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PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2014 3:53 pm 
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H5N2 in pintail in US

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2014 4:01 pm 
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Information received on 16/12/2014 from Dr John Clifford, Deputy Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, United States of America
Summary
Report type Immediate notification
Date of start of the event 10/12/2014
Date of pre-confirmation of the event 15/12/2014
Report date 16/12/2014
Date submitted to OIE 16/12/2014
Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence 2004
Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Serotype H5N2
Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to a defined zone within the country
New outbreaks (1)
Outbreak 1 Whatcom County, Whatcom , WASHINGTON
Date of start of the outbreak 10/12/2014
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Not applicable
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Northern Pintail:Anas acuta(Anatidae)
Affected population Wild pintail ducks
Summary of outbreaks Total outbreaks: 1
Total animals affected
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Northern Pintail:Anas acuta(Anatidae) **
Outbreak statistics
Species Apparent morbidity rate Apparent mortality rate Apparent case fatality rate Proportion susceptible animals lost*
Northern Pintail:Anas acuta(Anatidae) ** ** ** **
*Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
**Not calculated because of missing information
Epidemiology
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
Unknown or inconclusive
Epidemiological comments As a precaution and in response to the recent HPAI outbreak in Canada, surveillance of poultry premises and of wild bird mortality events was enhanced by the USDA, and State personnel along the United States - Canadian Border. Through this surveillance, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 was identified in wild birds. Two serotypes were identified on enhanced surveillance, both with amino acid sequence at the HA cleavage site consistent with HPAI, H5N8 and H5N2. H5N8 was identified in a captive wild gyrfalcon that was fed hunter killed wild birds from Whatcom County, Washington and H5N2 was identified in a wild pintail duck also from Whatcom County, Washington. Preliminary analysis suggests this H5N2 is similar to the HPAI identified in the current Canadian outbreak. Based upon sequence attempt from a virus isolate, an avian influenza subtype H5 of Eurasian lineage (partial HA 98% similarity to A/bean goose/Korea/H40/2014) and N2 of US wild bird lineage (partial NA 98% similarity to A/American green-winged teal/California/HKWF609/2007); the amino acid sequence at the hemagglutinin cleavage site is consistent with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). Preliminary data suggests that these virus strains (H5N2 and H5N8) may be related with the H5N8 strain potentially representing the progenitor; however further analysis is needed. Neither of these viruses has been found in any poultry in the United States. These H5N8 and H5N2 detections involve only wild birds. Further investigation and characterization of the HPAI viruses is ongoing.
Control measures
Measures applied
Vaccination prohibited
No treatment of affected animals
Measures to be applied
No other measures
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory name and type Species Test Test date Result
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Northern Pintail gene sequencing Pending
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Northern Pintail haemagglutination (HA) test 15/12/2014 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Northern Pintail real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 15/12/2014 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (National laboratory) Northern Pintail virus isolation 15/12/2014 Positive
Future Reporting
The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2014 4:59 pm 
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USDA Confirms H5 Avian Influenza in Washington State Wild Birds
H5N2 Found in Northern Pintail Ducks & H5N8 Found in Captive Gyrfalcons
WASHINGTON, Dec. 16, 2014— The United States Department of Agriculture’s
(USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of
highly pathogenic (HPAI) H5 avian influenza in wild birds in Whatcom County,
Washington. Two separate virus strains were identified: HPAI H5N2 in northern pintail
ducks and HPAI H5N8 in captive Gyrfalcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds.
Neither virus has been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the United States.
There is no immediate public health concern with either of these avian influenza viruses.
Both H5N2 and H5N8 viruses have been found in other parts of the world and have not
caused any human infection to date.
The finding in Whatcom County was quickly reported and identified due to increased
surveillance for avian influenza in light of the HPAI H5N2 avian influenza affecting
commercial poultry in British Columbia, Canada.
Washington State, USDA, and other Federal partners are working jointly on additional
surveillance and testing of birds in the nearby area.
All bird owners, whether commercial producers or backyard enthusiasts, are encouraged
to practice good biosecurity, prevent contact between their birds and wild birds, and to
report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through your state
veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593. Additional
information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at
healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/ ... luenza.pdf

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2014 5:34 pm 
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Map update

https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit? ... NlIM&hl=en

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2014 5:35 pm 
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niman wrote:

Less than 9 miles from two turkey farms in Aldergrove and egg layer farm in Langley

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:48 am 
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Wild duck, captive falcon infected with bird flu in Washington

Don Jenkins
Capital Press
Published:
December 16, 2014 5:23PM

Officals say avian flu has been found in Washington state. Ten British Columbia poultry farms have been infected with a highly contagious strain of avian influenza.

Officials say a wild duck and a captive falcon in Whatcom County in northwest Washington state were infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza, similar to the virus killing thousands of chickens and turkeys in British Columbia.
Image
The H5N2 virus, which has struck 10 B.C. poultry farms, was found in a northern pintail duck. A separate highly contagious avian influenza strain, H5N8, was found in a gryfalcon, which died after eating a hunter-killed wild duck.

Both types are equally dangerous, State Veterinarian Joe Baker said. Further tests will have to be conducted to determine whether the H5N2 virus found in the Whatcom County duck precisely matches the genetic makeup of the strain in B.C., he said.

Avian influenza has not been found in any Washington poultry, state Department of Agriculture spokesman Hector Castro said. The department has stepped up testing of flocks in Whatcom County since the outbreak in Canada.

Baker said he believes this was the first time a highly pathogenic strain of avian influenza has been found in Washington state.

He encouraged poultry owners in northwest Washington to alert WSDA to ill birds. “We feel like testing dead and sick and birds will be very important,” he said.

WSDA will hold a town hall meeting at 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 18, in the Mount Baker Rotary Building at the Northwest Washington Fairgrounds in Lynden to discuss avian influenza and steps poultry owners should take to protect their birds.

The meeting will be open to the public. WSDA particularly encouraged poultry producers or owners of backyard flocks to attend.

The virus was first reported in British Columbia on Dec. 1 and has killed or forced authorities to euthanize 233,800 birds, according to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

The H5N2 virus was confirmed Dec. 13 at a 10th operation, a 53,000-acre chicken farm in Langley, about 29 miles east of Vancouver.

The farm was the largest and the first outside the Abbotsford-Chilliwack area, which is farther east and near the Washington border.

Castro said publicity about the disease outbreak in Canada prompted the falcon owner in Washington to report its death.

Swab samples from the captive gyrfalcon were sent to the Washington State University Avian Health & Food Safety Laboratory in Puyallup. The USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Iowa confirmed the positive tests over the weekend.

Baker called the wild duck that the falcon ate the “smoking gun,” though further USDA tests will have to be done on meat leftover from the duck to confirm whether that’s what gave the falcon the virus.

It was not immediately known where the hunter killed that duck.

The other duck, a northern pintail, was found at Wiser Lake south of Lynden, Baker said.

Humans are rarely affected by avian influenza and there has never been a reported instance of a person becoming ill from an infected bird in the United States, although some cases have occurred in foreign countries where people have come in close contact with infected birds, according to WSDA.

The virus can be spread by direct contact with infected birds, contaminated equipment and through airborne transmission over short distances. The virus is found in feces, saliva and respiratory secretions of birds carrying the disease.

Signs of infection include decreased appetite, coughing and sneezing, lowered egg production, greenish diarrhea, excessive thirst and swollen wattles and combs.

Persons seeing sickness in domestic birds are asked to contact the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. Sick and dead wild birds should be reported to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.

http://www.capitalpress.com/Washington/ ... washington

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 2:43 pm 
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Avian flu outbreak that started in Chilliwack crosses U.S. border
Image
Most of the western half of Chilliwack is in the CFIA's avian influenza restricted zone.— Image Credit: Paul J. Henderson
0
by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 18, 2014 at 9:00 AM
The Fraser Valley’s outbreak of avian influenza has now crossed the U.S. border and at least one American expert isn’t impressed with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) response.

Biomedical researcher Henry Niman is concerned the highly pathogenic strain will spread throughout North America as wild birds begin winter migration.

No poultry farms in the U.S. were impacted by Wednesday, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported Tuesday that the H5N2 strain found in Chilliwack, Abbotsford and now Langley has been detected in northern pintail ducks in Lynden, Wash., fewer than 15 kilometres from the Fraser Valley cluster.

“The finding in Whatcom County was quickly reported and identified due to increased surveillance for avian influenza in light of the [highly pathogenic] H5N2 avian influenza affecting commercial poultry in British Columbia, Canada,” said a USDA statement issued Dec. 16.

In addition, a highly pathogenic H5N8 strain was found in Washington in three captive falcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds.

Niman, who is president of Pittsburgh-based Recombinomics, analyzes viral evolution and the spread of disease.

“The wild birds really can’t be controlled, which is why this is a very big deal that could have a serious impact on poultry markets throughout the Americas,” Niman told the Times.

“Poultry farmers throughout North America should be worried.”

Niman says the CFIA is trying to “manage the message” and downplay concerns, releasing information too slowly, something that could have far-reaching consequences.

As of Wednesday morning, the CFIA had reported 10 farms in the Fraser Valley affected by the current outbreak. Approximately 233,800 chickens and turkeys have either died from the illness or been euthanized.

The first farm where avian flu was detected was a broiler breeder with 13,000 birds in Chilliwack, although no other farms in the city have been directly impacted by the outbreak. Eight of the other farms affected are in Abbotsford—three turkey and five broiler breeders.

The latest and the largest is a 53,000 table egg layer farm in Langley.

The CFIA did say Wednesday that the H5N8 was the first time a "Eurasian lineage highly pathogenic H5 virus has caused an outbreak of avian influenza in poultry in North America."

"The appearance of this particular reassortant virus is significant due to its ability to cause high mortality in domestic poultry," a Dec. 17 CFIA statement said.

No H5N2 illness has been reported in humans, but the CFIA said that as a precautionary measure, public health officials are monitoring workers who are exposed to affected poultry.

While the illness is not dangerous to people, and the outbreak is likely to have little or no impact on consumers, the industry is feeling the effects as a three-level disease control zone has been set up in the province. The largest primary control zone covers the entire southern half of the province from Highway 16 south. Then there is a restricted zone from that encompassing an area between three and 10 kilometres away from infected farms. Chilliwack residents may have seen signs identifying this zone on the eastern side of Vedder Road closer to the Vedder River. The highest restrictions are in the “infected” zone, the area within three kilometres from any known infected premises, which in Chilliwack means most of Greendale and Yarrow.

The CFIA did not respond to a request to comment on Niman’s suggestion they have under-reacted to the current outbreak.

“All of this will come out eventually and pretending it isn’t as big as it is doesn’t solve the problem,” Niman said. “Most of the spread will likely be through independent introductions by wild birds, which is very hard to control.”

http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/286246111.html

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 7:55 am 
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Again bird flu infection Canada

Langley - In Canada, another company affected by the H5N2 virus. It is a broiler grower in Langley, British Columbia. The 11,800 animals will be culled on the farm.
Again bird flu infection Canada
It is the eleventh Canadian poultry when the virus is found. All companies where H5N2 has been found lying in the Fraser Valley, an area close poultry in southwestern Canada, near the border with the United States. Here the H5N2 virus was found last week in a wild gyrfalcon, after the US tightened controls because of the recent bird flu outbreaks in the neighboring country. It was also found in the same study the H5N8 virus in a wild duck, the same type as the bird flu virus that Europe retains its spell.

Studies in wild birds in Canada are found so far no traces of bird flu yet. However, American experts are worried that North American companies will also become infected, as wild birds will pull in the winter, reports the Langley Times.

According to the Canadian Food Inspection Authority contains the H5N2 virus that British Columbia plaguing gene segments which correspond to those of the Eurasian H5N8 virus, including the H5 gene, and it contains in addition, segments which are typical North American viruses, including the N2 gene.



See the map of Farm for all outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in 2014 worldwide.
by KIRSTEN GRAUMANS Dec 19, 2014

http://www.boerderij.nl/Pluimveehouderi ... -1669612W/

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 10:06 am 
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niman wrote:
Avian flu outbreak that started in Chilliwack crosses U.S. border
Image
Most of the western half of Chilliwack is in the CFIA's avian influenza restricted zone.— Image Credit: Paul J. Henderson
0
by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 18, 2014 at 9:00 AM
The Fraser Valley’s outbreak of avian influenza has now crossed the U.S. border and at least one American expert isn’t impressed with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) response.

Biomedical researcher Henry Niman is concerned the highly pathogenic strain will spread throughout North America as wild birds begin winter migration.

No poultry farms in the U.S. were impacted by Wednesday, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported Tuesday that the H5N2 strain found in Chilliwack, Abbotsford and now Langley has been detected in northern pintail ducks in Lynden, Wash., fewer than 15 kilometres from the Fraser Valley cluster.

“The finding in Whatcom County was quickly reported and identified due to increased surveillance for avian influenza in light of the [highly pathogenic] H5N2 avian influenza affecting commercial poultry in British Columbia, Canada,” said a USDA statement issued Dec. 16.

In addition, a highly pathogenic H5N8 strain was found in Washington in three captive falcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds.

Niman, who is president of Pittsburgh-based Recombinomics, analyzes viral evolution and the spread of disease.

“The wild birds really can’t be controlled, which is why this is a very big deal that could have a serious impact on poultry markets throughout the Americas,” Niman told the Times.

“Poultry farmers throughout North America should be worried.”

Niman says the CFIA is trying to “manage the message” and downplay concerns, releasing information too slowly, something that could have far-reaching consequences.

As of Wednesday morning, the CFIA had reported 10 farms in the Fraser Valley affected by the current outbreak. Approximately 233,800 chickens and turkeys have either died from the illness or been euthanized.

The first farm where avian flu was detected was a broiler breeder with 13,000 birds in Chilliwack, although no other farms in the city have been directly impacted by the outbreak. Eight of the other farms affected are in Abbotsford—three turkey and five broiler breeders.

The latest and the largest is a 53,000 table egg layer farm in Langley.

The CFIA did say Wednesday that the H5N8 was the first time a "Eurasian lineage highly pathogenic H5 virus has caused an outbreak of avian influenza in poultry in North America."

"The appearance of this particular reassortant virus is significant due to its ability to cause high mortality in domestic poultry," a Dec. 17 CFIA statement said.

No H5N2 illness has been reported in humans, but the CFIA said that as a precautionary measure, public health officials are monitoring workers who are exposed to affected poultry.

While the illness is not dangerous to people, and the outbreak is likely to have little or no impact on consumers, the industry is feeling the effects as a three-level disease control zone has been set up in the province. The largest primary control zone covers the entire southern half of the province from Highway 16 south. Then there is a restricted zone from that encompassing an area between three and 10 kilometres away from infected farms. Chilliwack residents may have seen signs identifying this zone on the eastern side of Vedder Road closer to the Vedder River. The highest restrictions are in the “infected” zone, the area within three kilometres from any known infected premises, which in Chilliwack means most of Greendale and Yarrow.

The CFIA did not respond to a request to comment on Niman’s suggestion they have under-reacted to the current outbreak.

“All of this will come out eventually and pretending it isn’t as big as it is doesn’t solve the problem,” Niman said. “Most of the spread will likely be through independent introductions by wild birds, which is very hard to control.”

http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/286246111.html

UPDATE: 11th farm hit with Avian flu, outbreak that started in Chilliwack enters U.S.

by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 18, 2014 at 9:00 AM— updated Dec 19, 2014 at 9:11 AM
The Fraser Valley’s outbreak of avian influenza has now crossed the U.S. border and at least one American expert isn’t impressed with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) response.

Biomedical researcher Henry Niman is concerned the highly pathogenic strain will spread throughout North America as wild birds begin winter migration.

No poultry farms in the U.S. were impacted by Wednesday, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported Tuesday that the H5N2 strain found in Chilliwack, Abbotsford and now Langley has been detected in northern pintail ducks in Lynden, Wash., fewer than 15 kilometres from the Fraser Valley cluster.

“The finding in Whatcom County was quickly reported and identified due to increased surveillance for avian influenza in light of the [highly pathogenic] H5N2 avian influenza affecting commercial poultry in British Columbia, Canada,” said a USDA statement issued Dec. 16.

In addition, a highly pathogenic H5N8 strain was found in Washington in three captive falcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds.

Niman, who is president of Pittsburgh-based Recombinomics, analyzes viral evolution and the spread of disease.

“The wild birds really can’t be controlled, which is why this is a very big deal that could have a serious impact on poultry markets throughout the Americas,” Niman told the Times.

“Poultry farmers throughout North America should be worried.”

Niman says the CFIA is trying to “manage the message” and downplay concerns, releasing information too slowly, something that could have far-reaching consequences.

As of Friday morning, the CFIA had reported 11 farms in the Fraser Valley affected by the current outbreak. Approximately 245,600 chickens and turkeys have either died from the illness or been euthanized.

The first farm where avian flu was detected was a broiler breeder with 13,000 birds in Chilliwack, although no other farms in the city have been directly impacted by the outbreak. Eight of the other farms affected are in Abbotsford—three turkey and five broiler breeders.

The 10th and largest was a 53,000 table egg layer farm in Langley on Dec. 13. Then on Dec. 17, a second Langley farm, a 11,800-chicken broiler breeder was added to the list.

The CFIA said Wednesday that the H5N8 was the first time a "Eurasian lineage highly pathogenic H5 virus has caused an outbreak of avian influenza in poultry in North America."

"The appearance of this particular reassortant virus is significant due to its ability to cause high mortality in domestic poultry," a Dec. 17 CFIA statement said.

No H5N2 illness has been reported in humans, but the CFIA said that as a precautionary measure, public health officials are monitoring workers who are exposed to affected poultry.

In response to questions from Niman that the CFIA has not acted quickly enough, a spokesperson said the agency "is committed to sharing new information related to the avian influenza situation in a timely manner. The Agency regularly posts updates to the web via the Infected Premises Table, the Timeline of Events, and online statements."

CFIA agrees that wild birds are a problem since they cannot be controlled, which is why biosecurity on farms plays a "very important role."

"Wild birds are certainly a serious concern regarding the spread of this disease as wild birds are natural reservoirs of influenza viruses and have natural migration pathways," the agency said.

The CFIA has not detected either H5N2 or H5N8 in wild birds anywhere in Canada in 2014.

While the illness is not dangerous to people, and the outbreak is likely to have little or no impact on consumers, the industry is feeling the effects as a three-level disease control zone has been set up in the province. The largest primary control zone covers the entire southern half of the province from Highway 16 south. Then there is a restricted zone from that encompassing an area between three and 10 kilometres away from infected farms. Chilliwack residents may have seen signs identifying this zone on the eastern side of Vedder Road closer to the Vedder River. The highest restrictions are in the “infected” zone, the area within three kilometres from any known infected premises, which in Chilliwack means most of Greendale and Yarrow.

“All of this will come out eventually and pretending it isn’t as big as it is doesn’t solve the problem,” Niman said. “Most of the spread will likely be through independent introductions by wild birds, which is very hard to control.”

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 10:59 am 
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Hong Kong banned poultry products enter the Greater Vancouver
[2014-12-19]

Newspaper correspondent reports
GVRD outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N2, Hong Kong Centre for Food Safety from the 19th to prohibit GVRD poultry and poultry products, including eggs imported to protect the public health. Food Safety Center, said Hong Kong from January to October this year, more than 7,000 tonnes of frozen poultry meat imports and about 170,000 eggs from Canada.
The center has contacted the Canadian authorities on the incident, and continue to closely monitor the OIE issued a message on the Canadian outbreak of avian influenza, in response to the epidemic development and take appropriate action.
Avian influenza south reached Washington
on the other hand, the recent outbreak in British Columbia's Fraser Valley bird flu, has crossed the US border, US authorities refer to the state of Washington have wild birds were found with the bird flu virus. In addition, US experts believe that the Canadian authorities have reacted too slowly.
According to "The Langley Times" (The Langley Times) reported that although the United States as of Wednesday until the United States has no poultry farms affected by bird flu, but the US Department of Agriculture said Tuesday, in British Columbia Chilliwack Walker (Chilliwack), Awa Roosevelt ( (Abbotsford) and Langley found H5N2 virus, is now less than 15 kilometers away from the Fraser Valley of Washington State Linden (Lynden) of pintail be detected.
In addition, they found that high pathogenic in Washington three Falcons virus H5N8. US biomedical experts宁曼(Henry Niman) fear that as the beginning of migratory wild birds wintering bird flu will spread in North America.宁曼also said that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is too slow in issuing Facts .
As of Wednesday morning, CFIA has confirmed that there are as many as 10 farms by avian influenza, only to be destroyed about 233,800 chickens and turkeys, but the latest affected farm is in Langley.

http://news.singtao.ca/vancouver/2014-1 ... 71287.html

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