Rhiza Labs FluTracker Forum

The place to discuss the flu
It is currently Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:51 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 11:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Canada has reported two H5 outbreaks in British Columbia. Unlike prior H5 outbreaks, these two outbreaks have produced a high mortality rate in turkeys and chickens, similar to results seen for the H5N8 currently circulating in Japan and Europe.

Prior surveys (in 2005) identified H5 in wild birds. However, these cases were low path North American strains, which are easily distinguished from Asia clades such as the Qinghai clase 2.2 or the two most relevant Fujian strains (clade 2.3.2 and 2.3.4. The current H5N8 sequences in Asia and Europe are clade 2.3.4.

However, dead duckling on Prince Edward Island which were H5 PCR confirmed suggested that H5N1 from Asia may have entered Canada previously.

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 11:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Initial Analysis of H5 in Wild Birds in Canada Causes Concern

Recombinomics Commentary
November 19, 2005

Two wild ducks in Manitoba have tested positive for H5N1 avian flu viruses, but not the dangerous form of the virus circulating in Southeast Asia, federal officials announced Saturday.

Two birds in British Columbia carried H5N9 viruses and five carried H5N2s. Two birds in Quebec carried H5N3 viruses. All were low-path viruses.

"None of these results, based on assessment to date, are of significant human or animal health concern," Dr. Evans said.

Analysis of the viruses carried by birds sampled in Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia have been completed, Evans said. Findings from Ontario, Alberta, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia have yet to be reported.


The above comments on intial data out of Canada clearly show that H5 in wild birds is widespread. So far all three reporting provinces are positive and the details above only describe 11 of the 207 birds positive for H5. The initial results were delayed because many isolates were mixtures, so there is more data being developed on other serotypes.

The above data indicates the current database of wild bird sequences isolated in Canada as represented by deposited sequences at GenBank is a poor representation of the current situation. Although there are over 100 sequences from Canada, only two are H5 (H5N9 from 1966 and H5N2 from 1980)......

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/11190 ... cerns.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 11:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
H5 Bird Flu Confirmed in Sick Gosling on PEI Canada

Recombinomics Commentary
June 16, 2006

A case of H5 avian flu has been confirmed in a gosling by the Atlantic Veterinary College.

Dr. Lamont Sweet, P.E.I.'s chief health officer, said in a news release there is no evidence the virus can be transmitted by eating poultry products, but anyone in contact with poultry needs to take special care.

The sick gosling was from a flock of 20 geese and ducks kept in the backyard of a private home in O'Leary.


The above comments on a confirmed H5 infection in a sick gosling are cause for concern. Distinguishing high pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) from low path (LPAI) is a relatively simple task. The HA cleavage site of HPAI has multiple basic amino acids, and the H5N1 of concern in Canada would be the Qinghai strain, migrating via the east Atlantic flyway. Virtually all Qinghai isolates have an HA cleavage site of GERRRKKR. This strain was initially identified at Qinghai Lake in May of 2005 and has since spread to southern Siberia, followed by migration to Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. The East Atlantic Flyway links northern Siberia, western Europe, western Africa, and northeast Canada. H5N1 in northeast Canada could then migrate to the south.......

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/06160 ... sling.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 11:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
PCR Insert Contains Key H5 Sequence from Dead PEI Goose

Recombinomics Commentary
June 21, 2006

Using polymerase chain reaction or PCR testing, the scientists searched for tiny bits of genetic material from flu viruses. They spotted enough to declare that they had found an influenza A virus of the H5 subtype.

`They found a little piece that matched the H5, enough of a little piece to say it's H5. However, they can't tell if the virus is alive or not,'' Bosse says.

But there wasn't sufficient material to tell if it was highly pathogenic or a virus of low pathogenicity, or what the neuraminidase _ the N in a flu virus's name _ subtype was.


The above description of testing on Prince Edward Island raises questions about the insert generated in the PCR test as well as the sequence of the insert. The tiny bits of genetic information described above are primers. The primers bind to the genetic information of the virus, and then the polymerase reaction fills in the gap between the primers using the virus RNA as a template. Thus, the insert contains the sequence of the virus and it can be used to identify the viral sequence between the primers.

This insert was specific for H5, so it almost certainly included the HA cleavage site. The sequence of the HA cleavage site is diagnostic for high pathogenic avian influence (HPAI) or low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI). Moreover, the GERRRKKR sequence at the cleavage site would indicate that the H5 was from the H5N1 Qinghai strain.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has maintained that the H5 in the dead goose was an incidental finding and the goose died of unknown causes. The key test of this hypothesis is the sequence of the HA cleavage site. If it has multiple basic amino acids, it is HPAI like the Qinghai strain of H5N1. If the multi-basic amino acids are missing, then it is LPAI bird flu, as suggested.

The isolation of H5 virus is unlikely because the samples at Winnipeg have degraded and are now PCR negative. In view of the state of the material in Winnipeg, the sequence of the insert created on Prince Edward Island should be released.....

http://www.recombinomics.com/News/06210 ... R_PEI.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 58 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group