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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 12:48 am 
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Although the OIE report cited H5N8 in a captive falcon and H5N2 in a Northern Pintail, the USDA report suggested that there may have been multiple positives in each group. A local information bulletin cites 3 pet falcons in Lyndem in Whatcom County.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 12:59 am 
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Informational bulletin courtesy of Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office, Division of Emergency Management
12/16/2014 | Filed under: Public Information
(Whatcom County, WA)

Informational bulletin courtesy of Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office, Division of Emergency Management

Update on Bird Flu diagnosis, December 16, 2014

The Washington State Department of Agriculture is stepping up testing at Whatcom County, after three falcons with the Avian Bird Flu virus were found in Lynden, Washington. The tests show that three pet falcons had contracted a strain of the virus (H5N8) that is different than the current outbreak north of the Canadian border in Abbotsford, British Columbia.

Canadian officials have confirmed a Langley farm is the latest to be hit by the H5N2 virus strain that has already affected hundreds of thousands of birds in BC. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency officials say 53,000 birds at the unidentified farm were affected. That now pushes the total number of birds that are either dead or set to be euthanized British Columbia to 233,800.

It is unclear where the virus originated here in Whatcom County, but officials think migrating birds may be to blame for its spread. Avian influenza poses little danger to people as long as poultry meat is handled and cooked properly.

The Washington State Department of Agriculture, and the United States Department of Agriculture are leading the investigations into further infections in Whatcom County. If you have questions contact the WA State Dept. of Agriculture at PH: 360/902-1800 or TTY: 800-833-6388

Excellent information on “backyard biosecurity for the birds” is available at: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health ... osecurity/ .

http://www.whatcomready.org/information ... anagement/

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:12 am 
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Map update

https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit? ... 2tn8&hl=en

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 1:44 am 
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Wild duck, captive falcon infected with bird flu in Washington

Don Jenkins
Capital Press
Published:
December 16, 2014 5:23PM

Officals say avian flu has been found in Washington state. Ten British Columbia poultry farms have been infected with a highly contagious strain of avian influenza.

Officials say a wild duck and a captive falcon in Whatcom County in northwest Washington state were infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza, similar to the virus killing thousands of chickens and turkeys in British Columbia.
Image
The H5N2 virus, which has struck 10 B.C. poultry farms, was found in a northern pintail duck. A separate highly contagious avian influenza strain, H5N8, was found in a gryfalcon, which died after eating a hunter-killed wild duck.

Both types are equally dangerous, State Veterinarian Joe Baker said. Further tests will have to be conducted to determine whether the H5N2 virus found in the Whatcom County duck precisely matches the genetic makeup of the strain in B.C., he said.

Avian influenza has not been found in any Washington poultry, state Department of Agriculture spokesman Hector Castro said. The department has stepped up testing of flocks in Whatcom County since the outbreak in Canada.

Baker said he believes this was the first time a highly pathogenic strain of avian influenza has been found in Washington state.

He encouraged poultry owners in northwest Washington to alert WSDA to ill birds. “We feel like testing dead and sick and birds will be very important,” he said.

WSDA will hold a town hall meeting at 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 18, in the Mount Baker Rotary Building at the Northwest Washington Fairgrounds in Lynden to discuss avian influenza and steps poultry owners should take to protect their birds.

The meeting will be open to the public. WSDA particularly encouraged poultry producers or owners of backyard flocks to attend.

The virus was first reported in British Columbia on Dec. 1 and has killed or forced authorities to euthanize 233,800 birds, according to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

The H5N2 virus was confirmed Dec. 13 at a 10th operation, a 53,000-acre chicken farm in Langley, about 29 miles east of Vancouver.

The farm was the largest and the first outside the Abbotsford-Chilliwack area, which is farther east and near the Washington border.

Castro said publicity about the disease outbreak in Canada prompted the falcon owner in Washington to report its death.

Swab samples from the captive gyrfalcon were sent to the Washington State University Avian Health & Food Safety Laboratory in Puyallup. The USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Iowa confirmed the positive tests over the weekend.

Baker called the wild duck that the falcon ate the “smoking gun,” though further USDA tests will have to be done on meat leftover from the duck to confirm whether that’s what gave the falcon the virus.

It was not immediately known where the hunter killed that duck.

The other duck, a northern pintail, was found at Wiser Lake south of Lynden, Baker said.

Humans are rarely affected by avian influenza and there has never been a reported instance of a person becoming ill from an infected bird in the United States, although some cases have occurred in foreign countries where people have come in close contact with infected birds, according to WSDA.

The virus can be spread by direct contact with infected birds, contaminated equipment and through airborne transmission over short distances. The virus is found in feces, saliva and respiratory secretions of birds carrying the disease.

Signs of infection include decreased appetite, coughing and sneezing, lowered egg production, greenish diarrhea, excessive thirst and swollen wattles and combs.

Persons seeing sickness in domestic birds are asked to contact the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-606-3056. Sick and dead wild birds should be reported to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-606-8768.

http://www.capitalpress.com/Washington/ ... washington

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 2:52 am 
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Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/12171 ... lcons.html

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 9:39 am 
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Avian flu confirmed in wild birds in US
Updated: 9:11 pm, Wednesday, 17 December 2014

Image
US agriculture officials have found avian influenza in wild birds in Washington state but say there's no immediate public health concern.

The US Department of Agriculture said separate strains of the H5 virus were identified in a northern pintail duck and a gyrfalcon.

Both viruses have been found in other parts of the world and have not caused any human infection to date, the USDA said. Neither virus has been found in commercial poultry in the US.

An avian influenza outbreak this month in southwest British Columbia spread to several poultry farms, and 155,000 birds have died of the virus or will be euthanised, Canadian officials said last week.

'There's really no reason to panic. This does not represent an increased risk to people,' said Dr. Kristin Mansfield, a veterinarian with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

'There's very little to no risk of these viruses affecting people.'

The state's two confirmed cases are a captive falcon with the H5N8 strain of avian flu, and a wild duck with the H5N2 strain, said Hector Castro, a spokesman for the state Department of Agriculture.

The falcon had been fed wild birds killed by hunters.

Castro said that after the Canadian outbreak, the state stepped up random testing in domestic poultry flocks near the border and put out information to other bird owners.

The falcon was diagnosed after its owner took it to a veterinarian, who then reported its death to the state. A USDA lab in Iowa confirmed the virus over the weekend.

AAP

- See more at: http://www.skynews.com.au/news/world/nt ... pewZ2.dpuf

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 3:44 pm 
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Official Information on the Recent Cases of Avian Flu in WA
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There’s been a lot of discussion about a recent case of Avian Influenza that was reported in waterfowl at Wiser Lake in Whatcom County, which is very near the Canadian border. While the avian influenza virus (aka ”bird flu”) has recently been problematic with the poultry industry in British Columbia, the strains identified in Whatcom County are not the same as the one identified in BC (HPAI H5N2). More research is underway.
Unfortunately, the way these cases came to light was tragic. Many of you may know Dan Pike, who also lives very near the border. One of Dan’s falcons caught a duck and then he fed that duck to a few of his other birds. All four of his falcons that ate the duck died within a few days and were sent off to be tested for cause of death. The first two falcons that died came back positive for a highly pathogenic strain of the virus (HPAI H5N8); the results on the other two falcons are still pending. His other raptors, which have not shown signs of influenza, have been confined to his property and are being closely monitored. It is unknown whether this strain of influenza can also infect humans; because of this Dan and his wife are also being monitored.
On behalf of myself, his friends, and his falconer brothers and sisters: our hearts go out to Dan and his wife for the loss of their birds. You are in our thoughts and we are there for you. - Brad Felger
Effective immediately, those of us that live in the northwest corner of Washington State should NOT feed ducks caught this season to our raptors until more is known. Freezing the ducks does NOT kill this particular virus.
There is a Town Meeting being held in Lynden this Thursday to discuss avian influenza and what backyard poultry breeders, etc. can do to protect their birds. (http://agr.wa.gov/News/2014/14-25.aspx)

The USDA has released a bulletin containing all information known so far. It is highly recommended that you read it. (http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/ ... luenza.pdf)

The USGS has also released a document. (http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/publications/w ... 5_H5N8.pdf)

There’s more information on the WDFW site. (http://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/health/ ... index.html)

http://www.wafalconers.org/

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2014 7:24 pm 
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Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/12171 ... con_4.html

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 2:42 pm 
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Avian flu outbreak that started in Chilliwack crosses U.S. border
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Most of the western half of Chilliwack is in the CFIA's avian influenza restricted zone.— Image Credit: Paul J. Henderson
0
by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 18, 2014 at 9:00 AM
The Fraser Valley’s outbreak of avian influenza has now crossed the U.S. border and at least one American expert isn’t impressed with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) response.

Biomedical researcher Henry Niman is concerned the highly pathogenic strain will spread throughout North America as wild birds begin winter migration.

No poultry farms in the U.S. were impacted by Wednesday, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported Tuesday that the H5N2 strain found in Chilliwack, Abbotsford and now Langley has been detected in northern pintail ducks in Lynden, Wash., fewer than 15 kilometres from the Fraser Valley cluster.

“The finding in Whatcom County was quickly reported and identified due to increased surveillance for avian influenza in light of the [highly pathogenic] H5N2 avian influenza affecting commercial poultry in British Columbia, Canada,” said a USDA statement issued Dec. 16.

In addition, a highly pathogenic H5N8 strain was found in Washington in three captive falcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds.

Niman, who is president of Pittsburgh-based Recombinomics, analyzes viral evolution and the spread of disease.

“The wild birds really can’t be controlled, which is why this is a very big deal that could have a serious impact on poultry markets throughout the Americas,” Niman told the Times.

“Poultry farmers throughout North America should be worried.”

Niman says the CFIA is trying to “manage the message” and downplay concerns, releasing information too slowly, something that could have far-reaching consequences.

As of Wednesday morning, the CFIA had reported 10 farms in the Fraser Valley affected by the current outbreak. Approximately 233,800 chickens and turkeys have either died from the illness or been euthanized.

The first farm where avian flu was detected was a broiler breeder with 13,000 birds in Chilliwack, although no other farms in the city have been directly impacted by the outbreak. Eight of the other farms affected are in Abbotsford—three turkey and five broiler breeders.

The latest and the largest is a 53,000 table egg layer farm in Langley.

The CFIA did say Wednesday that the H5N8 was the first time a "Eurasian lineage highly pathogenic H5 virus has caused an outbreak of avian influenza in poultry in North America."

"The appearance of this particular reassortant virus is significant due to its ability to cause high mortality in domestic poultry," a Dec. 17 CFIA statement said.

No H5N2 illness has been reported in humans, but the CFIA said that as a precautionary measure, public health officials are monitoring workers who are exposed to affected poultry.

While the illness is not dangerous to people, and the outbreak is likely to have little or no impact on consumers, the industry is feeling the effects as a three-level disease control zone has been set up in the province. The largest primary control zone covers the entire southern half of the province from Highway 16 south. Then there is a restricted zone from that encompassing an area between three and 10 kilometres away from infected farms. Chilliwack residents may have seen signs identifying this zone on the eastern side of Vedder Road closer to the Vedder River. The highest restrictions are in the “infected” zone, the area within three kilometres from any known infected premises, which in Chilliwack means most of Greendale and Yarrow.

The CFIA did not respond to a request to comment on Niman’s suggestion they have under-reacted to the current outbreak.

“All of this will come out eventually and pretending it isn’t as big as it is doesn’t solve the problem,” Niman said. “Most of the spread will likely be through independent introductions by wild birds, which is very hard to control.”

http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/286246111.html

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 7:57 am 
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Again bird flu infection Canada

Langley - In Canada, another company affected by the H5N2 virus. It is a broiler grower in Langley, British Columbia. The 11,800 animals will be culled on the farm.
Again bird flu infection Canada
It is the eleventh Canadian poultry when the virus is found. All companies where H5N2 has been found lying in the Fraser Valley, an area close poultry in southwestern Canada, near the border with the United States. Here the H5N2 virus was found last week in a wild gyrfalcon, after the US tightened controls because of the recent bird flu outbreaks in the neighboring country. It was also found in the same study the H5N8 virus in a wild duck, the same type as the bird flu virus that Europe retains its spell.

Studies in wild birds in Canada are found so far no traces of bird flu yet. However, American experts are worried that North American companies will also become infected, as wild birds will pull in the winter, reports the Langley Times.

According to the Canadian Food Inspection Authority contains the H5N2 virus that British Columbia plaguing gene segments which correspond to those of the Eurasian H5N8 virus, including the H5 gene, and it contains in addition, segments which are typical North American viruses, including the N2 gene.



See the map of Farm for all outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in 2014 worldwide.
by KIRSTEN GRAUMANS Dec 19, 2014

http://www.boerderij.nl/Pluimveehouderi ... -1669612W/

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