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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 1:27 am 
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Avian flu found in SE Wash. backyard flock; 2nd appearance in state; no public health danger
Jan 3, 2015 The Associated Press 0
OLYMPIA, Wash. – Avian influenza has been found in a backyard poultry flock in southeast Washington after previously showing up in wild birds in the northwest part of the state, but there is no immediate public health concern, state officials said Friday.

The virus has not been found in commercial poultry in Washington or elsewhere in the United States, state Agriculture Department officials said. They say the virus poses no apparent threat to humans but highly pathogenic strains can be deadly to domestic poultry and sometimes to wild birds.

Avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat, the agency said.

Officials say the owner of the flock of about 150 birds near Benton City contacted the Agriculture Department after losing nearly 50 birds in the past week.

The state Agriculture Department says it has activated a multi-agency response and will work closely with U.S. Department of Agriculture officials.

The highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza virus confirmed in the flock is similar to the virus found in a Washington captive gyrfalcon last month, although additional testing is being conducted to identify the strain. The falcon had been fed wild birds killed by hunters. A separate strain of the H5 virus was found in a wild duck. Both viruses have been found in other parts of the world and have not caused any human infection to date, the USDA has said.

Canadian officials say an avian influenza outbreak in British Columbia has spread to more than a half dozen poultry farms and affected about 245,000 birds.

The Benton County backyard flock includes domestic waterfowl with access to the outdoors.

“We have not diagnosed the virus anywhere else in our domestic poultry population, but the presence of the virus in migratory waterfowl is a risk to backyard poultry,” state veterinarian Dr. Joe Baker said Friday in a statement. “One step owners should take is preventing contact between their birds and wild birds.”

Also last month, federal agricultural officials confirmed the presence of a strain of the H5 virus in guinea fowl and chickens in a 100-bird backyard poultry flock in the southern Oregon community of Winston.

http://www.canadianbusiness.com/busines ... th-danger/?

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 8:56 am 
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Avian flu kills 50 in Benton City domestic flock
Email Print Comments Share Tweet POSTED ON JANUARY 3, 2015

Kristi Pihl
Tri-City Herald



BENTON CITY, Wash. — Tri-City area backyard chickens and other domestic poultry may be at risk of catching a deadly avian flu after the disease killed nearly 50 birds in Benton City.

It’s the first time that avian flu has been detected in a domestic flock in Washington state.

The free-range domestic flock of 150 birds, including chickens, turkeys and waterfowl, used a pond also visited by migratory wild birds, said Hector Castro, the state Department of Agriculture’s communications manager.

After nearly 50 of the domestic flock died in one week, a Benton City resident contacted the state. Washington State University’s Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman confirmed earlier this week that the Benton City birds had H5 avian influenza virus.

Humans are not at risk of avian flu, Castro said. And meat and eggs from infected birds remain safe to eat.

But this particular strain of influenza is considered highly pathogenic and deadly to poultry, he said. Poultry that catch the disease likely will die within three days.

Kennewick, Richland and Pasco allow residents to own backyard chickens, but the numbers are limited to three to five birds.

Backyard chickens and poultry owners should keep their birds away from wild birds, Castro said.

Many birds migrate through the Tri-City area, and there are plenty of bodies of water and wildlife refuges where wild birds and waterfowl congregate.

“Wild birds can really be carriers of this disease,” he said.

Many times, wild birds may not even get sick, but can spread it to poultry, Castro said.

The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the U.S.

Most commercial operations keep their birds contained and test them regularly, Castro said. They have a huge financial incentive to keep their birds healthy.

And the commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing program, he said. Inspectors from the state perform weekly testing and health inspections at live bird markets in the state.

Typical symptoms that owners of domestic birds may notice include respiratory issues, coughing or sneezing, lower egg production, decreased appetite and swelling on combs or waddles.

“The best thing people can do is make sure they are running a clean operation and take the basic steps to make sure they are controlling access to their birds so these type of diseases do not get passed on,” Castro said.

State and federal agriculture officials are working on a plan on how to respond to the flu diagnosis, Castro said. A U.S. Department of Agriculture lab is running more tests to determine the specific strain of avian influenza.

Typically, the rest of the flock would be euthanized and tests would be run on birds in other domestic flocks in the area to make sure the disease does not spread, he said.

Losing the birds can be very traumatic, but it’s critical to make sure the highly contagious disease doesn’t spread to anyone else’s flock, he said.

“The (Benton City ) owners are being very cooperative,” Castro said.

The virus is similar to the one recently found in a Whatcom County captive gyrfalcon that was fed wild duck. Oregon also is dealing with avian influenza in a Douglas County backyard flock of guinea fowl and chickens.

Deaths or illnesses in domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 800-606-3056.

For wild birds, call the state Department of Fish and Wildlife at 800-606-8768.

For more information about avian influenza and steps that backyard poultry owners can take, go to agr.wa.gov.
http://www.yakimaherald.com/news/latest ... y-domestic

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 1:28 pm 
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I posted a comment under the Yakima Herald story:

>>>
"Humans are not at risk of avian flu, Castro said. And meat and eggs from infected birds remain safe to eat."

That is a gross distortion of reality. First of all, if a USDA lab is running more tests to determine the specific strain, how does Castro know it isn't the H5N1 strain, which is deadly to humans? Second, even if it is the H5N2 strain which has recently caused the culling of about 250,000 birds in Canada just north of Washington, that strain - according to virologist Henry Niman - is a novel reassortant with a "Fujian" H5 gene extremely similar to the H5 gene in a clade of H5N1 which has infected humans, and tests have shown that this new H5N2 is as deadly to chickens as any H5N1 ever known. It is a new and virulent strain of bird flu which may well have the ability to infect humans.

Furthermore, even though H5N1-infected poultry may be safe to eat if fully cooked at a high-enough temperature, handling the raw poultry prior to cooking can easily result in infection and is extremely dangerous. There have been over 20 people infected in Egypt over the last month and a half, from contact with live or dead infected poultry, some of whom have died.

I strongly believe that the USDA and the Washington Department of Agriculture are downplaying to the public what is in fact a very serious and dangerous situation, in order to protect the poultry industry.

Please do some critical reporting on this issue and don't just parrot what they are saying.
<<<

http://www.yakimaherald.com/news/latest ... y-domestic


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 4:45 pm 
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Avian Flu Outbreak in Washington State Backyard Poultry
04 January 2015
WASHINGTON STATE, US - The H5 avian influenza virus has been confirmed in a backyard poultry flock near Benton City.
Image
The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has activated a multi-agency response plan following the confirmation of highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza in domestic birds in Benton County. WSDA will work closely with the US Department of Agriculture’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) in this response.
The H5 avian influenza virus was confirmed by the Washington State University’s Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman. It was found in birds from a backyard poultry flock near Benton City. The flock of approximately 150 birds includes domestic waterfowl with access to the outdoors. There is also a pond on the premises frequented by migratory birds.
The virus has not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in Washington or the United States.
The bird owner contacted WSDA after experiencing the loss of nearly 50 birds in the past week. The virus is similar to the virus found in a Washington captive gyrfalcon last month, although additional testing is being conducted to further identify the strain of the disease.
WSDA is advising commercial poultry growers and backyard flock owners to be vigilant with biosecurity measures and surveillance.
State veterinarian, Dr Joe Baker, said: “We have a vigorous response plan but this development demonstrates how important good biosecurity can be, especially for backyard bird owners. We have not diagnosed the virus anywhere else in our domestic poultry population, but the presence of the virus in migratory waterfowl is a risk to backyard poultry. One step owners should take is preventing contact between their birds and wild birds.”
Washington’s commercial poultry industry has a robust avian influenza testing programme and WSDA conducts weekly surveillance testing and health inspections at live bird markets in the state. Deaths or illness among domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. For wild birds, contact the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.
There is no immediate public health concern due to the avian influenza virus detected. Avian influenza does not affect poultry meat or egg products, which remain safe to eat. As always, both wild and domestic poultry should be properly cooked.

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultryne ... rd-poultry

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2015 10:22 am 
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In poultry farmers of Washington, USA, that the occurrence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H5N2 subtype) was confirmed, yesterday (Sunday, January 4, 2015), there was a report from the country's animal health authorities.

http://www.maff.go.jp/j/press/syouan/douei/150105.html

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2015 5:16 pm 
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Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/01051 ... rveil.html

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2015 5:17 pm 
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Map update

https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit? ... NlIM&hl=en

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2015 11:20 am 
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Information received on 07/01/2015 from Dr John Clifford, Deputy Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, United States of America
Summary
Report type Follow-up report No. 1
Date of start of the event 10/12/2014
Date of pre-confirmation of the event 15/12/2014
Report date 07/01/2015
Date submitted to OIE 07/01/2015
Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence 2004
Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
Serotype H5N2
Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to a defined zone within the country
Related reports Immediate notification (16/12/2014)
Follow-up report No. 1 (07/01/2015)
New outbreaks (1)
Outbreak 1 Benton County, Benton, WASHINGTON
Date of start of the outbreak 24/12/2014
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Backyard
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 178 37 37 141 0
Affected population The affected premises is a small backyard mixed free-range flock of geese, turkeys, chickens, ducks, and pigeons that are allowed access to the outdoors and regularly exposed to wild migratory waterfowl.
Summary of outbreaks Total outbreaks: 1
Total animals affected
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 178 37 37 141 0
Outbreak statistics
Species Apparent morbidity rate Apparent mortality rate Apparent case fatality rate Proportion susceptible animals lost*
Birds 20.79% 20.79% 100.00% 100.00%
*Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
Epidemiology
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
Contact with wild species
Epidemiological comments The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), in conjunction with State Departments of Agriculture and Wildlife, are continuing to conduct a comprehensive epidemiological investigation and enhanced surveillance in response to the HPAI H5N2 wild bird related event. The USDA APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) confirmed avian influenza virus (AIV) H5N2 in a backyard mixed flock. Preliminary results indicate that the H5N2 identified is 99% similar to the recent H5N2 isolated from the Northern pintail duck. Epidemiological investigation of backyard AIV infected premises as of 6 January 2015: • Two high risk epidemiologically linked contact backyard premises have been identified and placed under quarantine. Biological sampling for AIV has been completed and results are pending. • Enhanced surveillance in a 10 km radius has been implemented. The HPAI H5N2 virus has NOT been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the United States.
Control measures
Measures applied
Stamping out
Quarantine
Movement control inside the country
Vaccination prohibited
No treatment of affected animals
Measures to be applied
Disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory name and type Species Test Test date Result
National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 03/01/2015 Positive
National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus isolation Pending
National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) (National laboratory) Birds virus sequencing 03/01/2015 Positive
Future Reporting
The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid ... rtid=16914

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2015 10:36 pm 
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Published Date: 2015-01-09 19:47:40
Subject: PRO/AH/EDR> Avian influenza (01): USA (WA) backyard poultry, HPAI H5N2, OIE
Archive Number: 20150109.3082193
AVIAN INFLUENZA (01): USA (WASHINGTON) BACKYARD POULTRY, HPAI H5N2, OIE
***********************************************************************
A ProMED-mail post
http://www.promedmail.org
ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
http://www.isid.org

Date: Wed 7 Jan 2015
Source: OIE, WAHID weekly disease information 2015; 28(02) [edited]
http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid ... rtid=16914


Highly pathogenic avian influenza, USA
--------------------------------------
Information received on [and dated] 7 Jan 2015 from Dr John Clifford, deputy administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, USA

Summary
Report type: follow-up report No. 1
Date of start of the event: 10 Dec 2014
Date of pre-confirmation of the event: 15 Dec 2014
Reason for notification: reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence: 2004
Manifestation of disease: clinical disease
Causal agent: highly pathogenic avian influenza [HPAI] virus
Serotype: H5N2
Nature of diagnosis: laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to a defined zone within the country

New outbreaks (1)
Summary of outbreaks: Total outbreaks: 1
Outbreak 1: Benton County, Benton, Washington
Date of start of the outbreak: 24 Dec 2014
Outbreak status: continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit: backyard
Total animals affected:
Species / Susceptible / Cases / Deaths / Destroyed / Slaughtered
Birds / 178 / 37 / 37 / 141 / 0
Affected population: The affected premises is a small backyard mixed free-range flock of geese, turkeys, chickens, ducks, and pigeons that are allowed access to the outdoors and regularly exposed to wild migratory waterfowl.

Outbreak statistics [rates apparent, expressed as percentages]:
Species / Morbidity rate / Mortality rate / Case fatality rate / Proportion susceptible animals lost*
Birds / 20.79 / 20.79 / 100 / 100
*Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter

Epidemiology
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection: contact with wild species
Epidemiological comment: The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), in conjunction with State Departments of Agriculture and Wildlife, are continuing to conduct a comprehensive epidemiological investigation and enhanced surveillance in response to the HPAI H5N2 wild bird related event. The USDA APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) confirmed avian influenza virus (AIV) H5N2 in a backyard mixed flock. Preliminary results indicate that the H5N2 identified is 99 percent similar to the recent H5N2 isolated from the Northern pintail duck. Epidemiological investigation of backyard AIV infected premises as of 6 Jan 2015: 2 high risk epidemiologically linked contact backyard premises have been identified and placed under quarantine. Biological sampling for AIV has been completed and results are pending. Enhanced surveillance in a 10 km [6.2 mile] radius has been implemented. The HPAI H5N2 virus has NOT been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the United States.

Control measures
Measures applied: stamping out; quarantine; movement control inside the country; vaccination prohibited; no treatment of affected animals
Measures to be applied: disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)

Diagnostic test results
Laboratory name and type: National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) (national laboratory)
Species / Test / Test date / Result
Birds / real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) / 3 Jan 2015 / Positive
Birds / virus sequencing / 3 Jan 2015 / Positive
Birds / virus isolation/ - / Pending

Future reporting
The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

[The location of the outbreak can be seen on the interactive map included in the OIE report at the source URL above.]

--
Communicated by:
ProMED-mail
<promed@promedmail.org>

[The enhanced surveillance and increased awareness activities have allowed for the early detection of the virus, which has been limited to findings in wild birds and in small backyard flocks.

The event summaries and updated maps of these detections in the USA are available at http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid ... rtid=16759 and http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid ... rtid=16771.

H5N8 and H5N2 HPAI viruses have not been found in commercial poultry anywhere in the United States. - Mod.CRD

A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at: http://healthmap.org/promed/p/6387.]
See Also
2014
----
Avian influenza (115): USA (OR) backyard poultry, HPAI H5N8, OIE 20141222.3049031
Avian influenza (112): USA (WA) wild birds, HPAI H5N8, H5N2 20141218.3040607
Avian influenza (110): USA (WA) wild birds, HPAI H5N8, H5N2, OIE 20141217.3037995
Avian influenza (108): USA (WA) H5N2, H5N8, wild birds 20141217.3038018
Avian influenza (109): Canada (BC) HPAI H5N2, poultry 20141217.3038022
Avian influenza (107): Germany (NI) poultry, HPAI H5N8 20141216.3037531
Avian influenza (106): Italy (VN) poultry, HPAI H5N8, OIE 20141216.3036371
Avian influenza (104): Canada (BC) HPAI H5N2, poultry, update, OIE 20141210.3024271
Avian influenza (102): Canada (BC) HPAI H5N2, poultry 20141205.3012874
Avian influenza (101): Canada (BC) H5, poultry, RFI, OIE 20141204.3011429
Avian influenza (99): Netherlands (ZH) HPAI H5N8 conf, poultry 20141201.3003249
Avian influenza (98): Netherlands (ZH) H5, poultry 20141130.3000468
Avian influenza (97): HPAI H5N8, Germany, prevention, Japan, wild bird 20141128.2997318
Avian influenza (94): Netherlands (OV) HPAI H5N8, update, alert, OIE, FAO 20141124.2986950
Avian influenza (93): Germany, HPAI H5N8, migratory birds 20141122.2982721
Avian influenza (92): Netherlands (OV) HPAI H5N8, spread, RFI 20141121.2980599
Avian influenza (91): Netherlands (SH), UK (ENG) update, HPAI H5N8, RFI 20141120.2977844
Avian influenza (90): UK (England) domestic duck, HPAI H5N8, control 20141118.2966461
Avian influenza (89): UK (England) domestic duck, HPAI H5, OIE 20141117.2963406
Avian influenza (88): UK (England) domestic duck, H5, HPAI 20141117.2963428
Avian influenza (87): Netherlands (UT) poultry, HPAI H5N8, OIE 20141117.2961931
Avian influenza (86): UK (England) domestic duck, H5, RFI 20141117.2961879
Avian influenza (85): Netherlands (UT) poultry, HPAI H5N8 20141116.2960394
Avian influenza (83): Germany (MV) poultry, HPAI H5N8, migratory birds 20141115.2957974
Avian influenza (82): Japan (SM) HPAI H5N8, wild bird, OIE 20141115.2955318
Avian influenza (81): Germany (MV) poultry, HPAI H5N8, genotype 20141114.2955469
Avian influenza (80): Germany (MV) poultry, HPAI H5N8 20141113.2953243
Avian influenza (79): Germany (MV), poultry, HPAI H5N8, OIE 20141106.2934925
Avian influenza (78): China, poultry, HPAI H5N3, H5N8, H5N1, OIE 20141026.2898069
Avian influenza (74): South Korea (CN) HPAI H5N8, duck, reoccurrence, OIE 20140926.2804737
Avian influenza (70): S Korea, HPAI H5N8, over, RFI 20140905.2751562
Avian influenza (65): South Korea (CN) HPAI H5N8, RFI 20140730.2646054
Avian influenza (63): South Korea, HPAI H5N8, RFI 20140619.2552686
Avian influenza (58): Japan (KM) HPAI H5N8, controlled 20140504.2448688
Avian influenza (56): South Korea, HPAI H5N8, geese, OIE, RFI 20140502.2444300
Avian influenza (53): Japan (KM) HPAI H5N8, update 20140421.2419552
Avian influenza (52): Japan (KM) HPAI serotyped H5N8 20140417.2412249
Avian influenza (17): S. Korea, HPAI H5N8, poultry, spread, OIE, N. Korea, RFI 20140210.2268635
Avian influenza (15): South Korea, HPAI H5N8, poultry, wildfowl 20140203.2252563
Avian influenza (12): South Korea, HPAI H5N8, chicken, migratory birds, spread 20140129.2240988
Avian influenza (07): South Korea (CB) HPAI H5N8, duck, OIE 20140120.2185629
Avian influenza (06): South Korea (CB) HPAI H5N8, duck, migratory birds 20140120.2191161
Avian influenza (05): South Korea (CB) HPAI H5N8, duck 20140119.2183768
.................................................crd/je/dk

http://www.promedmail.org/direct.php?id=3082193

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