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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:17 pm 
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Avian flu detected at two Fraser Valley farms; up to 1,800 chickens, turkeys dead or to be destroyed


BY BRIAN MORTON AND TIFFANY CRAWFORD, VANCOUVER SUN DECEMBER 2, 2014 3:05 PM
Avian flu detected at two Fraser Valley farms; up to 1,800 chickens, turkeys dead or to be destroyed
Image

As many as 18,000 chickens and turkeys are either dead or will be destroyed after the Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed cases of avian influenza at two Fraser Valley farms.
Photograph by: Ward Perrin , PNG Files


"At one farm, there were originally 11,000 birds and over half have died from the disease," B.C.'s chief veterinary officer Jane Pritchard said in a conference call Tuesday afternoon. Health officials reported earlier the presence of H5 avian flu had been detected at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler breeder farm in Chilliwack.

"At the other farm, there were 7,000 birds and approximately 1,000 have died. The number of birds to be euthanized is a moving target at this point, but between the two farms 18,000 birds will have to be composted in the barns."

The CFIA has placed the two farms under quarantine to control the spread of disease and further testing by the CFIA is under way to confirm the severity of illness and to determine the strain of the virus.

Results are expected within days.

All birds on the infected premises will be euthanized, officials said, and the province will help with required carcass disposal.

The CFIA said initial tests for the disease were conducted on Monday at a Ministry of Agriculture laboratory in Abbotsford, after both operations experienced sudden deaths of birds on the weekend.

Avian influenza viruses do not pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked.

In the conference call, Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, Canada's chief veterinary officer, said that there is no specific information on how the virus ended up at the two barns.

"There are multiple ways of transmission either through migratory birds or through movement from infected barns to another, or from humans.

"We will have to undertake a full assessment of what is the cause."

He noted that U.S. authorities have also been notified about the outbreak.

Pritchard also said that the birds were 83 days old, "so they would have been targeted for the Christmas market."

She said that the birds will be composted within the farm, "so that nothing comes out and it can't be airborne. There's no remnants of the birds."

Canada's first human case of avian flu was confirmed in January, after an Alberta patient died from the virus. Officials say person-to-person transmission of avian flu is extremely rare.

During the avian flu outbreak of 2004, the virus was never detected in a human, but more than 17 million birds were culled, making it the largest animal cull in Canadian history.

There was another, albeit smaller, cull in 2009, when 60,000 birds were euthanized at a farm in Abbotsford.

bmorton@vancouversun.com

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Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/Avian+detec ... z3KmknS0p6

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:23 pm 
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Bird Flu Found in Canada With Two Farms Under Quarantine
By Jen Skerritt Dec 2, 2014 5:43 PM ET

The disease known as bird flu has been detected in Canada, with two British Columbia poultry farms placed under quarantine.

The sites, a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler breeder in Chilliwack, tested positive for the presence of the H5 strain of avian influenza, the government said today. Initial tests for the disease were conducted yesterday at a provincial laboratory after both operations “experienced sudden deaths of birds over the weekend,” according to a statement.

More than half of the 11,000 birds on the Abbotsford farm died, and 1,000 of 7,000 birds perished at Chilliwack, Jane Pritchard, chief veterinary officer at the province’s agriculture ministry, said on a conference call. The farms are about 8 kilometers (5 miles) apart, and officials are investigating whether migratory birds or interaction between farm personnel may have contributed to the infection, she said.

“The turkeys were 83 days of age, so they would have been targeted for the Christmas market,” Pritchard said.

“All birds on the infected premises will be humanely euthanized and disposed of,” the government said. Avian influenza viruses don’t pose risks to food safety when poultry is properly handled and cooked, and the virus “rarely affects humans that do not have consistent contact with infected birds.”

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is conducting more tests to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus, and results are expected within days, the government said.

To contact the reporter on this story: Jen Skerritt in Winnipeg at jskerritt1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Millie Munshi at mmunshi@bloomberg.net Patrick McKiernan
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-12-0 ... ne-1-.html?

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 7:40 pm 
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Bird flu kills thousands of birds near Canada, US border
Reuters with CNBC
1 Hour Ago
Reuters

Avian influenza, known as bird flu, has killed thousands of turkeys and chickens on two farms in the province of British Columbia, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said on Tuesday. The farms are about three miles from Canada's border with Washington state.

The government agency said it has placed the farms under quarantine as it conducts tests over the coming days to determine the virus' precise subtype, and its pathogenicity, or severity.

It has so far identified the virus type as H5, which has previously been reported in Canada, said Harpreet Kochhar, the CFIA's chief veterinary officer. The will determine if it is the highly infectious H5N8 strain.

Avian flu is an infectious viral disease of birds. Most bird flu viruses do not infect humans, but some have caused serious infections in humans, according to the World Health Organization.

Germany, the Netherlands and Britain reported cases last month of the highly pathogenic bird flu H5N8, which is similar to one that devastated poultry flocks in South Korea earlier this year, but has never been detected in humans.

About half of 11,000 turkeys at a farm at Abbotsford, British Columbia, have already died from the disease, while 1,000 of 7,000 broiler chickens at a second farm near Chilliwack, British Columbia, have died, said Jane Pritchard, the West Coast province's chief veterinary officer. All of the remaining birds on the farms, which are five miles apart, will be killed.

The outbreak is the fourth in the Fraser Valley region since 2004, according to CBC news. In 2004, an H7-type flu wiped out about 15 million birds in the region, CBC reported Tuesday.
Kochhar said it is unclear how the virus infected the farms. He said he has notified U.S. authorities about the discovery.

In 2014, Canada exported 145,000 metric ton of broiler meat and 25,000 metric ton of turkey meat, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/102233741?

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 8:12 pm 
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Authorities in Canada have put two poultry farms in British Columbia under quarantine after they tested positive for bird flu.

The tests were conducted yesterday at the two infected sites - a turkey farm and a chicken breeding facility.

"Preliminary testing by the province of British Columbia has confirmed the presence of H5 avian influenza on two farms in the Fraser Valley" region, according to a statement by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Authorities said that within a few days they expect to receive the results of testing "to confirm pathogenicity and to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus".

The testing was undertaken after both farms experienced an unexpectedly high number of sudden bird deaths over the weekend.

Officials said infected poultry would be euthanised and discarded in accordance with international health and safety protocols.

http://www.rte.ie/news/2014/1202/664246-canada-bid-flu/?

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 8:39 pm 
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Avian flu detected at 2 Fraser Valley poultry farms
Virus detected at Abbotsford turkey farm and Chilliwack broiler chicken breeding farm
CBC News Posted: Dec 02, 2014 12:36 PM PT Last Updated: Dec 02, 2014 4:14 PM PT

The H5 avian influenza virus has been detected on two poultry farms in the Fraser Valley east of Vancouver, officials in B.C. have confirmed

Testing found the virus at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler chicken breeding facility in Chilliwack, officials said in a statement released just after noon PT on Tuesday.

"The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has placed the two farms under quarantine to control disease spread and the industry sector has been notified to adopt enhanced biosecurity practices," said the statement.

Testing was conducted on Monday after thousands of birds died at the farms over the weekend.

"In terms of the virus, it's showing heavy mortality" on the two affected farms, said Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, chief veterinary officer of Canada.

It's not yet known how easily the infection can spread, said Kochhar.

Officials said the two farms are about eight kilometres apart, on either side of the Vedder River. It's not clear how they became infected, whether from migratory birds or another source.

"At this point we have no direct connection between the two barns," said Dr. Jane Pritchard, chief veterinary officer for B.C.

"There will be all kinds of investigations to see whether there were personnel that moved between the two barns, but at this point there is nothing."

On mobile? Click here to see map showing the area of the Fraser Valley where the farms are located


18,000 birds affected

About half of the 11,000 birds on the Abbotsford turkey farm and 1,000 of the 7,000 birds on the Chilliwack farm have already died from the disease.

The turkeys were 83 days old and being raised for sale at Christmas, said Pritchard.

The rest of the birds will be killed by gassing the barns with carbon monoxide.

The carcasses will then be composted in the barn to contain the disease before they are removed, and the farms will remain under quarantine until the barns, equipment and vehicles are disinfected.

Further testing is underway to determine the precise subtype and strain of the virus, CFIA said, and the results are expected within days.

Public health officials will monitor for any human illness, offer influenza vaccine, and test and treat anyone displaying symptoms, said B.C. Provincial Health Officer Dr. Perry Kendall.

"Currently we're not aware of anybody with any illness," said Kendall, who noted avian influenza rarely affects humans who do not have direct contact with infected birds.

The virus does not pose a risk to food products that are properly cooked.

4th outbreak since 2005

The outbreak is the fourth in the Fraser Valley since 2005.

In 2009, an outbreak of avian flu in the same region led to the quarantine of several farms

In another Fraser Valley outbreak in November 2005, two duck farms were infected with the H5N2 strain of the virus.

In 2004, an H7-type flu transformed into a highly contagious strain. Farm after farm was quarantined until finally about 15 million birds — almost the entire valley poultry population — were destroyed.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-c ... -1.2857930

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 4:05 am 
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Avian flu on two B.C. farms kills thousands of birds
Two poultry farms in the Fraser Valley are under quarantine and thousands of birds are set to be euthanized.
Image

A worker loads duck carcasses onto a truck Tuesday after a bird flu outbreak forced the culling of poultry at a farm in Nafferton, England. An outbreak of avian flu was also discovered on two farms in B.C.'s Fraser Valley.
LYNNE CAMERON / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

By: James Keller The Canadian Press, Published on Tue Dec 02 2014
VANCOUVER—Two poultry farms in southwestern British Columbia are under quarantine and thousands of birds are set to be euthanized after the discovery of an avian influenza of the H5 subtype, provincial and federal agencies said Tuesday.
There weren’t any reported cases of transmission to humans and health officials had yet to determine the precise strain of the virus, including whether it is the dangerous H5N1 strain or another variation, H5N8, that is currently affecting farms in the Netherlands.
It also wasn’t clear how birds on the two farms, which are about eight kilometres apart, were infected.

Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, Canada’s chief veterinary officer, said tests were conducted Sunday after bird deaths were reported at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a chicken farm in Chilliwack, both located in the Fraser Valley east of Vancouver.

Kochhar said the Canadian Food Inspection Agency doesn’t yet know what N-subtype they are dealing with, which will guide their response.
“In terms of the pathogenicity, it’s still something we will have to test,” he said on a conference call with reporters.
“It is showing a heavy mortality in the poultry population that has been affected in the two barns. At this point, it’s rather preliminary to determine how serious it will be in terms of its spread and further control.”
B.C.’s provincial health officer, Dr. Perry Kendall, said those results should be ready by Thursday.
“Judging by the mortality rate, this is (a) high path (virus),” Kendall said after the conference call.
Pathogenicity does not indicate the level of danger a virus poses to people. So-called high-path avian flu viruses kill birds, while low-path viruses can reduce egg production.
The infected barn at the Abbotsford farm housed 11,000 turkeys that were to be slaughtered for the Christmas season — half had already died from influenza. The Chilliwack barn housed 7,000 chickens and about 1,000 of those were already dead.
The remaining birds will be euthanized using carbon dioxide and then composted inside their barns, said Dr. Jane Pritchard, B.C.’s chief veterinary officer. She said the compost can then be safely used on other farms.
Surveillance zones of up to 10 kilometres will also be set up around the infected farms and poultry in those zones will be tested, but the details of that surveillance hadn’t been finalized.
There have been avian influenza cases at farms in several Canadian provinces, though the most serious outbreak occurred in 2004 in B.C., also in the Fraser Valley, where the H7N3 strain of the virus spread to 42 commercial poultry farms.
Health officials ordered 17 million chickens, turkeys and other domestic birds slaughtered to contain the virus, which cost the provincial industry hundreds of millions of dollars and led to temporary trade restrictions on B.C. poultry.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2014 ... birds.html?

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 4:09 am 
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Avian flu detected at two Fraser Valley farms; up to 18,000 chickens, turkeys dead or to be destroyed (updated)
BRIAN MORTON, BETHANY LINDSAY AND TIFFANY CRAWFORD, VANCOUVER SUN 12.01.2014

Avian flu
As many as 18,000 chickens and turkeys are either dead or will be destroyed after the Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed cases of avian influenza at two Fraser Valley farms.

As many as 18,000 chickens and turkeys are either dead or will be destroyed after avian flu was found at two Fraser Valley farms, the same number that were culled from a single farm in Abbotsford during the early stages of a devastating outbreak in 2004.

In that outbreak — B.C.’s worst — the virus eventually spread to 42 farms and led to the culling of 17 million birds.

But industry experts are confident that measures introduced during the past decade will contain the latest outbreak at a turkey farm in Abbotsford and a broiler breeder farm in Chilliwack, and prevent widespread infection.

“B.C. is a world leader in developing practices that would help minimize the spread of any diseases,” said Michael Benoit, spokesman for the B.C. Turkey Farmers.

He said that visits to poultry farms are being kept to a minimum, and any visitors are logged in and out. Visitors are also required to wear disposable plastic boots to prevent cross-contamination, and delivery vehicles arriving at farms are washed and sanitized.

“We’re certainly monitoring the situation, and we’re certainly trying to do what’s best out there and ensure that we keep the spread of this disease to a minimum,” said Benoit, adding that farms are also providing disinfection foot baths for employees and visitors.

“At one farm, there was originally 11,000 birds, and over half have died from the disease,” noted B.C.’s chief veterinary officer Dr. Jane Pritchard in a conference call Tuesday after health officials said the presence of H5 avian flu was detected at the two farms.

“At the other farm, there were 7,000 birds and approximately 1,000 have died,” said Pritchard, noting that the birds were 83 days old and would have been targeted for the Christmas market. “The number of birds to be euthanized is a moving target at this point, but between the two farms 18,000 birds will have to be composted in the barns.”

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has placed the two farms under quarantine to control the spread of disease and further testing by the agency is underway to confirm the severity of illness and to determine the strain of the virus.

Results are expected within days.

Officials said the province will help with required carcass disposal.

The CFIA said initial tests for the disease were conducted on Monday at a Ministry of Agriculture laboratory in Abbotsford, after both operations experienced sudden deaths of birds during the weekend.

Avian influenza viruses do not pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked.

B.C.’s provincial health officer Dr. Perry Kendall said there haven’t been any reported cases of transmission to humans.

In the conference call, Dr. Harpreet Kochhar, Canada’s chief veterinary officer, said that there is no specific information on how the virus ended up at the two barns.

“There are multiple ways of transmission, either through migratory birds or through movement from infected barns to another, or from humans.

“We will have to undertake a full assessment of what is the cause.”

He noted that U.S. authorities have also been notified about the outbreak.

Kochhar said that to help ensure avian flu won’t spread, the CFIA will set up a primary control zone of between one and three kilometres around the infected farms.

“Beyond that, we would have up to a 10-kilometre surveillance zone where we would actually go out to the farms and do the testing by looking at the symptoms. But we are not at that stage where we’ve determined the surveillance zone and this will develop as we move forward.”

Pritchard said later that “the two affected farms immediately imposed a voluntary quarantine on their farms, and the industry-at-large immediately enacted bio-security precautions and measures to reduce the risk of additional cases.”

She said that “any movement of poultry within the surveillance zone will be severely restricted and require a permit from the CFIA based on a negative test result for the flock.”

She said that the birds will be composted within the farm, “so that nothing comes out and it can’t be airborne. There’s no remnants of the birds.”

Canada’s first human case of avian flu was confirmed in January, after an Alberta patient died from the virus. Officials say person-to-person transmission of avian flu is extremely rare.

During the avian flu outbreak of 2004, the virus was never detected in a person, but more than 17 million birds were culled in the Fraser Valley, making it the largest animal cull in Canadian history.

It cost farms and processors at least $312 million.

There was another, albeit smaller, cull in 2009, when 60,000 birds were euthanized at a farm in Abbotsford.

Meanwhile, Benoit said the cull isn’t expected to impact the availability of turkeys this Christmas, with growers expecting to lose less than 0.1 per cent of the 3.3 million turkeys British Columbians will consume over the holiday season.

“We’re very sad, but I’m sure that we’ll be able to ensure that there’s adequate turkeys,” Benoit said.

He added that consumers will “definitely not” see an increase in the cost of turkeys, pointing out that retailers usually offer birds at prices below the cost of production over the holidays.

bmorton@vancouversun.com

blindsay@vancouversun.com

ticrawford@vancouversun.com

http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/Avi ... story.html?

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 8:58 am 
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UPDATE: Turkeys to be destroyed after avian flu hits Abbotsford farm

by Tyler Olsen - Abbotsford News
posted Dec 2, 2014 at 12:00 PM— updated Dec 2, 2014 at 4:55 PM

An Abbotsford turkey farm and a broiler breeder chicken farm in Chilliwack are in quarantine after H5 avian influenza was discovered earlier this week.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said tests confirmed the disease Monday after both farms reported significant numbers of sudden deaths over the weekend.

Dr. Jane Pritchard, chief veterinarian officer with the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture, said about half of the Abbotsford’s farm’s 11,000 birds had already died from the disease, while 1,000 of the Chilliwack’s farm’s 7,000 birds have died.

“This is catasrophic for the individual farmers,” she told reporters.

The remaining birds will be euthanized and composted on site. Officials did not identify the afflicted farms.

Further testing is underway to determine the strain of the influenza and its pathogenicity (the severity of the illness in birds), but Pritchard said officials are treating it as if it was a high path strain.

It’s not yet known how the virus made its way onto the affected farms.

“At this point we have no direct connection between the two farms,” Pritchard said. The two farms are eight kilometres apart.



“There are multiple ways of transmission, either through migratory birds or movement of infected birds to another, from humans and other aspects,” added CFIA chief veterinary officer Harpreet Kochar.

The CFIA will be setting up a “surveillance zone” around the affected farms, within which it will conduct testing and limit access to ensure no other farms are infected.

While the radius of the zone has not yet been determined, Pritchard said officials estimate that between 50 to 75 farms will be affected.

The CFIA said avian flu does not “pose risks to food safety when poultry and poultry products are properly handled and cooked” and that the disease rarely affects humans not in contact with afflicted birds.

The turkeys were at an age at which they would likely have been destined for Christmas dinner tables.

In 2004, 17 million poultry were slaughtered after an avian flu with high pathogenicity spread through the Fraser Valley. While 14 million of those were able to be sold, three million diseased birds were destroyed.

More recent outbreaks of avian flu have been less serious.

In 2005, 60,000 birds were killed after a mild version of H5 was found at a Yarrow farm. In 2009, 41 farms were placed in quarantine and 72,000 birds were slaughtered after an H5 version was found on two farms in Abbotsford. That version of the flu was determined to be “of low pathogenicity.”

In 2008, the B.C. agriculture ministry unveiled a new $14-million lab in Abbotsford. Officials said the lab would allow the ministry to respond to disease outbreaks “faster and more efficiently.”

http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/284512881.html

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 10:15 am 
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Commentary

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 03, 2014 10:47 am 
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Animal health body calls for more spending on disease detection
Wed, Dec 03 09:22 AM EST
PARIS (Reuters) - More money needs to be spent on detecting disease in domestic and wild animals, an intergovernmental group said on Wednesday, following a series of bird flu outbreaks and previous mutations of animal viruses into ones that can be passed between humans.

The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) said governments had cut funding after previous health crises had abated, and needed to reconsider that decision in that light of recent outbreaks.

"Resources have been affected to other priorities. We must come back to appropriate levels to have an early detection of cases," OIE Director General Bernard Vallat told Reuters.

Vallat said animal producers, hunters, anglers and other users of the natural environment were also key players in early detection of viruses with whom it was important to cooperate.

Germany, the Netherlands and Britain have reported cases in recent weeks of the highly pathogenic bird flu virus H5N8, which is similar to one found in Asia earlier this year that led in South Korea to a massive culling of poultry flocks.

Canada said on Tuesday bird flu had killed thousands of turkeys and chickens in the province of British Columbia. That virus type was identified as H5 but the precise variant remained unclear.

The H5N8 strain -- as opposed to the H5N1 strain that sparked a health crisis a few years ago -- has never been detected in humans. But the Paris-based OIE warned influenza viruses could mutate, giving Ebola as an example.

Ebola was initially transmitted to humans by a wild animal before turning into a human-to-human pandemic, Vallat said. The disease had killed over 6,000 people worldwide by the end of last month, data from the World Health Organisation (WHO) show.

"All influenza viruses can mutate," Vallat said. "We need to be vigilant on the ground to quickly detect bird flu cases and avoid a spread of the virus ... and we need to monitor in labs any genetic change that could be worrying for humans."

The OIE said 75 percent of new human diseases were derived from pathogens transmitted by animals, whether domestic or wild.

(Reporting by Sybille de La Hamaide; Additional reporting by Tom Miles in Geneva; Editing by Mark Potter)

http://mobile.reuters.com/article/idUSK ... 3?irpc=932

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