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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 12:54 pm 
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H5N2 ten Canadian companies

Ottawa - The H5N2 virus has been detected at a poultry farm in Canada tenth. It is a place holder in the laying hens Langley, British Columbia. This reports the Canadian Food and Drugs Authority CFIA.
H5N2 ten Canadian companies
After the virus two weeks ago it was first found in a broiler and turkey grower holder, soon found that many companies were affected, partly because they had received from the broiler grower. All ten of the affected companies are located in the southern province of British Columbia, in the wetlands along the Fraser River. Among the other three infected farms turkey farms, and six broiler farmers. The cause of the contamination is still being sought, which indicates CFIA under perform other research on migratory birds because of previous bird flu outbreaks in Canada the same virus was found in wild birds.

CFIA investigates further examine all movements to and from the affected businesses, which the organization does not exclude too will discover more infections. In total, 233 800 chickens and turkeys culled. The so far cleared businesses found in all the highly pathogenic H5N2 virus, another subtype of the bird flu virus that has ravaged Europe. British Columbia had to do twice before with outbreaks of the same virus, although at that time both the low pathogenic (less contagious and less dangerous) variant.

CFIA praises the affected poultry farmers for their quick identification and then also rapid reporting. According to the organization that endorses this sector the importance of preventing further spread recognize and commit themselves to them and symptoms reported immediately.
by KIRSTEN GRAUMANS Dec 15, 2014

http://www.boerderij.nl/Pluimveehouderi ... -1665951W/

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 12:55 pm 
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Avian influenza has now been detected at a tenth farm in B.C.’s Fraser Valley.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has updated the list to include a Langley farm. That outbreak was confirmed over the weekend, affecting another 53 thousand birds. It brings the total to 233, 800 poultry that have died or will have to be destroyed.
The H5N2 strain of the disease was first identified on Dec. 1 in Chilliwack and Abbotsford.
Restrictions have been placed on the movement on poultry throughout that area, as well as by at least eight other countries or regions.

B.C industry officials say they’ll get help from Alberta and Manitoba producers this Christmas to make up for the shortfall of chickens and turkeys.

http://www.newstalk770.com/2014/12/15/48913/

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 2:30 pm 
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Tenth poultry farm tests positive for avian flu in B.C.
Posted Dec. 15th, 2014 by Mary MacArthur
Poultry in a 10th British Columbia farm have tested positive for avian influenza, bringing the total of poultry dead to 233,800 birds.

On Dec. 13, 53,000 birds from a table egg layer barn in Langley, B.C., tested positive for the highly virulent strain of H5N2 avian influenza.

This is the first time birds in Langley have tested positive. The first barn to have birds test positive for avian influenza was a broiler breeder facility in Chilliwack, B.C., Dec. 1. The rest of the barns have all been in Abbotsford.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is continuing its investigation. Identification of additional farms is not unexpected because of the highly contagious nature of the influenza.

As part of regular investigations, CFIA is tracking movement in and out of all the infected sites. CFIA placed a primary zone around most of southern B.C. to help control the disease and limit the export damage to the poultry industry across Canada.

So far, nine countries have placed partial or full bans on poultry from Canada.

Contact mary.macarthur@producer.com

http://www.producer.com/daily/tenth-pou ... lu-in-b-c/

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 2:33 pm 
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More cases of avian flu detected in B.C.

Total number of farms now at 10

By Diego Flammini, Farms.com

The avian flu outbreak in British Columbia continues as 10 farms are now confirmed to have birds infected with the H5N2 virus.

It’s estimated that more than 53,000 birds at the latest farm, in Langley B.C., are infected with the virus and are set to face euthanization or have already died because of it.

This comes after the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) confirmed a ninth farm in Abbotsford on Thursday, where about 7,000 chickens are affected.

These new findings push the number of dead birds or birds to be euthanized to more than 230,000 according to the CFIA.

The virus was first confirmed at a farm in Chilliwack on December 1st and as a result, Singapore, Mexico, South Africa, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, and the United States have placed restrictions or complete bans on poultry products from British Columbia and Canada.

http://www.farms.com/ag-industry-news/m ... c-327.aspx

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 2:37 pm 
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Table-egg layer barn in Langley, B.C., becomes 10th farm infected with avian flu


BY THE CANADIAN PRESS DECEMBER 15, 2014 9:52 AM



LANGLEY, B.C. - Federal officials say avian influenza has been detected at a tenth farm in B.C.'s Fraser Valley.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has updated its list to include a Langley, B.C., farm housing table-egg layers.

The outbreak in those barns was confirmed Saturday, affecting another 53,000 birds and hiking the total number of poultry to be destroyed up to 233,800.

The H5N2 strain of the disease was first identified on Dec. 1 in Chilliwack and Abbotsford, and has prompted the establishment of a control zone covering the southern half of B.C.

Restrictions have been placed on the movement on poultry throughout that area, as well as by at least eight other countries or regions.

The agency is overseeing the euthanization of chickens and turkeys on all the farms as inspectors continue searching for the cause of the outbreak.

http://www.theprovince.com/health/Table ... story.html

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 7:25 pm 
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Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/12151 ... fused.html

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 18, 2014 2:45 pm 
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Avian flu outbreak that started in Chilliwack crosses U.S. border
Image
Most of the western half of Chilliwack is in the CFIA's avian influenza restricted zone.— Image Credit: Paul J. Henderson
0
by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 18, 2014 at 9:00 AM
The Fraser Valley’s outbreak of avian influenza has now crossed the U.S. border and at least one American expert isn’t impressed with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) response.

Biomedical researcher Henry Niman is concerned the highly pathogenic strain will spread throughout North America as wild birds begin winter migration.

No poultry farms in the U.S. were impacted by Wednesday, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported Tuesday that the H5N2 strain found in Chilliwack, Abbotsford and now Langley has been detected in northern pintail ducks in Lynden, Wash., fewer than 15 kilometres from the Fraser Valley cluster.

“The finding in Whatcom County was quickly reported and identified due to increased surveillance for avian influenza in light of the [highly pathogenic] H5N2 avian influenza affecting commercial poultry in British Columbia, Canada,” said a USDA statement issued Dec. 16.

In addition, a highly pathogenic H5N8 strain was found in Washington in three captive falcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds.

Niman, who is president of Pittsburgh-based Recombinomics, analyzes viral evolution and the spread of disease.

“The wild birds really can’t be controlled, which is why this is a very big deal that could have a serious impact on poultry markets throughout the Americas,” Niman told the Times.

“Poultry farmers throughout North America should be worried.”

Niman says the CFIA is trying to “manage the message” and downplay concerns, releasing information too slowly, something that could have far-reaching consequences.

As of Wednesday morning, the CFIA had reported 10 farms in the Fraser Valley affected by the current outbreak. Approximately 233,800 chickens and turkeys have either died from the illness or been euthanized.

The first farm where avian flu was detected was a broiler breeder with 13,000 birds in Chilliwack, although no other farms in the city have been directly impacted by the outbreak. Eight of the other farms affected are in Abbotsford—three turkey and five broiler breeders.

The latest and the largest is a 53,000 table egg layer farm in Langley.

The CFIA did say Wednesday that the H5N8 was the first time a "Eurasian lineage highly pathogenic H5 virus has caused an outbreak of avian influenza in poultry in North America."

"The appearance of this particular reassortant virus is significant due to its ability to cause high mortality in domestic poultry," a Dec. 17 CFIA statement said.

No H5N2 illness has been reported in humans, but the CFIA said that as a precautionary measure, public health officials are monitoring workers who are exposed to affected poultry.

While the illness is not dangerous to people, and the outbreak is likely to have little or no impact on consumers, the industry is feeling the effects as a three-level disease control zone has been set up in the province. The largest primary control zone covers the entire southern half of the province from Highway 16 south. Then there is a restricted zone from that encompassing an area between three and 10 kilometres away from infected farms. Chilliwack residents may have seen signs identifying this zone on the eastern side of Vedder Road closer to the Vedder River. The highest restrictions are in the “infected” zone, the area within three kilometres from any known infected premises, which in Chilliwack means most of Greendale and Yarrow.

The CFIA did not respond to a request to comment on Niman’s suggestion they have under-reacted to the current outbreak.

“All of this will come out eventually and pretending it isn’t as big as it is doesn’t solve the problem,” Niman said. “Most of the spread will likely be through independent introductions by wild birds, which is very hard to control.”

http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/286246111.html

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 10:00 am 
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niman wrote:
Avian flu outbreak that started in Chilliwack crosses U.S. border
Image
Most of the western half of Chilliwack is in the CFIA's avian influenza restricted zone.— Image Credit: Paul J. Henderson
0
by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 18, 2014 at 9:00 AM
The Fraser Valley’s outbreak of avian influenza has now crossed the U.S. border and at least one American expert isn’t impressed with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) response.

Biomedical researcher Henry Niman is concerned the highly pathogenic strain will spread throughout North America as wild birds begin winter migration.

No poultry farms in the U.S. were impacted by Wednesday, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported Tuesday that the H5N2 strain found in Chilliwack, Abbotsford and now Langley has been detected in northern pintail ducks in Lynden, Wash., fewer than 15 kilometres from the Fraser Valley cluster.

“The finding in Whatcom County was quickly reported and identified due to increased surveillance for avian influenza in light of the [highly pathogenic] H5N2 avian influenza affecting commercial poultry in British Columbia, Canada,” said a USDA statement issued Dec. 16.

In addition, a highly pathogenic H5N8 strain was found in Washington in three captive falcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds.

Niman, who is president of Pittsburgh-based Recombinomics, analyzes viral evolution and the spread of disease.

“The wild birds really can’t be controlled, which is why this is a very big deal that could have a serious impact on poultry markets throughout the Americas,” Niman told the Times.

“Poultry farmers throughout North America should be worried.”

Niman says the CFIA is trying to “manage the message” and downplay concerns, releasing information too slowly, something that could have far-reaching consequences.

As of Wednesday morning, the CFIA had reported 10 farms in the Fraser Valley affected by the current outbreak. Approximately 233,800 chickens and turkeys have either died from the illness or been euthanized.

The first farm where avian flu was detected was a broiler breeder with 13,000 birds in Chilliwack, although no other farms in the city have been directly impacted by the outbreak. Eight of the other farms affected are in Abbotsford—three turkey and five broiler breeders.

The latest and the largest is a 53,000 table egg layer farm in Langley.

The CFIA did say Wednesday that the H5N8 was the first time a "Eurasian lineage highly pathogenic H5 virus has caused an outbreak of avian influenza in poultry in North America."

"The appearance of this particular reassortant virus is significant due to its ability to cause high mortality in domestic poultry," a Dec. 17 CFIA statement said.

No H5N2 illness has been reported in humans, but the CFIA said that as a precautionary measure, public health officials are monitoring workers who are exposed to affected poultry.

While the illness is not dangerous to people, and the outbreak is likely to have little or no impact on consumers, the industry is feeling the effects as a three-level disease control zone has been set up in the province. The largest primary control zone covers the entire southern half of the province from Highway 16 south. Then there is a restricted zone from that encompassing an area between three and 10 kilometres away from infected farms. Chilliwack residents may have seen signs identifying this zone on the eastern side of Vedder Road closer to the Vedder River. The highest restrictions are in the “infected” zone, the area within three kilometres from any known infected premises, which in Chilliwack means most of Greendale and Yarrow.

The CFIA did not respond to a request to comment on Niman’s suggestion they have under-reacted to the current outbreak.

“All of this will come out eventually and pretending it isn’t as big as it is doesn’t solve the problem,” Niman said. “Most of the spread will likely be through independent introductions by wild birds, which is very hard to control.”

http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/286246111.html

UPDATE: 11th farm hit with Avian flu, outbreak that started in Chilliwack enters U.S.

by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 18, 2014 at 9:00 AM— updated Dec 19, 2014 at 9:11 AM
The Fraser Valley’s outbreak of avian influenza has now crossed the U.S. border and at least one American expert isn’t impressed with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) response.

Biomedical researcher Henry Niman is concerned the highly pathogenic strain will spread throughout North America as wild birds begin winter migration.

No poultry farms in the U.S. were impacted by Wednesday, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported Tuesday that the H5N2 strain found in Chilliwack, Abbotsford and now Langley has been detected in northern pintail ducks in Lynden, Wash., fewer than 15 kilometres from the Fraser Valley cluster.

“The finding in Whatcom County was quickly reported and identified due to increased surveillance for avian influenza in light of the [highly pathogenic] H5N2 avian influenza affecting commercial poultry in British Columbia, Canada,” said a USDA statement issued Dec. 16.

In addition, a highly pathogenic H5N8 strain was found in Washington in three captive falcons that were fed hunter-killed wild birds.

Niman, who is president of Pittsburgh-based Recombinomics, analyzes viral evolution and the spread of disease.

“The wild birds really can’t be controlled, which is why this is a very big deal that could have a serious impact on poultry markets throughout the Americas,” Niman told the Times.

“Poultry farmers throughout North America should be worried.”

Niman says the CFIA is trying to “manage the message” and downplay concerns, releasing information too slowly, something that could have far-reaching consequences.

As of Friday morning, the CFIA had reported 11 farms in the Fraser Valley affected by the current outbreak. Approximately 245,600 chickens and turkeys have either died from the illness or been euthanized.

The first farm where avian flu was detected was a broiler breeder with 13,000 birds in Chilliwack, although no other farms in the city have been directly impacted by the outbreak. Eight of the other farms affected are in Abbotsford—three turkey and five broiler breeders.

The 10th and largest was a 53,000 table egg layer farm in Langley on Dec. 13. Then on Dec. 17, a second Langley farm, a 11,800-chicken broiler breeder was added to the list.

The CFIA said Wednesday that the H5N8 was the first time a "Eurasian lineage highly pathogenic H5 virus has caused an outbreak of avian influenza in poultry in North America."

"The appearance of this particular reassortant virus is significant due to its ability to cause high mortality in domestic poultry," a Dec. 17 CFIA statement said.

No H5N2 illness has been reported in humans, but the CFIA said that as a precautionary measure, public health officials are monitoring workers who are exposed to affected poultry.

In response to questions from Niman that the CFIA has not acted quickly enough, a spokesperson said the agency "is committed to sharing new information related to the avian influenza situation in a timely manner. The Agency regularly posts updates to the web via the Infected Premises Table, the Timeline of Events, and online statements."

CFIA agrees that wild birds are a problem since they cannot be controlled, which is why biosecurity on farms plays a "very important role."

"Wild birds are certainly a serious concern regarding the spread of this disease as wild birds are natural reservoirs of influenza viruses and have natural migration pathways," the agency said.

The CFIA has not detected either H5N2 or H5N8 in wild birds anywhere in Canada in 2014.

While the illness is not dangerous to people, and the outbreak is likely to have little or no impact on consumers, the industry is feeling the effects as a three-level disease control zone has been set up in the province. The largest primary control zone covers the entire southern half of the province from Highway 16 south. Then there is a restricted zone from that encompassing an area between three and 10 kilometres away from infected farms. Chilliwack residents may have seen signs identifying this zone on the eastern side of Vedder Road closer to the Vedder River. The highest restrictions are in the “infected” zone, the area within three kilometres from any known infected premises, which in Chilliwack means most of Greendale and Yarrow.

“All of this will come out eventually and pretending it isn’t as big as it is doesn’t solve the problem,” Niman said. “Most of the spread will likely be through independent introductions by wild birds, which is very hard to control.”

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