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PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 12:02 pm 
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Avian flu found at two more farms in Fraser Valley
Two more Fraser Valley farms and a barn near an already quarantined poultry farm have been added to the list of infected properites.

LANGLEY ADVANCE
DECEMBER 10, 2014 05:49 PM

Two more Fraser Valley farms and a barn near an already quarantined poultry farm have been added to the list of infected properites.
A total of 155,000 birds are on the infected eight properties.
Culling of birds in infected farms started earlier this month.
On Dec. 8, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) established a primary control zone in the area where the disease has been identified.
The province and the poultry industry support this decision and are working together with the CFIA to implement it.
Avian influenza is highly contagious between birds and can spread rapidly. Because southern British Columbia has a high concentration of poultry operations, the primary control zone covers an area beyond the premises that are currently affected.
The primary control zone is bordered on the west by the Pacific Ocean, on the south by the United States border, on the north by Highway 16, and on the east by the border between British Columbia and Alberta. A map is available on the CFIA website.
The primary control zone is divided into three disease control zones: infected, restricted and security. The three zones represent relative levels of risk and movement restrictions vary accordingly. Most of the restrictions apply to the infected and restricted zones because of the greater potential that the virus can spread.
Within the primary control zone, there are three disease control sub-zones: infected, restricted and security.
* The outer boundary of an infected zone is up to 3 km from any known infected premises.
* The restricted zone is established surrounding the infected zone and measured based on the epidemiology of the disease in order to prevent the spread of avian influenza (3 km to 10 km).
* The security zone is the remainder of the primary control zone (beyond 10 km).
The movement restrictions apply to:
* captive birds (including but not limited to poultry, fowl and pet birds);
* poultry products or by-products;
* anything that has been exposed to captive birds (which could include but is not limited to feed, vehicles, equipment or clothing).
All movement of captive birds in and out of, and through this zone is strictly controlled and requires a permit from the CFIA. The movement restrictions also apply to poultry products and by-products and material that has come into contact with captive birds.
Avian influenza viruses do not pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked. Avian influenza rarely affects humans that do not have consistent contact with infected birds. Public health authorities stand ready to take precautionary measures as warranted.
Poultry farmers are urged to take an active role in protecting their flocks by employing strict biosecurity measures on their property, and immediately reporting any suspicious symptoms to the CFIA.
For more information on avian influenza and measures poultry farmers can take to protect their flocks, visit the CFIA web site at inspection.gc.ca.

- See more at: http://www.langleyadvance.com/news/avia ... YGqXj.dpuf

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 12:06 pm 
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Two more Fraser Valley farms test positive for avian flu
Seven farms in total have tested positive
Jill Drews and Anita Bathe December 10, 2014 1:16 pm

FRASER VALLEY (NEWS1130) – Two more Fraser Valley poultry farms have tested positive for avian flu.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says both of these farms are within 3 km of the infected zone in Abbotsford.

A total of seven farms have tested positive and several countries have banned import of our products.

Dr. Harpreet Kochhar adds another barn on one of the previously infected sites has tested positive for the virus. “As this barn is legally considered a separate business entity, we are treating it as a new infected premise. This brings the total of infected premises to eight.”

He says another farm is suspected of also having avian influenza and is being tested.

There are now 155,000 birds that are either dead or set to be euthanized.

http://www.news1130.com/2014/12/10/two- ... avian-flu/

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 1:07 pm 
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Opinion: Industrialization of livestock farming to blame for avian flu outbreak


BY PETER FRICKER, SPECIAL TO THE VANCOUVER SUN DECEMBER 9, 2014

Opinion: Industrialization of livestock farming to blame for avian flu outbreak
Image
Turkeys and broiler chickens (raised for meat) are often confined in giant barns containing thousands of birds, with densities as high as 20 birds per square metre, all eating, sleeping and defecating in the same barn.
Photograph by: LM Otero , AP
The appearance of avian flu in the Fraser Valley — the fourth such outbreak in 10 years — is just one symptom of the inexorable rise of factory farming, with its attendant risks to animal welfare, human health and the environment.

Thousands of chickens and turkeys are again wiped out by a virulent disease, and thousands more must be destroyed to prevent its spread. Public health officials again must closely monitor a deadly virus affecting poultry to ensure it doesn’t pose a threat to humans.

Since the massive avian flu outbreak in 2004, during which 17 million birds were culled, various biosecurity measures have been put in place by the poultry industry. Yet, still the virus, in one strain or another, emerges with frightening persistence.

Why? Often the finger is pointed at migratory birds because they carry and shed the virus. But this has always been the case, and wild birds have always had contact with domestic poultry. What has changed is the way poultry are raised. Now, turkeys and broiler chickens (raised for meat) are confined in giant barns containing thousands of birds, with densities as high as 20 birds per square metre, all eating, sleeping and defecating in the same barn.

The numbers and density of modern poultry operations provide perfect conditions for the spread of viruses. Worst of all, they create opportunities for a low-pathogenic virus to become high-pathogenic, as a virus infecting a crowded barn of thousands of genetically identical birds has a greater chance to mutate into a more virulent form. As Earl Brown, a University of Ottawa microbiology professor specializing in flu virus evolution, has stated: “It is high-density chicken farming that gives rise to high-virulent influenza viruses.”

It is not only the density within the Fraser Valley’s poultry barns that is a problem, it’s also the number of barns within the valley. In 2004, an official with the B.C. agriculture ministry advised that the best way to protect the poultry industry from another avian flu outbreak was to move millions of birds out of the densely packed industry in the valley. In an email obtained by media he said: “The B.C. poultry industry needs to investigate a risk-management strategy to move to locations outside the Fraser Valley.” This has not happened, leaving greater risk of farm-to-farm transmission of viruses.

Most consumers are probably unaware of the fundamental changes in animal agriculture that have created an industry dependent on economies of scale, biosecurity, antibiotics and genetically uniform animals. Small-scale livestock farming using traditional husbandry has virtually disappeared from the valley, replaced by bigger farms with more animals. The animals are not in green fields or in the little red barns portrayed in the marketing and packaging of farm products. They are confined in huge, crowded sheds where they never see the light of day and their welfare is compromised.

Broiler chickens and turkeys, for example, are bred for fast growth, causing them to develop painfully weakened bones and lameness from rapid weight gain. In 1950, it took 84 days for a broiler to reach market weight. Today, it takes 38-days. The University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture estimates if you grew as fast as a chicken, you would weigh 349 pounds at age two. The animal pays the price for such efficiency.

There is also an environmental cost associated with intensive farming in the Fraser Valley. The poultry industry alone produces hundreds of thousands of cubic yards of excess manure along with significant levels of ammonia, contributing to air and water pollution in the region. Globally, livestock production is estimated to contribute 14.5 per cent of all human-caused greenhouse gases, more than all forms of transportation combined.

The risks associated with avian flu outbreaks are risks created by the industrialization of livestock farming. It is just another reason the worldwide growth of factory farming needs to be stopped, our food system re-examined, and our unsustainable meat and dairy-centred diets reconsidered.

Peter Fricker is projects and communications director at the Vancouver Humane Society.

http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/op- ... story.html

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 12, 2014 6:02 pm 
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Fujian confirmed

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/12121 ... irmed.html

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 9:18 am 
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How Bird Flu Is Threatening Vancouver Christmas Dinners
By Jen Skerritt
December 15, 2014 7:00 AM EST
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Poultry processors in British Columbia are striving to find enough turkeys for Christmas tables after avian influenza wiped out thousands of birds destined for the holiday feast.
Suppliers in Canada’s westernmost province are bringing in birds from other parts of the country to “make sure that no Christmas table will be without a turkey,” said Michel Benoit, general manager of Vancouver-based BC Turkey Farmers.
The outbreak, which prompted bans on British Columbia poultry from eight countries, has claimed 34,000 turkeys slated for Christmas consumption. The losses so far represent about 10 percent of holiday consumption .
“They were going to be Christmas turkeys,” Benoit said in a telephone interview. “It is a big loss.”
For farmers like Calvin Breukelman, 47, who lost a flock of 12,000 birds when a different strain of the virus hit his farm in the province’s Fraser Valley in 2004, the spread of the illness is a nerve-wracking prospect.
“It’s nervous times right now,” said Breukelman, who’s director of the B.C. Broiler Hatching Egg Commission. “The virus is a lot more virulent, it’s stronger and the risk of spreading is a lot higher.”
The disease, which so far has killed turkeys on three farms in the Fraser Valley in past weeks, spreads rapidly and may be identified on other locations in coming days, Harpreet Kochhar, chief veterinary officer at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, said on a Dec. 10 conference call. A control zone is restricting movement of birds where the virus was identified, he said.
‘Highly Contagious’
“This identification of additional farms is not unexpected given that avian influenza is highly contagious,” Kochhar said.
Chickens are also succumbing to the virus. All told, about 155,000 birds in the Fraser Valley died of flu or are set to be euthanized with carbon dioxide gas and then composted after avian influenza was detected at eight sites.
The U.S., Taiwan and South Africa are among countries that have imposed temporary restrictions on poultry from British Columbia, the third-largest turkey-producing province in Canada.
The H5N2 strain of avian flu detected at two of the farms has a high death rate among birds, according to a government statement. Cases of a less severe strain were reported in British Columbia in 2009 and in Manitoba in 2010.
The province will probably need to import as many as 3 million broiler hatching eggs from the U.S. in 2015 to offset losses from avian flu, Breukelman, the farmer, said.
Holiday Shortfall
Sofina Foods, British Columbia’s largest turkey processor, has covered its holiday shortfall with birds from eastern Canada and the U.S., said Jeff McDowell, vice-president of the company’s poultry value chain. Demand for turkeys peaks between Thanksgiving and Christmas, when 80 percent of consumption occurs, he said.
“It was a bit of a challenge for us to source product, but we were able to do it,” McDowell said by phone from the company’s processing facility in Abbotsford, southeast of Vancouver. While no further shortfalls are expected, there are concerns “tomorrow there could be an outbreak at another farm.”
Benoit of BC Turkey Farmers expects the efforts to bring in turkeys from elsewhere should suffice to prevent any shortage.
Deadly Silence
Chickens on infected farms showed classic symptoms of avian influenza -- their heads were so swollen their eyes were closed, their lungs were full of inflammation and congestion, and there were small hemorrhages throughout the body and on their shins, said Jane Pritchard, chief veterinary officer for British Columbia’s agriculture ministry.
The turkeys died suddenly, and there were no immediate signs pointing to what killed them, she said.
“It’s called the cathedral effect,” Pritchard said on a Dec. 4 conference call. “Usually when you walk into the flock it’s quite busy and noisy, but with avian influenza you walk in and it’s silent.”
To contact the reporter on this story: Jen Skerritt in Winnipeg at jskerritt1@bloomberg.net
To contact the editors responsible for this story: Millie Munshi at mmunshi@bloomberg.net Carlos Caminada, Joe Richter

http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2014-1 ... nners.html

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2014 9:21 am 
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niman wrote:
How Bird Flu Is Threatening Vancouver Christmas Dinners
By Jen Skerritt
December 15, 2014 7:00 AM EST
facebook twitter Share on Linked In save Tap 'Save' to
read later
Poultry processors in British Columbia are striving to find enough turkeys for Christmas tables after avian influenza wiped out thousands of birds destined for the holiday feast.
Suppliers in Canada’s westernmost province are bringing in birds from other parts of the country to “make sure that no Christmas table will be without a turkey,” said Michel Benoit, general manager of Vancouver-based BC Turkey Farmers.
The outbreak, which prompted bans on British Columbia poultry from eight countries, has claimed 34,000 turkeys slated for Christmas consumption. The losses so far represent about 10 percent of holiday consumption .
“They were going to be Christmas turkeys,” Benoit said in a telephone interview. “It is a big loss.”
For farmers like Calvin Breukelman, 47, who lost a flock of 12,000 birds when a different strain of the virus hit his farm in the province’s Fraser Valley in 2004, the spread of the illness is a nerve-wracking prospect.
“It’s nervous times right now,” said Breukelman, who’s director of the B.C. Broiler Hatching Egg Commission. “The virus is a lot more virulent, it’s stronger and the risk of spreading is a lot higher.”
The disease, which so far has killed turkeys on three farms in the Fraser Valley in past weeks, spreads rapidly and may be identified on other locations in coming days, Harpreet Kochhar, chief veterinary officer at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, said on a Dec. 10 conference call. A control zone is restricting movement of birds where the virus was identified, he said.
‘Highly Contagious’
“This identification of additional farms is not unexpected given that avian influenza is highly contagious,” Kochhar said.
Chickens are also succumbing to the virus. All told, about 155,000 birds in the Fraser Valley died of flu or are set to be euthanized with carbon dioxide gas and then composted after avian influenza was detected at eight sites.
The U.S., Taiwan and South Africa are among countries that have imposed temporary restrictions on poultry from British Columbia, the third-largest turkey-producing province in Canada.
The H5N2 strain of avian flu detected at two of the farms has a high death rate among birds, according to a government statement. Cases of a less severe strain were reported in British Columbia in 2009 and in Manitoba in 2010.
The province will probably need to import as many as 3 million broiler hatching eggs from the U.S. in 2015 to offset losses from avian flu, Breukelman, the farmer, said.
Holiday Shortfall
Sofina Foods, British Columbia’s largest turkey processor, has covered its holiday shortfall with birds from eastern Canada and the U.S., said Jeff McDowell, vice-president of the company’s poultry value chain. Demand for turkeys peaks between Thanksgiving and Christmas, when 80 percent of consumption occurs, he said.
“It was a bit of a challenge for us to source product, but we were able to do it,” McDowell said by phone from the company’s processing facility in Abbotsford, southeast of Vancouver. While no further shortfalls are expected, there are concerns “tomorrow there could be an outbreak at another farm.”
Benoit of BC Turkey Farmers expects the efforts to bring in turkeys from elsewhere should suffice to prevent any shortage.
Deadly Silence
Chickens on infected farms showed classic symptoms of avian influenza -- their heads were so swollen their eyes were closed, their lungs were full of inflammation and congestion, and there were small hemorrhages throughout the body and on their shins, said Jane Pritchard, chief veterinary officer for British Columbia’s agriculture ministry.
The turkeys died suddenly, and there were no immediate signs pointing to what killed them, she said.
“It’s called the cathedral effect,” Pritchard said on a Dec. 4 conference call. “Usually when you walk into the flock it’s quite busy and noisy, but with avian influenza you walk in and it’s silent.”
To contact the reporter on this story: Jen Skerritt in Winnipeg at jskerritt1@bloomberg.net
To contact the editors responsible for this story: Millie Munshi at mmunshi@bloomberg.net Carlos Caminada, Joe Richter

http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2014-1 ... nners.html

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-1 ... as-dinners

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