in BC low.

@ctv_mariaw: Metro Vancouver couple went on guided tour for part of their trip to China, travelled on their own the rest of the time. @CTVVancouver

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 4:04 pm 
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North America's first human case of H7N9 virus confirmed in B.C.
New bird flu strain passes quickly to humans

Published Monday, January 26, 2015 2:15PM EST
Last Updated Monday, January 26, 2015 2:31PM EST

North America's first human case of the H7N9 virus, a new type of avian influenza, has been confirmed in British Columbia, Health Minister Rona Ambrose announced Monday.
The individual infected with the virus had recently returned from China and was not exhibiting symptoms during travel, Ambrose said.
The person did not require hospitalization and is now recovering while in self-isolation, she said.
The person was travelling with a family member who was also sick with a flu-like illness upon returning to Canada. It’s believed that the second traveller had also contracted the H7N9 virus, but that has not been confirmed. That person also did not require hospitalization and is now recovering.
Ambrose said the risk to the public is very low since evidence shows that H7N9 does not transmit easily from person to person. B.C. health officials stressed Monday that H7N9 is different from H5N1, another strain of the avian flu that has killed nearly 400 people since 2003, mostly in Asia.
H7N9 has never before been seen in North America, either in birds or humans.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/health/nor ... 7904ca0d24

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 4:47 pm 
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Canada resident tests positive for H7N9 avian flu virus
BY JULIE GORDON
VANCOUVER Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:29pm EST

(Reuters) - A resident of the Canadian province of British Columbia has tested positive for the H7N9 avian flu virus in the first documented case of the infection in a human in North America, the federal government said on Monday.

The person had returned to Canada from China and is recovering from the illness in self-isolation, the Public Health Agency of Canada said in a statement.

"I want to emphasize that the risk to Canadians is very low because there is no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission of H7N9," Gregory Taylor, Canada's Chief Public Health Officer, said at a news conference in Ottawa.

Taylor said the individual returned to Canada on Jan. 12 after visiting numerous locations in China and began to feel ill two days later on Jan. 14.

"All evidence is indicating that it is likely the individual was infected following exposure in China," he said. "We don’t know at this time how the individual contracted the virus."

The H7N9 virus passes between birds, but experts say there is not enough evidence to prove it passes between humans. Most cases report contact with poultry, usually in live poultry markets, the Canadian health agency said.

The virus first infected three people in China in March 2013. In 2014, it infected 453 people, killing 175 of them, according to the World Health Organization.

Two people reportedly died of the H7N9 virus in China's coastal Fujian province earlier this month, and recent human cases have been reported in the Jiangxi and Zhejiang provinces, and Shanghai.

The H7N9 virus has not been detected in birds in Canada.

(With additional reporting by David Ljunggren in Ottawa; Editing by Grant McCool and Andre Grenon)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/01/ ... A120150126

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 5:02 pm 
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Government of Canada and British Columbia confirm case of H7N9 avian influenza in Canada
B.C. case is the first documented case of H7N9 in humans in Canada
The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health, Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. Gregory Taylor, Terry Lake, British Columbia’s Minister of Health and Dr. Bonnie Henry, British Columbia’s Deputy Provincial Health Officer today confirmed that an individual in B.C. has tested positive for the H7N9 avian influenza strain. The individual recently returned to Canada from China. This is the first documented case of H7N9 infection in a human in North America.

The risk to Canadians of getting sick with H7N9 is very low as evidence suggests that it does not transmit easily from person-to-person.

The individual is a resident of British Columbia and was not symptomatic during travel and only became sick after arrival in Canada. The individual did not require hospitalization and is currently recovering from their illness, in self-isolation.

All close contacts of the individual have been identified and their health is being monitored by provincial public health authorities. The Canadian healthcare system has strong procedures and controls in place to respond to and control the spread of infectious diseases and protect healthcare workers.

The diagnosis of H7N9 was confirmed by both B.C.'s provincial laboratory and the Agency’s National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.

The Agency works closely with its national and international partners, including the WHO, to track all types of flu activity in Canada and around the world.

Though the individual was not symptomatic, and H7N9 does not transmit easily from person-to-person, the Agency is committed to ensuring Canadians have all the information they need, as a result, we are sharing the flight number. The individual was on Air Canada flight 8.

Quick Facts

H7N9 is a type of avian influenza virus that has been seen in people in China since 2013. Almost all of the cases reported contact with poultry, usually in live poultry markets.
To date, the H7N9 strain has not been detected in birds in Canada.
The Agency’s Travel Health Notices on www.travel.gc.ca provide information on how to protect yourself from avian influenza while abroad.
There is no risk of catching the virus by eating well-cooked poultry. Canada does not import raw poultry or raw poultry products from China.
Canadians can help protect themselves and their loved ones from the flu in general by:
Getting an annual influenza shot
Washing hands frequently;
Covering coughs and sneezes;
Keeping common surfaces clean; and
Staying home when sick.
The Agency has notified China, the World Health Organization and other international partners about the case, in keeping with our commitment under the International Health Regulations.
Quotes

“Today we are confirming the first case of H7N9 in humans in North America. We continue to work with our national and international partners to track infectious disease outbreaks in Canada and around the world to ensure the health and safety of Canadians. Public Health Agency of Canada continues to advise and emphasize that H7N9 does not spread easily from person to person and the risk remains very low.”

Honourable Rona Ambrose
Minister of Health

"The Agency is in close contact with the provincial public health authority to monitor the situation in B.C. and is committed to providing Canadians with accurate and up-to-date information about H7N9 infections and about how Canadians can protect themselves from avian and seasonal influenzas at home and abroad. The risk of H7N9 to Canadians is very low as there is no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission.”

Dr. Gregory Taylor
Chief Public Health Officer of Canada

“I would like to reassure British Columbians that while we have identified the first case of influenza H7N9 here in BC, the risk to the public remains very low. This strain does not transmit easily from person to person, and I am pleased to report that the patient is recovering. I would like to send my best wishes to them, and would also like to thank our dedicated public health officials for their commitment to protecting the health and safety of all British Columbians.”

Terry Lake
Minister of Health, British Columbia

“This represents the first time that we have confirmed influenza H7N9 in North America, but it is a strain that we in the public health community have been watching closely since 2013. I would like to stress that the risk remains very low to the public. This individual did not need to be hospitalized, and is recovering well at home, away from the public. Public health officials are doing comprehensive follow up with contacts to ensure that there is no further spread.”

Dr. Bonnie Henry
Deputy Provincial Health Officer

Related Products

Travel Health Notice for Avian Influenza

Public Health Notice: H7N9 Avian Influenza in China

Contacts

Michael Bolkenius
Office of the Honourable Rona Ambrose
Federal Minister of Health
(613) 957-0200

Media Relations
Public Health Agency of Canada
(613) 957-2983

http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do;jse ... nid=925749

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 6:04 pm 
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FLIGHT AC008
DELAYED (IN FLIGHT) Air Canada
Boeing 777-300
Duration:11 hours 50 minutesDistance:10,285km Meals:Business Class - Breakfast, Meal
Premium Economy - Breakfast, Meal
Economy - Breakfast, Meal
HKG
Monday, 26 Jan
Hong Kong, Hong Kong
(Hong Kong)
Scheduled 19:50
19:40
Departed
Terminal
1

Gate
-

Sunny High: 20°C (68°F)
Low: 17°C (63°F) YVR
Monday, 26 Jan
Vancouver, British Columbia
(Vancouver)
Scheduled 15:15
15:30
Terminal
INT

Gate
D64

Sunny with cloudy periods High: 13°C (55°F)
Low: 7°C (45°F)

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 6:14 pm 
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B.C. resident diagnosed with first North American case of H7N9 avian flu
KELLY GRANT
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Jan. 26 2015, 2:23 PM EST
Last updated Monday, Jan. 26 2015, 5:02 PM EST

The Public Health Agency of Canada has confirmed North America’s first human case of H7N9 influenza, a strain of avian flu that can cause severe pneumonia and death but is not believed to spread easily from person to person.

A British Columbia couple in their 50s fell ill with the “classic” influenza symptoms of a fever and cough shortly after returning to the province’s lower mainland on Jan. 12 following a trip to China.

On Monday morning, tests confirmed that the woman has H7N9. The man, who is also sick, is suspected of having the same strain of the virus, but that has not yet been confirmed.

The couple have isolated themselves at home and are already recovering, public health officials said Monday at a news conference announcing the case. The couple’s contacts are being monitored for symptoms, but none have fallen ill so far.

“I want to emphasize that the risk to Canadians is very low because there is no evidence of sustained human transmission of H7N9,” said Gregory Taylor, Canada’s chief public health officer. “This particular strain of H7N9 has not been found in wild or domestic birds in Canada. The virus H7N9 is not like H5N1 avian influenza. H5N1 transmits much more easily between birds and people and those infected usually have more severe illness.”

H7N9, a subtype of influenza that had been found in birds in the past, was first discovered in humans in China in March of 2013. Since then, about 500 human cases of the strain have been documented in China. The strain has caused concern in that country because it tends to lead to symptoms more serious than those caused by typical influenza, including severe pneumonia.

In its most recent formal assessment of the risk posed by H7N9, published last October, the World Health Organization found 453 laboratory-confirmed cases of the strain and 175 deaths.

In the case of the British Columbia couple, public health officials are not certain precisely where or how they contracted the virus. They did not visit any Chinese farms or live poultry markets, which are common places for H7N9 to make the leap from birds to humans. They were part of an organized tour for part of their trip, but travelled on their own as well.

“They did some touring of areas and villages in China where poultry are seen throughout the village, but there was not a particularly high-risk exposure that we were able to identify,” said Bonnie Henry, British Columbia's deputy provincial health officer.

The couple flew home on Air Canada Flight 8 from Hong Kong to Vancouver, landing Jan. 12.

However, neither was symptomatic on the plane, so public health officials believe it is highly unlikely they transmitted the virus to others on the flight. Doctors believe both contracted the virus directly from a bird while in China; they do not think one member of the couple passed it to the other.

A few days after returning from their vacation, the man began to experience flu-like symptoms. The next day, the woman fell ill, too. She visited her family doctor, who took a swab that was sent on for testing, first at a provincial laboratory in British Columbia and then at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.

Both were treated with antiviral medication and neither required hospitalization.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/bri ... e22638787/

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 8:55 pm 
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Canadian has first H7N9 case in North America
Filed Under: Avian Influenza (Bird Flu); H7N9 Avian Influenza
Robert Roos | News Editor | CIDRAP News | Jan 26, 2015

Canadian officials announced today that a British Columbia resident who recently returned from China is recovering from an H7N9 avian flu infection, marking the first known case in North America.

In a statement, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) said the risk to others is very low, because evidence suggests that the virus does not spread easily from person to person.

A public health official in British Columbia said the patient is a woman and that a man who traveled with her was also sick recently, according to a Canadian Press (CP) report today. The official, Bonnie Henry, MD, said additional testing is under way to find out if the man also was infected.

The PHAC said the infected patient, who was not identified, didn't get sick until after arriving in Canada. The person was not hospitalized and is now recovering in "self-isolation," the agency said. Her companion also was not hospitalized and is recovering, according to the CP report.

"All close contacts of the [infected] individual have been identified and their health is being monitored by provincial public health authorities," the statement said.

Saying the government wants to provide Canadians with all the information they need, the agency disclosed that the patient was a passenger on Air Canada flight 8, but it didn't reveal the date he or she flew.

Active H7N9 circulation in China
The case comes at a time of active H7N9 circulation in China, with new cases reported nearly every day in recent weeks. Chinese officials have reported six new cases in the past few days (see below).

Human H7N9 illness first emerged in China in February 2013. A total of 530 cases have been identified since then, according to a case list maintained by FluTrackers, an infectious disease news message board. About a fourth of these have been fatal, but there are no official records of the death toll.

Nearly all the cases have occurred in Canada and Hong Kong. One case was reported in February 2014 in Malaysia, in a visiting Chinese woman, and Taiwan has reported at least three cases, all in people who had been in China recently, according to information from past CIDRAP reports and FluTrackers.

Almost all H7N9 patients so far reported contact with poultry, usually in live-poultry markets, the PHAC statement noted.

Today's announcement comes a bit more than a year after Canada announced North America's first known—and as yet only—human case of H5N1 avian flu. It involved a young nurse from Alberta woman who had visited Beijing in December 2013 and died on Jan 3, 2014, about a week after returning home.

Six cases in Guangdong province
As mentioned, Chinese officials have reported six new H7N9 avian flu cases, all in Guangdong province, the hardest-hit region so far this year, according to three updates in recent days from Hong Kong's Centre for Health Protection (CHP).

The six cases are in five separate cities. Today the CHP confirmed H7N9 infections in a 52-year-old man in Jieyang and a 20-year-old woman in Shanwei. The man is listed in critical condition, and the woman is in serious condition.

Yesterday the agency confirmed that a 78-year-old woman in Shanwei is hospitalized in serious condition and a 62-year-old man in Dongguan is hospitalized in critical condition. On Jan 24 the CHP confirmed H7N9 in a 46-year-old man in Meizhou and a 77-year-old man in Chaozhou, both of whom are in critical condition.

In a separate press release on Jan 24, the CHP updated its report on the second case imported to Hong Kong from the mainland this winter, which the agency first noted on Jan 23. The CHP said it is monitoring 62 contacts, including 7 close contacts, 2 of whom are family members who have not had symptoms.

Editorial director Jim Wappes contributed to this story.

See also:

Jan 26 PHAC statement

Jan 26 Canadian Press story

Jan 8, 2014, CIDRAP News story on Canadian H5N1 case

Jan 26 CHP update

Jan 25 CHP update

Jan 24 CHP update

Jan 24 CHP news release on imported case

FluTrackers H7N9 case list

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspect ... th-america

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 9:31 pm 
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Women in China after the tour back to Canada confirmed H7N9 bird flu infected

2015-01-27 09:04 HKT
A woman living in British Columbia's tourism in China after returning to Canada, confirmed infected with H7N9 avian influenza. Canadian health authorities said, is North America's first human cases of H7N9 infection, I believe that patients infected during China.
British Columbia health officials say a man with a female patient counterparts, also cold symptoms, authorities suspect he is also infected with H7N9 virus were awaiting test results.

Officials said the two are more than 50 years of age, the condition did not require hospitalization, are receiving special blessing flu treatment, and self-isolation at home, is currently recovering.


Related news topics:
H7N9 bird flu

http://rthk.hk/rthk/news/expressnews/20 ... 072337.htm

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 26, 2015 10:06 pm 
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First human bird flu case in North America after woman flies from Hong Kong to Vancouver
North America's first case of avian flu involves patient who travelled in mainland China, then flew out of HK on January 12 Air Canada Flight
PUBLISHED : Tuesday, 27 January, 2015, 9:44am
UPDATED : Tuesday, 27 January, 2015, 9:57am
Ian Young in Vancouver
ian.young@scmp.com

North America’s first case of bird flu in humans has been identified in a Vancouver-area woman who returned to the city on a flight from Hong Kong this month.

Canadian health authorities said the patient, who tested positive to the H7N9 strain of avian flu on Monday morning, is not gravely ill. Because the risk of transmission is low, the woman is being allowed to recover at home, authorities said.

“The individual did not require hospitalisation and is currently recovering from their illness, in self-isolation,” said a statement issued Monday by the health ministers of Canada and British Columbia.

“All close contacts of the individual have been identified and their health is being monitored by provincial public health authorities. The Canadian healthcare system has strong procedures and controls in place to respond to and control the spread of infectious diseases and protect healthcare workers.”

The patient arrived in Vancouver on Air Canada Flight 8 on January 12. Canada’s Public Health Agency stressed that the patient had “recently returned to Canada from China”, but Flight 8 departs from Hong Kong.

“Though the individual was not symptomatic [during the flight], and H7N9 does not transmit easily from person-to-person, the Agency is committed to ensuring Canadians have all the information they need, as a result, we are sharing the flight number,” the agency said.

It said the woman was a resident of British Columbia and that she only became sick after arriving back home. “The risk to Canadians of getting sick with H7N9 is very low as evidence suggests that it does not transmit easily from person-to-person,” the statement said. The H7N9 strain has not been detected in Canadian poultry.

A 68-year-old woman tested positive for H7N9 in Hong Kong last month, and the discovery of the virus in poultry imported from the mainland resulted in a cull and the closure of the Cheung Sha Wan market. Live poultry sales were temporarily halted but resumed on January 11.

“I would like to reassure British Columbians that while we have identified the first case of influenza H7N9 here in BC, the risk to the public remains very low,” said BC health minister Terry Lake said. “This strain does not transmit easily from person to person, and I am pleased to report that the patient is recovering. I would like to send my best wishes to [her family], and would also like to thank our dedicated public health officials for their commitment to protecting the health and safety of all British Columbians.”

Dr Gregory Taylor, Chief Public Health Officer of Canada, said the “risk of H7N9 to Canadians is very low as there is no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission.”

The Globe and Mail newspaper reported that the patient and her husband, both aged in their 50s, had travelled together and both were now sick at home. Tests have not yet confirmed the man’s suspected H7N9 infection.

The newspaper quoted Bonnie Henry, BC’s deputy provincial health officer, as saying the couple “did some touring of areas and villages in China where poultry are seen throughout the village, but there was not a particularly high-risk exposure that we were able to identify.”

Authorities in China and the World Health Organisation had been notified about the BC case, the Canadian Public Health Agency said.

H7N9 emerged in China in 2013, and last year infected more than 450 people there, killing 175, the World Health Organisation said.

Canada’s large and well-travelled mainland Chinese and Hong Kong immigrant populations have previously had public health implications for the country, most significantly during the 2003 outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (Sars). A major outbreak of the disease occurred in Toronto, triggered by a patient who was infected in Hong Kong’s Metropole Hotel and then flew to Canada.

Forty-four people died and more than 400 were infected in Toronto. Vancouver narrowly avoided a major outbreak when another person infected at the Metropole was swiftly diagnosed and isolated upon arrival in British Columbia. A nurse at the hospital where the man was quarantined was the only case of secondary transmission in Vancouver; three other probable Sars cases in Vancouver were contracted outside Canada.

http://www.scmp.com/news/world/article/ ... -hong-kong

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2015 4:41 am 
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British Columbia woman tests positive for H7N9 bird flu


BY SHARON KIRKEY, POSTMEDIA NEWS JANUARY 26, 2015 11:00 PM

Canadian health officials announced Monday a woman in her 50s from B.C.'s Lower Mainland has tested positive for avian influenza A (H7N9), the potentially deadly virus that has infected hundreds of people in China since first emerging in humans in March 2013.
Photograph by: Gillian Wong, The Associated Press Files , Postmedia News
The first North American human case of H7N9 bird flu has been confirmed in B.C. Canadian health officials announced Monday a woman in her 50s from B.C.'s Lower Mainland has tested positive for avian influenza A (H7N9), the potentially deadly virus that has infected hundreds of people in China since first emerging in humans in March 2013.

Another family member, a man who travelled with the B.C. woman to China, is believed to have been infected as well. They only developed symptoms after returning home to Canada earlier this month.

Both are recovering well and did not require hospitalization, federal Health Minister Rona Ambrose said during a hastily called media conference Monday from Ottawa. Ambrose said the risk to Canadians is low and there is no evidence the virus transmits easily from person to person.

According to the World Health Organization, most known human infections with H7N9 resulted from exposure to infected live poultry or contaminated environments, such as markets where poultry is sold and slaughtered.

Canada's public health agency has notified China, the WHO and other international agencies about the Canadian case, Ambrose said. All potential contacts are being followed up, B.C. Health Minister Terry Lake said. "We are working closely with the Public Health Agency of Canada to ensure a robust and co-ordinated response," Lake said.

H7N9 influenza isn't the same as seasonal flu that circulates every winter, stressed Dr. Gregory Taylor, Canada's chief public health officer. H7N9 is an avian form of influenza circulating among birds. However, this particular strain has never been found in wild or domestic birds in Canada, Taylor said.

It's also not like H5N1 bird flu - the virus that last year infected and killed a young Alberta woman who had travelled to Beijing. H5N1 transmits more easily between birds and between people, Taylor said.

The B.C. woman became sick two days after returning to Canada on Jan. 12. Taylor said she had travelled to "various locations" in Canada. She began to feel sick Jan. 14 and sought medical help, but wasn't sick enough to require hospitalization, Taylor said.

Officials said they're confident the B.C. residents got sick from the same common exposure, rather than from transmitting the virus from one to the other.

Neither the man nor the woman had symptoms while they were travelling. Officials said there is likely no risk to other travellers. Both are in "self-isolation" at home. All close contacts have been identified and their health is being monitored.

None of the identified contacts has developed flu-like illness. Given that, "it is extremely unlikely that we will see any additional cases here in B.C.," said B.C. deputy provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry.

Common symptoms included fever, cough and shortness of breath. In China, most of the infected developed severe pneumonia. There have been at least 175 confirmed deaths in China.

B.C. health officials notified the federal public health agency Jan. 23 that it was dealing with a potential case. A sample was sent to Canada's national microbiology laboratory in Winnipeg Sunday for testing.

The lab confirmed the diagnosis Monday.

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/British+C ... story.html

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