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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 5:41 pm 
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Media reports note that in addition to the two farms with confirmed HPAI H5N2, two additional farms are H5 confirmed.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 5:42 pm 
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VANCOUVER – The federal government has confirmed the type of avian flu that has infected poultry at two British Columbia farms, while also saying birds at two additional farms are also infected.

Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, Canada’s chief veterinary officer, says test results indicate birds at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a chicken farm in Chilliwack were infected with high-pathogenic H5N2 avian flu.

He says further testing at two other nearby farms that received chickens from the Chilliwack site have been confirmed H5 avian flu.

There have been three previous outbreaks in Canada involving the low-path strain of H5N2 — two in B.C. and one in Manitoba.

Officials have cautioned that the virus does not pose a risk to consumers if poultry meat is properly handled and cooked, though in rare cases it can be transmitted to people who work in close contact with the animals.

Several markets in Asia have imposed restrictions on Canadian or B.C. poultry.

http://globalnews.ca/news/1707760/tests ... u-as-h5n2/

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 6:29 pm 
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Avian influenza confirmed at third and fourth farms in Abbotsford and Chilliwack
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Canadian Food Inspection Agency workers are on scene at an Abbotsford turkey farm quarantined after the discovery of avian flu.— Image Credit: Tyler Olsen
posted Dec 4, 2014 at 2:00 PM
Officials investigating an outbreak of avian influenza at four Fraser Valley poultry farms gained several key pieces of information this week as they seek to stop the virus in its tracks.

The outbreak, which has already killed thousands of birds at farms in Abbotsford and Chilliwack, has been identified as a highly pathogenic (or "high path") H5N2 strain with a three- to five-day incubation period, officials announced Thursday.

"It is very contagious and showing high mortality amongst the poultry population," said CFIA's chief veterinary officer, Dr. Harpreet Kochhar on Thursday.

They also confirmed that preliminary test results from two broiler breeder chicken farms quarantined Wednesday had been deemed "presumptive positive" for the virus and the chickens will be euthanized.

On Tuesday, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) announced avian influenza had been detected at farms in Abbotsford and Chilliwack eight kilometres apart, following a large number of bird deaths at the two sites over the weekend.

By the following afternoon, the majority of the 11,000 turkeys that had come in contact with the virus had died. Of the 7,000 chickens affected, 1,000 had died by Tuesday. The rest will be destroyed, as will 17,000 healthy birds in two adjacent barns at the turkey farm.

"It's a big impact to the families and the farms," said Dr. Jane Pritchard, chief veterinarian officer with the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture.

The newly quarantined farms are located between the original two locations. One is located in Abbotsford, the other is in Chilliwack. Both received birds last Friday from the Chilliwack chicken farm, prior to the discovery of avian influenza there earlier this week.

While several Asian countries have placed restrictions on poultry imports from Canada, health officials and industry representatives have stressed that the virus does not pose a substantial danger to humans, even those who come in direct contact with it.

"It's safe to eat turkeys, chickens and eggs," said BC Poultry Association president Ray Nickel. Birds heading to market from farms within the surveillance zone will be tested for the virus, he added.

Humans who do not have consistent contact with infected birds are not at risk, and even when the virus does transfer to humans, the symptoms are mild, Kochar said.

There have been at least two recent previous outbreaks of the H5N2 strain in Canada, but both of those were of a low-path version of the virus.

In 2010, 8,200 birds were culled when the virus was found at a Manitoba turkey breeder. And in 2009, the discovery of a low path version of the virus on two farms led to the destruction of some 72,000 birds.

The 2004 avian flu outbreak that led to the slaughter of 17 million birds in the Fraser Valley was a highly pathogenic H7N3 strain.

Pritchard also expressed confidence that the outbreak will be contained, noting that the high path characteristic of the disease ensures it will not go undetected.

"When it hits, it hits hard and we're going to be able to find it," she said. "Our current focus is going farm by farm … to see if there's any spread."

Pritchard credited said the poultry industry for taking the initiative after the virus was identified on the farms and said the industry and the province has learned from past experiences with animal diseases, including the 2004 outbreak.

At its East Abbotsford location, the CFIA has established a joint emergency operations centre, with officials from both the provincial and federal governments working together to contain the virus. Pritchard said personnel have poured into the centre in recent days to the point where they are running out of space.

Compensation is available to the farmers affected, but it won't fully cover the costs stemming from the flu both for the poultry farms where the virus was found and dozens of nearby operations in what could be a three-kilometre surveillance zone around the affected sites.

On Wednesday, several Asian countries announced restrictions on the importation of poultry products.

Hong Kong announced that it had banned poultry meat and eggs from the Fraser Valley following the discovery of avian flu at farms in Chilliwack and Abbotsford. The city has also recently banned poultry products from the Netherlands and the United Kingdom following H5N8 avian flu outbreaks in those countries.

South Korea, Japan and Taiwan have also imposed restrictions on poultry products from B.C. or Canada.

http://www.abbynews.com/news/284804851.html

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 6:54 pm 
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Avian Influenza in the Fraser Valley
On the week of Dec. 1, 2014, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) reported that H5N2 has been identified as the strain of avian influenza virus that has infected four poultry farms in the central Fraser Valley, resulting in significant mortality to the birds. These farms have been quarantined by the CFIA and further testing is being done to characterize the virus. Remaining birds at the affected farms are to be culled to limit potential spread to other farms. It is possible that at some point, more farms may be affected..

At present, no human cases of H5N2 influenza virus have been identified. Fraser Health Public Health is working with the CFIA in responding to this event by contacting individuals who have been on the affected farms during the previous week to assess their risk of exposure and monitor contacts’ health going forward. Contacts will also be offered this year’s seasonal influenza vaccine. Although this will not protect against an H5N2 strain of avian influenza, it will reduce the risk of misinterpretation of influenza-like illness due to infection with influenza strains covered by this year’s vaccine Oseltamivir treatment will be recommended for any individuals with recent exposure to live poultry on the affected farms who develop signs and symptoms of influenza-like illness.

Ongoing public health surveillance will help clarify the risk of illness in persons who have had direct contact with affected poultry and, should contacts develop influenza illness, the risk of potential person-to-person transmission.

Patients presenting to a health care setting with influenza-like illness should be asked about direct exposure to poultry livestock. Patients without a history of recent farm exposure to live poultry in the central Fraser valley area are unlikely to be infected with the H5 strain of avian influenza virus and can be managed in the customary manner.

If a patient with influenza-like illness presents indicating recent exposure to poultry on a farm in the Fraser Valley, please immediately report this to your local health unit. Please collect nasal and nasopharyngeal viral swabs (and conjunctival swabs, if clinically appropriate). As well, acute serology for influenza prior to commencing any antiviral treatment. Please be sure to make arrangements with the community laboratory beforehand and ensure that the patient is wearing a mask when attending the laboratory to prevent exposure of others. It is prudent for you and your staff to uses personal protective equipment for respiratory droplet precautions when dealing with symptomatic patients.

Please ensure that you have a small stock of viral swabs on hand. The order form for the swabs can be found at the BCCDC website. When sending samples to the lab mark all specimens and lab requisitions “AVIAN INFLUENZA” and ask the lab to arrange for immediate transport to BCCDC lab for processing.

Further Fraser Health updates will be forthcoming. Please contact your local Medical Health Officer should you have any questions.

The Fraser Health Medical Health Officers are available for medical consultations and can be reached at 604-587-3828 or 1-877-342-6467 (in Fraser East). To page MHO on-call after hours: 604-527-4806

http://physicians.fraserhealth.ca/?sect ... py_id=9308

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 7:15 pm 
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Avian flu confirmed at four Fraser Valley farms after testing
Virus does not pose a risk to humans if properly handled
The Canadian Press Posted: Dec 04, 2014 2:16 PM PT Last Updated: Dec 04, 2014 2:19 PM PT

Image
Farms affected by the avian flu outbreak are under tightened biosecurity measures. (CBC)

The federal government has confirmed the type of avian flu that has infected poultry at two Fraser Valley farms, while also saying birds at two additional farms are also infected.

Avian flu detected at 2 Fraser Valley poultry farms
Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, Canada's chief veterinary officer, says test results indicate birds at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a chicken farm in Chilliwack were infected with high-pathogenic H5N2 avian flu.

He says further testing at two other nearby farms that received chickens from the Chilliwack site have been confirmed H5 avian flu.

There have been three previous outbreaks in Canada involving the low-path strain of H5N2 — two in B.C. and one in Manitoba.

Officials have cautioned that the virus does not pose a risk to consumers if poultry meat is properly handled and cooked, though in rare cases it can be transmitted to people who work in close contact with the animals.

Thousands of turkeys, chickens, and eggs are being destroyed at the farms in Abbotsford and Chilliwack and the farmers will be compensated.


Avian flu chicken AP
An H5 influenza outbreak in B.C.'s Fraser Valley has led to the quarantine of four farms and death of thousands of chickens and turkeys. (Associated Press)

The B.C. Poultry Association has said it's confident biosecurity measures will be able to stop the spread of avian flu in the region.

No human has become ill from H5 influenza outbreak, according to public health officials.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-c ... -1.2860607

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 7:19 pm 
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Avian influenza in Fraser Valley confirmed as H5N2 virus
OTTAWA, December 4, 2014

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)'s testing at the National Centre for Foreign Animal Diseases has confirmed the strain causing the avian influenza outbreak on two farms in the Fraser Valley as a highly-pathogenic H5N2 virus.

The Province of British Columbia has informed the CFIA that preliminary test results from the two additional farms that were quarantined yesterday are presumptive positive for H5 avian influenza. The CFIA will conduct further confirmatory testing.

Avian influenza viruses do not pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked. Avian influenza rarely affects humans that do not have consistent contact with infected birds. Any illness would be mild. Public health authorities are ready to take precautionary measures as required.

H5N2 is a subtype that is known to affect wild and domestic birds. A highly pathogenic virus causes severe illness and death in birds, particularly poultry, whereas a low pathogenic virus causes less severe illness and lower rates or mortality.

A low-pathogenic H5N2 avian influenza virus caused outbreaks in Manitoba in 2010 and British Columbia in 2009.

All birds on the infected premises will be humanely euthanized in the coming days, under CFIA supervision. When animals affected by a disease are ordered destroyed by the CFIA under the Health of Animals Act, the farmer is also informed that they will receive compensation. The CFIA is dedicated to working directly with affected producers so that the compensation process runs as smoothly as possible.

As the CFIA's investigation progresses, any additional control measures will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

Poultry farmers are reminded to practice a high level of biosecurity to reduce the risk of disease spread, and report any suspicious symptoms in their flocks to the CFIA.

Contact:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Media Relations
613-773-6600

http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid ... um=twitter

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 10:43 pm 
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Tests confirm high-path H5N2 in British Columbia poultry
Filed Under: Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)
Jim Wappes | Editorial Director | CIDRAP News | Dec 04, 2014

Canadian health officials today confirmed highly pathogenic H5N2 avian flu in two of the four H5-related poultry outbreaks in British Columbia's Fraser Valley near Vancouver, one of several evolving stories on avian flu outbreaks around the world.

Harpreet Kochhar, DVM, PhD, Canada's chief veterinary officer, said in a press briefing today that test results on turkeys at a farm in Abbotsford and on chickens at a farm in Chilliwack confirmed highly pathogenic H5N2. Two other farms, also in Abbotsford and Chilliwack, that received chickens from the first Chilliwack farm have birds that tested positive for H5; they await confirmatory testing on the exact strain.

"The Canadian Food Inspection Agency's [CFIA's] testing at the National Centre for Foreign Animal Diseases has confirmed the strain causing the avian influenza outbreak on two farms in the Fraser Valley as a highly pathogenic H5N2 virus," Kochhar said.

Authorities in the Netherlands, meanwhile, have reported a fifth outbreak of H5N8 in domestic birds, while India is combatting a third outbreak of H5N1 in poultry.

Confirmatory tests awaited for 2 farms
"The Province of British Columbia has informed the CFIA that preliminary test results from the two additional farms that were quarantined yesterday are presumptive positive for H5 avian influenza," Kochhar noted. "The CFIA will conduct further confirmatory testing."

The CFIA yesterday placed the third and fourth farms under quarantine and said the agency in the coming days will cull and dispose of all birds on the affected farms. A news release yesterday from the CFIA said it will compensate farmers for lost poultry, paying $20 for a non-breeding chicken, $1,200 for a breeding chicken, $70 for a turkey, and $1,050 for a breeding turkey.

The agency said other compensation might also be available. All farms are within about 5 miles of each other.

Jane Pritchard, DVM, chief veterinary officer with British Columbia's Ministry of Agriculture, said at the press conference that the H5 findings in the additional farms were not surprising. "These results were expected based on the tracing of bird movement from one of the original farms," she said.

"It was great work on the ground that predicted the likelihood that these farms would be positive and led to the precautionary quarantine on farms 3 and 4. Through due diligence we were ahead of the game on this."

She added that officials have not detected other unusual losses of poultry on other Fraser Valley farms or symptoms of avian flu in birds. CFIA and British Columbia authorities are going from farm to farm to monitor for further outbreaks.

Pritchard said the disease is unlikely to go undetected because of its impact on birds. "We think that it's about a 3- to 5-day incubation period. And we also know that if it hits, the [poultry] producer isn't going to miss it."

In a report posted by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) yesterday, officials specified that the outbreak at the initially affected farm in Chilliwack was restricted to one of three barns. In the affected barn, all 700 of the 24-week-old chickens died from H5N2.

One adjacent unaffected barn contains 47-week-old chickens, while the other contains 1-week-old pullets. The farm housed 7,000 poultry before the outbreak.

Pritchard said that at the Abbotsford turkey farm, the "vast majority" of 11,000 turkeys died from H5N2. The remainder in the barn will be culled, as will flocks of about 3,000 and 14,000 in other barns, she added.

Signs of mutation
Canada has experienced low-pathogenic H5N2 outbreaks in British Columbia in 2005 and 2009 and in Manitoba in 2010, but this appears to be the first outbreak of highly pathogenic H5N2 in the country.

In response to a question, Kochhar said the change "is reflective that these viruses are actively mutating." He said the high-path designation means the virus is both highly contagious and produces high mortality in domestic birds.

When asked if the outbreak is showing signs of being contained, Kochhar said it's still in its early stages. Pritchard added, "Our intention is to come out of this quickly and get back to normal as soon as possible."

Fifth Dutch H5N8 outbreak
In the Netherlands, a second outbreak of H5N8 avian flu in Kamperveen, within a kilometer of a previously affected farm, has brought that country's H5N8 outbreak total to five, according to a report filed with the OIE yesterday.

Of 14,600 birds on the farm, 100 contracted the virus, but none fatally. To stamp out the outbreak, however, all poultry on the farm were culled.

The report also confirmed the fourth outbreak, which was reported by the media on Dec 1. It involved 28,000 layer and breeding hens on a farm in Zoeterwoude, in South Holland province, 25 of which became infected. As noted in the media, all chickens on the farm were destroyed.

In response to the recent H5N8 outbreaks in the Netherlands, Germany, and the United Kingdom, the OIE today issued a statement calling for better disease surveillance and control in animals.

"To date, the H5N8 strain has not been linked to any cases in humans," the OIE said. "Nevertheless, it is important to remain on the alert given the capacity of influenza viruses to mutate. With 75% of human emerging diseases being derived from pathogens transmitted by animals, whether domestic or wild, public health protection is inextricably linked to the preservation of animal health.

"The OIE issues a reminder that poor management of disease control at source in animals, irrespective of whether diseases are potentially transmissible to humans, can have consequences that are often severe for the local population and economy, and even at a regional and global level," the agency added.

Third H5N1 outbreak in India
India, meanwhile, has confirmed a third outbreak of H5N1 avian flu in a week, according to another OIE report.

The outbreak, in Alappuzha in Kerala state on the southwestern tip of the country, killed 2,554 ducks in a village flock of 138,063 ducks. An additional 26,746 birds were culled.

The previous outbreaks were in the same region of Kerala. One affected a flock of 228,907 ducks, and the second a flock of 13,000 ducks. All three outbreaks began on Nov 20, with different reporting dates.

See also:

Dec 4 CFIA news release

Dec 3 CFIA news release

Dec 3 OIE report on Canadian outbreaks

Dec 3 OIE report on Dutch H5N8 outbreak

Dec 4 OIE statement on H5N8 and animal surveillance

Dec 3 OIE report on H5N1 outbreak in India

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspect ... ia-poultry

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 12:09 am 
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Commentary

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/12051 ... ser_4.html

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 12:10 am 
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Map updated with precise location of Chilliwack index farm

https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit? ... 0Jt6F7NlIM

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2014 11:25 am 
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Information received on 03/12/2014 from Dr Martine Dubuc, OIE Delegate for Canada, Chief Food Safety Officer Vice-President, Science Branch, Health Ministry, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Canada
Summary
Report type Immediate notification
Date of start of the event 30/11/2014
Date of pre-confirmation of the event 01/12/2014
Report date 03/12/2014
Date submitted to OIE 03/12/2014
Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence 01/2008
Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
Causal agent Avian influenza virus
Serotype H5
Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to the whole country
New outbreaks (2)
Outbreak 1 (BC-2014-NAI-002) Abbotsford, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Date of start of the outbreak 30/11/2014
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 11000 7700 7700 0 0
Affected population BC-2014-NAI-002 Meat turkey farm Affected barn: 83 days of age toms In addition, 14,000 2 week old poults and 3,000 hens are kept on the same premises with normal mortality rate.
Outbreak 2 (BC-2014-NAI-001) Chilliwack, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Date of start of the outbreak 30/11/2014
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 7000 700 700 0 0
Affected population BC-2014-NAI-001 Chicken broiler breeder farm. The affected barn holds a flock of 24 weeks of age. An adjacent barn on the same farm, has a flock of 4500 hens and 300 males with normal mortality rates.
Summary of outbreaks Total outbreaks: 2
Total animals affected
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 18000 8400 8400 0 0
Outbreak statistics
Species Apparent morbidity rate Apparent mortality rate Apparent case fatality rate Proportion susceptible animals lost*
Birds 46.67% 46.67% 100.00% 46.67%
*Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
Epidemiology
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
Unknown or inconclusive
Epidemiological comments Important note: Although this event is reported as highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), full subtyping and pathogenicity index (IVPI) are not yet completed. Reporting as HPAI is based on preliminary testing and clinical signs. Sudden high mortality (10% in outbreak in Chilliwack and 50% in outbreak in Abbotsford) within 24-48 hrs. Preliminary testing done at the British Columbia Provincial Laboratory indicates presence of H5 avian influenza virus. Additional testing currently underway at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease (NCFAD).
Control measures
Measures applied
Quarantine
Vaccination prohibited
No treatment of affected animals
Measures to be applied
Stamping out
Movement control inside the country
Screening
Zoning
Disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory name and type Species Test Test date Result
Animal Health Centre, British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture (Local laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 01/12/2014 Positive
Future Reporting
The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid ... rtid=16660

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