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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 10:57 am 
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Dec 3, 9:15 AM EST
Avian flu outbreak on British Columbia farms

VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) -- Avian flu has been discovered at two poultry farms in southwestern British Columbia.

Provincial and Canadian officials say the farms are under quarantine and thousands of birds will be killed.

There are no reports of the disease being transmitted to humans.

Canada's chief veterinary officer, Harpreet Kochhar, said tests were conducted Sunday after bird deaths were reported at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a chicken farm in Chilliwack. The farms are about 5 miles apart in the Fraser Valley east of Vancouver.

The Abbotsford farm housed 11,000 turkeys that were to be slaughtered for Christmas. Half died from the bird flu. The Chilliwack barn housed 7,000 chickens and about 1,000 of those had died.

British Columbia's chief veterinary officer, Jane Pritchard, says the remaining birds will be euthanized.

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/C/ ... TE=DEFAULT

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 12:00 pm 
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Ecofactsheet: migratory birds & bird flu
News
03-12-2014
Which virus?

There are many types of avian influenza ('bird flu'). They are categorized by different combinations of proteins on the surface of the virus. So far, 16 variations of 'H' (hemagglutinin proteins) have been identified and 9 variations of 'N' (neuraminidase). In addition, some types of bird flu are classified as 'low pathogenic' (mild) while other types are 'highly pathogenic': causing symptoms of serious illness - in poultry, in particular.

The strain of bird flu responsible for the recent outbreak in the Netherlands is a highly pathogenic form of H5N8.

Where does it come from?

H5N8 was first identified in China in 2010. It probably originated there, in free range farmed ducks. The same strain of the virus was later found in South-Korea and Japan, in both farmed poultry and wild birds (Eurasian teals, Baikal teals, spot-billed ducks, mallards, taiga bean geese, white-fronted geese and Bewick's swans). In early 2014, there was a major outbreak on South-Korean poultry farms.

The strain of the virus first found in the Netherlands in November 2014 so far appears to have infected five poultry farms - closed, not free range. Genetic testing has shown the European strain to be virtually identical to the Southeast-Asian strain, suggesting it must have made its way from there.

Two farms in Germany and Britain have also been infected. And on 3 December, authorities in Canada confirmed that there has been an outbreak of H5-type bird flu on two poultry farms east of Vancouver.

Wild birds and poultry

Wild birds have much greater natural resistance to bird flu than poultry. Waterbirds in particular - ducks, swans, geese, waders, gulls - often carry mild strains of the bird flu virus without any visible symptoms of illness, except from reduced activity. Chickens, on the other hand, are extremely vulnerable. This vulnerability can cause mild forms of bird flu to mutate into highly pathogenic forms that are potentially lethal to them.

Once such a highly pathogenic form of the disease has developed, poultry may in turn infect wild birds with it ('spill-back transmission'). But some wild birds have such strong resistance that they can even carry these highly pathogenic forms of the virus without showing any visible signs of infection.

How did the virus reach the Netherlands?

The answer to this and related questions is as yet unclear. Bird flu can be spread through the transport of poultry, poultry products and fertilizer, as well as by wild birds - both migratory and resident. The evidence so far does not point to any single route the virus might have travelled.

Without certainty on this point, it is extremely difficult to take effective measures both now and in the longer term.

Teal in Germany

On the German island of Rügen, six wild ducks were tested for bird flu that had been shot some 50 kilometres away from an outbreak on a turkey farm. Three turned out to have been healthy, two carried mild strains of the virus and one - a teal - was infected with H5N8. This German teal was the first wild bird in Western Europe confirmed to be a carrier, although the fact that it was flying around normally seems to suggest it wasn't very ill.

The German discovery does not settle the question of how H5N8 spread to Europe: the sick teal could have become infected through 'spill-back transmission' (see above). It is worth noting that no traces whatsoever of H5N8 bird flu have been found in samples from duck decoys as part of regular Dutch and European monitoring programmes.

Migration routes

Image

PINPIN - WIKIMEDIA COMMONS / CREATIVE COMMONS 3.0 BY-SA

Wild birds from Southeast Asia do not migrate to Western Europe. Their main point of contact with 'our' migratory birds is when both groups stop over in their breeding grounds in Siberia. It is possible that H5N8 was transmitted there, and that it reached Europe through some kind of relay involving more than one species of bird.

Samples from waterbirds in the Arctic have so far not produced any evidence of widespread infection, past or present. But monitoring in this area would need to be stepped up significantly before any conclusion can be reached.

Latest research into infection among wild birds

If migratory or other wild birds are indeed responsible for spreading H5N8, it should not be too hard at this stage to find traces of the virus in nature. That is why research teams from the Erasmus MC, NIOO-KNAW, the Centre for Avian Migration and the Dutch Centre for Field Ornithology set to work right away after the outbreak, taking samples from the surrounding area and analysing them.

NIOO-researchers have mainly collected fecal samples from mute swans, Bewick's swans and various species of ducks. They have also taken throat and cloacal swabs from mute swans, as well as some blood samples.

Initial results

On 1 December, deputy Economic Affairs minister Sharon Dijksma announced that feces of two wigeons near Kamerik (province of Utrecht) were found to contain traces of H5N8 bird flu.

https://nioo.knaw.nl/en/news/ecofactshe ... s-bird-flu

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 12:11 pm 
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Avian flu found at two B.C. farms; thousands of turkeys, chickens killed
WENDY STUECK
Vancouver — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Dec. 02 2014, 4:10 PM EST
Last updated Tuesday, Dec. 02 2014, 9:46 PM EST

Two Fraser Valley poultry farms have been placed under quarantine and others are stepping up biosecurity precautions after tests found H5 avian influenza at the two operations.

About 12,000 birds are expected to be killed as part of an effort to stop the virus from spreading to other farms.

Authorities do not yet know the exact strain involved or how it wound up at the two sites: a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler breeder farm in Chilliwack that are about eight kilometres apart and so far at least, have no obvious connections.

“I don’t think we can even safely say whether this points to either migratory birds or the possibility of some interaction that we are not aware of at this point,” Jane Pritchard, chief veterinary officer with B.C.’s Ministry of Agriculture, said Tuesday on a conference call.

Avian influenza viruses do not pose a food-safety risk as long as poultry products are properly cooked. And the viruses rarely affect humans who do not have consistent contact with infected birds.

There have been previous avian-influenza outbreaks in the Fraser Valley, including one in 2004 involving the H7N3 virus that resulted in about 17 million birds, nearly all the poultry in the region, having to be destroyed.

Preliminary testing has identified the virus in these new incidents as H5, but further testing is required to determine the exact strain. Those results are expected within days.

The Chilliwack operation had about 7,000 chickens, about 1,000 of which had already died. The Abbotsford facility had about 11,000 turkeys, about half of which had already died.

All of the birds from both operations are to be destroyed. The turkeys had been targeted for the Christmas market.

“We provide product all year round, but turkey would be the most seasonal of our products,” said Ray Nickel, a spokesman for the B.C. Poultry Association. “Christmastime is obviously important and this is an important time for sales.”

But he does not anticipate a shortage, saying there are about 60 turkey producers in the Fraser Valley region.

“Although the numbers sound like those are large farms, relative to the industry, we have lots of product,” he said.

Initial tests were conducted on Dec. 1 after both operations reported sudden deaths of birds over the weekend. The CFIA will set up a surveillance zone for further testing and the industry has been put on notice to step up its safeguards.

“The farms that are surrounding those [affected sites] will really tighten up their movement controls – so you won’t be getting visitors on the farm, the gates will be getting locked and closed every time someone goes in and out,” Mr. Nickel said.

Birds on the infected sites will be killed and disposed of according to environmental and disease-control guidelines. The birds will be composted inside the barns.

“Over the previous episodes of avian influenza in B.C., the ministry of agriculture has developed quite a bit of expertise in humanely euthanizing the birds using carbon-dioxide gas,” Dr. Pritchard said.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/bri ... e21884391/

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 5:08 pm 
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Avian flu in Fraser Valley unlikely to spread: B.C. Poultry Association
Thousands of birds will be euthanized after virus was found on farms in Abbotsford and Chilliwack
By Jesara Sinclair, CBC News Posted: Dec 03, 2014 12:08 PM PT Last Updated: Dec 03, 2014 12:08 PM PT

The president of the B.C. Poultry Association has confidence security measures will prevent the spread of avian flu after it was discovered on two farms in the Fraser Valley.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed the virus at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler chicken breeding facility in Chilliwack on Tuesday. Thousands of birds will be euthanized.

"When something like this happens, those farms are quarantined so nothing can come on or off of those places," Ray Nickel with the B.C. Poultry Association told The Early Edition's Rick Cluff.

"The farms that are in the surrounding area go into what we call a lockdown."

In 2004, millions of birds were killed after an outbreak of the virus.

Nickel said since that outbreak, new security measures have been put in place, and those new rules have already been proven to work.

"We managed through another outbreak in 2009 which hardly hit the map because of the way it was done," he said.

Turkeys from the farm in Abbotsford were destined to be sold for Christmas dinner.

Nickel said consumers shouldn't be worried about the quality of their meat.

"This is about bird health, this isn't a human issue as far as buying your product," he said.

The virus does not pose a risk to food products that are properly cooked.

To hear more about the avian flu outbreak, click on the audio clip labelled: Ray Nickel confident avian flu won't spread, or watch the video titled: Avian flu detected at 2 B.C. poultry farms.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-c ... -1.2858916

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 8:56 pm 
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British Columbia confirms two H5 outbreaks in poultry
Preliminary tests by British Columbia have confirmed H5 avian flu on two poultry farms in the province, according to a Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) statement yesterday.

The farms—a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a chicken broiler breeder farm in Chilliwack—are about 5 miles apart, CBC News reported yesterday. The agency placed the farms under quarantine to control disease spread and has advised the poultry industry to enhance biosecurity steps.

The CFIA said it expects test results tomorrow on the specific virus subtype and its pathogenicity. It did not specify the number of affected poultry.

"The Province of British Columbia, the CFIA, the owners of the infected birds, and the poultry industry are working closely together to manage the situation," the CFIA statement said. "The Canadian poultry sector currently practices a high level of biosecurity that reduces the risk of disease spread."

In 2009 an H5N2 avian flu outbreak affected 60,000 turkeys at a farm in Abbotsford.
Dec 2 CFIA statement
Dec 2 CBC News story
Feb 4, 2009, CIDRAP News story on previous outbreak

http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspect ... ec-03-2014

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 11:54 am 
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Information received on 03/12/2014 from Dr Martine Dubuc, OIE Delegate for Canada, Chief Food Safety Officer Vice-President, Science Branch, Health Ministry, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Canada


Summary

Report type Immediate notification
Date of start of the event 30/11/2014
Date of pre-confirmation of the event 01/12/2014
Report date 03/12/2014
Date submitted to OIE 03/12/2014
Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
Date of previous occurrence 01/2008
Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
Causal agent Avian influenza virus
Serotype H5
Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
This event pertains to the whole country



New outbreaks (2)



Outbreak 1 (BC-2014-NAI-001) Chilliwack, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Date of start of the outbreak 30/11/2014
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 7000 700 700 0 0

Affected population Chicken broiler breeder farm (3 barns). The affected barn holds a flock of 24 weeks of age. Two adjacent barns, not affected, one with a flock of 47 weeks of age and one of a 1 week old pullet flock.



Outbreak 2 (BC-2014-NAI-002) Abbotsford, BRITISH COLUMBIA
Date of start of the outbreak 30/11/2014
Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
Epidemiological unit Farm
Affected animals
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 11000 5500 5500 0 0

Affected population Meat turkey farm 83 days of age



Summary of outbreaks Total outbreaks: 2
Total animals affected
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 18000 6200 6200 0 0

Outbreak statistics
Species Apparent morbidity rate Apparent mortality rate Apparent case fatality rate Proportion susceptible animals lost*
Birds 34.44% 34.44% 100.00% 34.44%

*Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter


Epidemiology

Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection Unknown or inconclusive

Epidemiological comments Important note: Although this event is reported as highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), full subtyping and pathogenicity index (IVPI) are not yet completed. Reporting as HPAI is based on preliminary testing and clinical signs. Sudden high mortality (10% in outbreak in Chilliwack and 50% in outbreak in Abbotsford) within 24-48 hrs. Preliminary testing done at the British Columbia Provincial Laboratory indicates presence of H5 avian influenza virus. Additional testing currently underway at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease (NCFAD).



Control measures

Measures applied Quarantine
Vaccination prohibited
No treatment of affected animals

Measures to be applied Stamping out

Movement control inside the country

Screening

Zoning

Disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)




Diagnostic test results

Laboratory name and type Species Test Test date Result
Animal Health Centre, British Columbia Ministry of Agriculture (Local laboratory) Birds real-time reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) 01/12/2014 Positive


Future Reporting

The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public/wahid ... newlang=en

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 12:08 pm 
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Immediate notification report
Report reference: CAN-2014-NAI-001 REF OIE 16660, Report Date: 03/12/2014, Country : Canada
Report Summary
Name of sender of the report Dr Martine Dubuc Telephone +1 613 773 5722
Position OIE Delegate for Canada, Chief Food Safety Officer Vice-President,
Science Branch
Fax +1 613 773 5797
Address Floor 3, Room 349
1400 Merivale Road, Tower 2
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y9 Ottawa
Email martine.dubuc@inspection.gc.ca
Date submitted to OIE 03/12/2014
Animal type Terrestrial Date of report 03/12/2014
Disease Highly pathogenic avian influenza Date of start of the event 30/11/2014
Causal Agent Avian influenza virus Date of pre-confirmation of the
event
01/12/2014
Serotype(s) H5 Date of last occurrence 01/2008
Reason Reoccurrence of a listed disease Diagnosis Laboratory (advanced)
Country or zone the whole country Clinical signs Yes
Number of reported outbreaks submitted= 2, Draft= 0
Outbreak details
Province Number of outbreaks District Sub-district Unit Type Location Latitude Longitude Start Date End Date:
BRITISH COLUMBIA-
(this report - submitted)
- Farm Abbotsford 49.052273 -122.30595 30/11/2014
Species Measuring units Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds Animals 11000 5500 5500 0 0
Affected Population Meat turkey farm 83 days of age
Province Number of outbreaks District Sub-district Unit Type Location Latitude Longitude Start Date End Date:
BRITISH COLUMBIA-
(this report - submitted)
- Farm Chilliwack 49.171042 -121.95099 30/11/2014
Species Measuring units Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds Animals 7000 700 700 0 0
Affected Population Chicken broiler breeder farm (3 barns).
The affected barn holds a flock of 24 weeks of age.
Two adjacent barns, not affected, one with a flock of 47 weeks of age and one of a 1 week old pullet flock.
Outbreak summary: Total outbreaks = 2 (Submitted)
Species Susceptible Cases Deaths Destroyed Slaughtered
Birds 18000 6200 6200 0 0
Epidemiology
Epidemiological comments
Important note: Although this event is reported as highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), full subtyping and pathogenicity index (IVPI) are not yet completed. Reporting as HPAI is based on preliminary testing and clinical signs.
Sudden high mortality (10% in outbreak in Chilliwack and 50% in outbreak in Abbotsford) within 24-48 hrs. Preliminary testing done at the British Columbia Provincial Laboratory indicates presence of H5 avian influenza virus. Additional testing currently underway at the Canadian
Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease (NCFAD).
Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
• Unknown or inconclusive
Measures applied
Applied To be applied
Printed on: Thu Dec 4 12:21:47 CET 2014 Page 1/3Applied To be applied
• quarantine • stamping out
• movement control inside the country
• screening
• zoning
• disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)
Animals treated Vaccination Prohibited
No Yes
Diagnostic test results
Laboratory Type Name of Laboratory Species Test Type Date Results Provided Result
Local laboratory Animal Health Centre, British
Columbia Ministry of
Agriculture
Birds real-time reverse
transcriptase/polymerase chain
reaction (RRT-PCR)
01/12/2014 Positive

http://www.oie.int/wahis_2/public%5C..% ... 122147.pdf

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 12:15 pm 
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Map updated
https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit? ... IjI0Pz2tn8

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 1:41 pm 
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Avian flu strain in Fraser Valley identified
News1130 Staff December 4, 2014 9:33 am

FRASER VALLEY (NEWS1130) – A source to News1130 has confirmed the type of avian flu strain that is affecting four farms in the Fraser Valley.

It’s called H5N2; the strain can transfer between birds more easily and is quite potent.

However, we’re told it’s not as bad as two other strains of the bird flu virus.

Thousands of turkeys, chickens, and eggs are being destroyed at the farms in Abbotsford and Chilliwack.

http://www.news1130.com/2014/12/04/avia ... dentified/

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