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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 4:10 pm 
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Tests confirm avian influenza strain at B.C. farms as H5N2: source
By: James Keller, The Canadian Press
Posted: 3:04 AM | Comments: 0 | Last Modified: 1:55 PM
Image
RAW video outside 5387 Blackburn Road in Chilliwack one location out of four farms being quarantine in the Lower Mainland due to the avian flu outbreak.

VANCOUVER - The type of avian influenza responsible for an outbreak at poultry farms in southwestern British Columbia is H5N2, a source has confirmed — the same virus behind at least three other previous outbreaks at Canadian farms.
A turkey farm and a chicken farm located in the Fraser Valley were placed under quarantine earlier this week after H5 avian influenza killed thousands of birds, and two other farms have since been placed under confinement.
A source tells The Canadian Press that tests have determined the virus is a high-pathogenicity, or high-path, strain of H5N2.
Pathogenicity does not indicate the level of danger a virus poses to people. High-path avian flu viruses kill birds, while low-path viruses can reduce egg production.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency was expected to provide more information Thursday afternoon.
About 18,000 birds are either already dead or set to be euthanized at the original pair of farms. The two other farms that had received chickens from the Chilliwack facility were placed under quarantine on Wednesday, though officials haven't confirmed avian influenza at the new sites.
Officials have cautioned that the virus does not pose a risk to consumers if poultry meat is properly handled and cooked, though in rare cases it can be transmitted to people who work in close contact with the animals.
In 2010, a high-path strain of H5N2 avian flu in Manitoba at a turkey breeder farm led to the destruction of 8,200 birds.
The Fraser Valley has previously seen two outbreaks involving H5N2.
About 74,000 turkeys and chickens were destroyed in 2009 after a low-path strain of H5N2 infected poultry at two Fraser Valley farms, and more than 60,000 ducks and geese were destroyed at two farms in the region in 2005. In both cases, the culprit was a low-path strain of H5N2.
The most serious avian influenza outbreak in Canada was in 2004, when a high-path strain of H7N3 spread to 42 commercial farms and 11 backyard coups in the Fraser Valley. In response, the federal government ordered the slaughter of 17 million chickens, turkeys and other domestic birds.
The current outbreak is already having an economic impact on the Canadian poultry industry.
Since this avian flu was reported, Japan has banned all Canadian poultry products, as well as the import of chicks from B.C.; South Korea has banned chicks from Canada; Taiwan has banned all B.C. poultry and poultry products; and Hong Kong has banned poultry products from the Fraser Valley.
B.C.'s Ministry of Agriculture says the province's poultry industry produced 160 million kilograms of chicken in 2012, and 21 million kilograms of turkey.
Follow @ByJamesKeller on Twitter
— With files from Helen Branswell in Toronto

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-a ... 18221.html

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 4:48 pm 
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H5N2 map

https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit? ... 0Jt6F7NlIM

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 5:05 pm 
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Tests confirm avian influenza strain at B.C. farms as H5N2: source
By: James Keller, The Canadian Press
http://media.brandonsun.com/images/648* ... 3_high.jpg
A poultry farm under quarantine because of a outbreak of avian influenza is pictured in Chilliwack, B.C. Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency now says that there are now four farms in the Fraser Valley under quarantine due to this outbreak. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

VANCOUVER - The type of avian influenza responsible for an outbreak at poultry farms in southwestern British Columbia is H5N2, a source has confirmed — the same virus behind at least three other previous outbreaks at Canadian farms.
A turkey farm and a chicken farm located in the Fraser Valley were placed under quarantine earlier this week after H5 avian influenza killed thousands of birds, and two more farms have since been placed under confinement.
A source tells The Canadian Press that tests have determined the virus is a high-pathogenic, or high-path, strain of H5N2. Previous H5N2 outbreaks in Canada were low path.
Pathogenicity does not indicate the level of danger a virus poses to people. High-path avian flu viruses kill birds, while low-path viruses can reduce egg production.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency was expected to provide more information Thursday afternoon.
About 18,000 birds are either already dead or set to be euthanized at the original pair of farms. The two other farms that had received chickens from the Chilliwack facility were placed under quarantine on Wednesday, though officials haven't confirmed avian influenza at the new sites.
Officials have cautioned that the virus does not pose a risk to consumers if poultry meat is properly handled and cooked, though in rare cases it can be transmitted to people who work in close contact with the animals.
In 2010, a low-path strain of H5N2 avian flu in Manitoba at a turkey breeder farm led to the destruction of 8,200 birds.
The Fraser Valley has previously seen two outbreaks involving low-path H5N2.
About 74,000 turkeys and chickens were destroyed in 2009 after a low-path strain of H5N2 infected poultry at two Fraser Valley farms, and more than 60,000 ducks and geese were destroyed at two farms in the region in 2005.
The most serious avian influenza outbreak in Canada was in 2004, when a high-path strain of H7N3 spread to 42 commercial farms and 11 backyard coups in the Fraser Valley. In response, the federal government ordered the slaughter of 17 million chickens, turkeys and other domestic birds.
The current outbreak is already having an economic impact on the Canadian poultry industry.
Since this avian flu was reported, Japan has banned all Canadian poultry products, as well as the import of chicks from B.C.; South Korea has banned chicks from Canada; Taiwan has banned all B.C. poultry and poultry products; and Hong Kong has banned poultry products from the Fraser Valley.
B.C.'s Ministry of Agriculture says the province's poultry industry produced 160 million kilograms of chicken in 2012, and 21 million kilograms of turkey.
Follow @ByJamesKeller on Twitter
— With files from Helen Branswell in Toronto
Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version said a 2010 outbreak in Manitoba was high-path H5N2

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-a ... 18221.html

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 2:31 pm 
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niman wrote:
Tests confirm avian influenza strain at B.C. farms as H5N2: source
By: James Keller, The Canadian Press
http://media.brandonsun.com/images/648* ... 3_high.jpg
A poultry farm under quarantine because of a outbreak of avian influenza is pictured in Chilliwack, B.C. Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency now says that there are now four farms in the Fraser Valley under quarantine due to this outbreak. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

VANCOUVER - The type of avian influenza responsible for an outbreak at poultry farms in southwestern British Columbia is H5N2, a source has confirmed — the same virus behind at least three other previous outbreaks at Canadian farms.
A turkey farm and a chicken farm located in the Fraser Valley were placed under quarantine earlier this week after H5 avian influenza killed thousands of birds, and two more farms have since been placed under confinement.
A source tells The Canadian Press that tests have determined the virus is a high-pathogenic, or high-path, strain of H5N2. Previous H5N2 outbreaks in Canada were low path.
Pathogenicity does not indicate the level of danger a virus poses to people. High-path avian flu viruses kill birds, while low-path viruses can reduce egg production.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency was expected to provide more information Thursday afternoon.
About 18,000 birds are either already dead or set to be euthanized at the original pair of farms. The two other farms that had received chickens from the Chilliwack facility were placed under quarantine on Wednesday, though officials haven't confirmed avian influenza at the new sites.
Officials have cautioned that the virus does not pose a risk to consumers if poultry meat is properly handled and cooked, though in rare cases it can be transmitted to people who work in close contact with the animals.
In 2010, a low-path strain of H5N2 avian flu in Manitoba at a turkey breeder farm led to the destruction of 8,200 birds.
The Fraser Valley has previously seen two outbreaks involving low-path H5N2.
About 74,000 turkeys and chickens were destroyed in 2009 after a low-path strain of H5N2 infected poultry at two Fraser Valley farms, and more than 60,000 ducks and geese were destroyed at two farms in the region in 2005.
The most serious avian influenza outbreak in Canada was in 2004, when a high-path strain of H7N3 spread to 42 commercial farms and 11 backyard coups in the Fraser Valley. In response, the federal government ordered the slaughter of 17 million chickens, turkeys and other domestic birds.
The current outbreak is already having an economic impact on the Canadian poultry industry.
Since this avian flu was reported, Japan has banned all Canadian poultry products, as well as the import of chicks from B.C.; South Korea has banned chicks from Canada; Taiwan has banned all B.C. poultry and poultry products; and Hong Kong has banned poultry products from the Fraser Valley.
B.C.'s Ministry of Agriculture says the province's poultry industry produced 160 million kilograms of chicken in 2012, and 21 million kilograms of turkey.
Follow @ByJamesKeller on Twitter
— With files from Helen Branswell in Toronto
Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version said a 2010 outbreak in Manitoba was high-path H5N2

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-a ... 18221.html

VANCOUVER - The virus at the centre of an avian influenza outbreak in British Columbia's Fraser Valley is the H5N2 strain, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency said Thursday — the same variety behind at least three previous outbreaks at Canadian farms.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 5:30 pm 
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · now 10 seconds ago
#CFIA chief vet Dr. Harpreet Kochhar said avian influenza has also been identified in four farms, although it is highly contagious.
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 3m 3 minutes ago
There are 80,000 birds on four farms that will be killed because of #avianinfluenza in Chilliwack and Abbotsford. #westcdnag
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 8m 8 minutes ago
Only four farms have tested pos for #avianinfluenza on BC farms. No other farms or birds tested pos, said CFIA vet Dr. Harpreet Kochhaar.
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 14m 14 minutes ago
Birds, poultry and feed from the four barns with avian influenza will be composted, first inside, then outside. Compost heat will kill virus
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 22m 22 minutes ago
Poultry producers impacted by #avianinfluenza will be compensated in accordance with rules, said CFIA chief vet Dr. Harpreet Kochhar.
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 23m 23 minutes ago
#CFIA depopulating birds on a broiler breeder chicken farm, where Avian Influenza positively id. Birds from other farm will be also be depop
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 30m 30 minutes ago
Am on a #CFIA technical briefing of latest in avian influenza in BC poultry barns. Will update any new information. #westcdnag

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 9:20 pm 
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Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
niman wrote:
Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · now 10 seconds ago
#CFIA chief vet Dr. Harpreet Kochhar said avian influenza has also been identified in four farms, although it is highly contagious.
0 replies 0 retweets 0 favorites
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 3m 3 minutes ago
There are 80,000 birds on four farms that will be killed because of #avianinfluenza in Chilliwack and Abbotsford. #westcdnag
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 8m 8 minutes ago
Only four farms have tested pos for #avianinfluenza on BC farms. No other farms or birds tested pos, said CFIA vet Dr. Harpreet Kochhaar.
0 replies 0 retweets 0 favorites
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 14m 14 minutes ago
Birds, poultry and feed from the four barns with avian influenza will be composted, first inside, then outside. Compost heat will kill virus
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 22m 22 minutes ago
Poultry producers impacted by #avianinfluenza will be compensated in accordance with rules, said CFIA chief vet Dr. Harpreet Kochhar.
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 23m 23 minutes ago
#CFIA depopulating birds on a broiler breeder chicken farm, where Avian Influenza positively id. Birds from other farm will be also be depop
0 replies 0 retweets 0 favorites
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Mary MacArthur @marymacarthur · 30m 30 minutes ago
Am on a #CFIA technical briefing of latest in avian influenza in BC poultry barns. Will update any new information. #westcdnag

Audio
https://soundcloud.com/bcgov/canadian-f ... ber-5-2014
Posted on Dec 5, 2014

30:43

Dr Harpreet Kochhar says the CFIA has begun depopulating birds from a farm in the Fraser Valley to stop the spread of the avian flu. The chief veterinary officer notes all birds are being humanly euthanized.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 9:47 pm 
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Audio Dec 4 update
https://soundcloud.com/bcgov/canadian-f ... ber-4-2014

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2014 9:48 pm 
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Map updates with distribution of 80000 birds culled

https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit? ... 0Jt6F7NlIM

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 5:41 am 
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UPDATE: Avian flu means turmoil for Chilliwack poultry farmers – Virus found on more farms
Image
CFIA workers at Fraser Valley Duck and Goose in Yarrow in November 2005 when 70,000 birds had to be culled.— Image Credit: Times/File

by Paul J. Henderson - Chilliwack Times
posted Dec 10, 2014 at 12:00 PM— updated Dec 10, 2014 at 1:22 PM
Image
While so far just one Chilliwack poultry producer is directly affected by the recent H5N2 avian influenza outbreak, the impact is felt by all.

“A finding of notifiable avian influenza (H5 or H7 strains) is very difficult for an infected farm owner, and for poultry producers in general,” said Ken Falk, owner of Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry in Yarrow.

“It essentially throws an otherwise orderly and structured industry into turmoil/chaos.”

And Falk should know as his operation was hit hard in both 2004 when the entire Fraser Valley was decimated with avian flu, but again in 2005 when his operation, then known as Fraser Valley Duck and Goose, was hit again.

He’s still frustrated about 2005 when a low pathogenic strain hit his ducks, which are a host adapted species, meaning they did not become symptomatic. As a result of Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) rules implemented after 2004, Falk had to cull 70,000 otherwise healthy birds.

Falk said the CFIA made mistakes in 2004 when it came to containment and they made mistakes later when it came to compensation. He’s been told the programs work now, and he hopes he doesn’t have to test them.

Most recently the CFIA said the entire southern half of British Columbia is now part of an avian influenza “primary control zone,” as a result of an outbreak of the disease on farms in Chilliwack and Abbotsford.

The H5N2 strain was found first at one farm in Chilliwack and one farm in Abbotsford. A few days later two more farms were added to the quarantine list.

On Wednesday, the CFIA reported avian flu was found on two more chicken farms in Abbotsford, and in another barn on an original site. That second barn is a separate business so is treated by the CFIA as a standalone case. The brings the total number of affected farms to eight.

All farms are within eight kilometres of each other.
Image
“Any kind of movement out of the primary control zone will be monitored,” CFIA chief veterinary officer Dr. Harpreet Kochhar said at a technical briefing Monday.

More than 155,000 chickens and turkeys on farms in Chilliwack and Abbotsford have either died from the highly pathogenic H5N2 strain, or have been euthanized.

Kochhar said the creation of a primary control zone is supported by poultry farmers, but will impact the industry. The reason for the zone, he said, is to protect animal health, control disease spread and to minimize trade disruptions outside of the zone.

The move comes as more countries announce a ban on poultry and poultry products from the area. The United States chief veterinarian announced a ban on live and raw poultry from B.C. Bans of varying degrees—as specific as the Fraser Valley and as broad as all of Canada—are now in place from Mexico, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and South Africa.

The CFIA continues to investigate the source of the disease, but suspicion is squarely on migratory birds.

Some poultry farmers have not been keen to chat about the current outbreak, deferring instead to the BC Poultry Association.

The Times contacted the

Chilliwack farmer whose 13,000 birds had to be euthanized last week, but Chris den Hertog said he preferred not to comment at this time.

Walter Dyck, president of the Chilliwack Agriculture Commission and a poultry farmer for decades, too, deferred comments to the association.

Falk at Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry was forthcoming with his feeling that the government and CFIA did not respond well in 2004. He does try to remain optimistic, however, about the lessons learned.

“Just over one week into the control/eradication efforts and we are faced with a lot more questions than answers,” Falk told the Times. “It will be very difficult for all producers in the coming weeks, but we are committed to work together to bring this to a successful conclusion.”

Certified organic turkey producers Jeff and Carrie Hooge in Greendale are watching their outdoor grazing animals closely.

“We are taking every precautionary measure that we can to prevent the avian influenza from coming into contact on our farm, while still proving an environment in which we can raise our turkeys ethically and while abiding 100 per cent by the Canadian Organic standards,” Carrie said in an email. “We know that lots of Chilliwack residents are passionate about eating local, and we are happy to be able to provide an organic, local and ethical option for their Christmas feast.”

http://www.chilliwacktimes.com/news/285402861.html

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2014 9:46 am 
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Details Emerge of Canada's Latest Avian Flu Outbreaks
11 December 2014

CANADA - Details have emerged of the three most recent confirmed outbreaks of H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza in British Columbia. The five outbreaks have affected 112,800 birds, mainly broiler breeders and meat turkeys.
The three most recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian flu in Canada were all confirmed as the H5N2 variant and located in Abbotsford in the Fraser Valley region of British Columbia. Of the 72,000 birds on the three farms, 322 died and 40,728 have been destroyed.
First was a broiler breeder farm with 14,000 birds, of which 250 died and the rest have been destroyed. The affected barn held breeding hens and roosters aged 37 weeks., where sudden deaths occurred around 2 December. In addition, two-week-old pullets on the premises experienced normal mortality rates.
Also on 2 December, another farm with 27,000 broiler breeders were affected. Again, one barn of hens and roosters aged 41 weeks experienced sudden death, while other birds aged seven and 59 weeks of age appeared unaffected. Twenty-two birds died and the rest of the birds on the farm have been destroyed.
Two days later, on 4 December, a meat turkey farm suffered an outbreak, with one barn of nine-week-old birds showing high mortality - 50 birds in all. The four- and 14-week-old birds on the premises had normal mortality rates.
According to the report - Follow Up Report No.1 dated 9 December - testing at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease (NCFAD) on samples from the two original outbreaks in the same area confirm that the virus is a highly pathogenic form of the H5N2 subtype.
CFIA has also confirmed H5 avian influenza virus in three additional farms in the same report. The two farms with outbreaks starting on 2 December have been humanely depopulated.
At this point, this event is limited geographically to a portion of the Fraser Valley in the southern fringe of the province of British Columbia.
Infected premises were quarantined by the CFIA and a stamping out policy is being implemented, as described in the Notifiable Avian Influenza (NAI) Hazard Specific Plan.
The Canadian Notifiable Avian Influenza Surveillance System (CanNAISS) is an ongoing surveillance system built to demonstrate absence of NAI in poultry in Canada. CanNAISS results and epidemiological investigation to date are supporting that there is no evidence of infection outside of the Fraser Valley in British Columbia.
On 8 December 2014, CFIA established a primary control zone in the area where the disease has been identified. The primary control zone is bordered on the west by the Pacific Ocean, on the south by the United States border, on the north by Highway 16, and on the east by the border between British Columbia and Alberta. Additional information on the zone and the restrictions in place are available by clicking here.
Further details of the two first outbreaks have emerged as follows:
On 30 November, a farm with a total of 12,800 broiler breeders in Chilliwack reported 10 per cent mortality among 24-week old birds in one barn, while 47-week-old birds in an adjacent barn were unaffected. In all, 700 birds died within 24 to 48 hours and the rest were destroyed.
On the same date in Abbotsford, a farm with 83-day-old turkey toms experienced 70 per cent mortality within 24 to 48 hours, amounting to 7,700 birds. Hens and two-week-old poults on the premises appeared unaffected. All remaining birds were destroyed.

http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultryne ... -outbreaks

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