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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 5:43 pm 
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Media cites the death of 8 linked to Ebola education team in Nzerekore, Guinea.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 5:43 pm 
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7 Killed While on Guinea Ebola Education Campaign
CONAKRY, Guinea — Sep 18, 2014, 5:35 PM ET
Associated Press
The prime minister of Guinea says seven bodies have been found in rural Guinea after a group of local residents attacked Guinean health workers carrying out Ebola awareness efforts in a rural area.

In an announcement made on state television late Wednesday, Mohamed Saïd Fofana said authorities had located the bodies a day after the group was abducted by assailants armed with rocks and knives.

Among the dead were three Guinean radio journalists who had been covering the education efforts.

An Ebola epidemic in West Africa first emerged in Guinea earlier this year.

Many residents of rural villages have reacted with fear and panic when outsiders have come to conduct awareness campaigns and have even attacked health clinics.

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wir ... QM.twitter

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 5:50 pm 
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18 September 2014 Last updated at 17:26 ET

Officials in Guinea searching for a team of health workers and journalists who went missing while trying to raise awareness of Ebola have found several bodies.

A spokesman for Guinea's government said the bodies included those of three journalists in the team.

They went missing after being attacked on Tuesday in a village near the southern city of Nzerekore.

More than 2,600 people have now died from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

It is the world's worst outbreak of the deadly disease, with officials warning that more than 20,000 people could ultimately be infected.

The three doctors and three journalists disappeared after being pelted with stones by residents when they arrived in the village of Wome - near where the Ebola outbreak was first recorded.

One of the journalists managed to escape and told reporters that she could hear the villagers looking for them while she was hiding.

A government delegation, led by the health minister, had been dispatched to the region but they were unable to reach the village by road because a main bridge had been blocked.

'Killed in cold blood'
On Thursday night, government spokesman Albert Damantang Camara said eight bodies had been found, including those of three journalists.

He said they had been recovered from the septic tank of a primary school in the village, adding that the victims had been "killed in cold blood by the villagers".

The reason for the killings is unclear, but correspondents say many people in the region distrust health officials and have refused to co-operate with authorities, fearing that a diagnosis means certain death.

Last month, riots erupted in the area of Guinea where the health team went missing after rumours that medics who were disinfecting a market were contaminating people.

Speaking on Thursday, President Francois Hollande said France was setting up a military hospital in Guinea as part of his country's efforts to support the West African nations affected by the outbreak.

He said the hospital was a sign that France's contribution was not just financial, adding that it would be in "the forests of Guinea, in the heart of the outbreak".

The World Health Organisation said on Thursday that more than 700 new cases of Ebola have emerged in West Africa in just a week, showing that the outbreak was accelerating.

It said there had been more than 5,300 cases in total and that half of those were recorded in the past three weeks.

The epidemic has struck Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Nigeria and Senegal.

A three-day lockdown is starting in Sierra Leone at 00:00 GMT in a bid to stop the disease spreading.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-29256443

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 5:55 pm 
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Eight dead following attack on Ebola team in Guinea

By Abby Phillip September 18 at 4:58 PM

The bodies of eight people, including several health workers and three journalists, have been found days after they were attacked while distributing information about Ebola in a Guinean village near the city of Nzerekore, according to Reuters.

"The eight bodies were found in the village latrine," Albert Damantang Camara, a spokesman for Guinea's government, told Reuters on Thursday. "Three of them had their throats slit."

When the delegation arrived on Tuesday to do disinfection work and educate people about preventing Ebola, angry and fearful residents began throwing rocks and the group and beating them with clubs according to Guinean radio reports in the LA Times. The delegation, which included one local politician, fled into the bush to escape their attackers.

One journalist who managed to escape told reporters that she could hear the people looking for her while she hid, according to the BBC.

On Thursday, the bodies were found in the septic tank of a primary school in the village, according to Camara. They had been "killed in cold blood by the villagers," he added, according to the BBC.

Throughout this epidemic, public health officials have battled widespread fear and even doubts that the virus exists at all. The deadly attack illustrates the danger that health workers face as they try to spread information about the virus in an effort to control the deadliest Ebola outbreak in history.

The attack occurred in an area near where riots broke out last month because people feared that workers disinfecting a market were contaminating people, according to the BBC.

Guinean radio reported that the attack came after the group tried to spray disinfectant to prevent the virus from spreading in public places, the LA Times reported.


Earlier, the governor of Nzerekore told the BBC that he believed the group was being held captive. A government delegation had been sent to the Wome (Wamey) village but was unable to gain access because the main bridge leading to the town was destroyed to prevent authorities from reaching it, the BBC reported.

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa began in a Guinea border town, Guéckédou, which is near where Tuesday's attack occurred. The spread of the virus in the country has not accelerated as quickly as it has in other affected countries, particularly Liberia.

But 33 percent of the cases in Guinea have been reported in the last three weeks, signaling that the outbreak is far from under control. According to the World Health Organization, at least 2,622 people have died and 5,335 have been infected in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Senegal.

[This post has been updated.]


Abby Phillip is a general assignment national reporter for the Washington Post. She can be reached at abby.phillip@washpost.com. On Twitter: @abbydphillip

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-y ... -attacked/

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 6:15 pm 
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Attack on Ebola workers in Guinea reflects challenges fighting virus

By ROBYN DIXON

When Guinean government officials visited the village of Womme in the country’s southeast, they planned to educate people about Ebola and show people how to avoid it – in a region where many still believe the virus doesn’t exist.

But it all went disastrously wrong.

Members of the local population responded furiously, pelting the delegation with stones and beating them with clubs, according to Guinean radio. The delegation, which included doctors and journalists, fled into the bush after the attack on Tuesday.

Radio reports said a local politician, two journalists and others hadn’t been heard from since they fled the attack.

Nine people are missing, according to Guinean government. Six members of the delegation were killed, according to local media, but government officials cannot confirm the report.

Twenty-one people were injured as youths attacked, stoning six cars, in an incident that underscores the challenges for local and international health teams fighting Ebola in West Africa.

Womme is outside the town of Nzerekore, which saw a similar protest in recent weeks.

Since Ebola surfaced in this region of Guinea in February (and perhaps as early as December), medical agencies have experienced resistance from some members of the population. Doctors Without Borders, the main agency working in West Africa to stem Ebola, declared there were at least 10 villages where it couldn’t work because of hostility from local people.

The World Health Organization announced Thursday that 2,622 people had died in West Africa, mainly in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, out of more than 5,300 reported cases. The epidemic has put ramshackle local health systems under intense pressure, leaving local populations with nowhere to seek treatment for other ailments such as malaria, to give birth, or even seek treatment for broken limbs.

Many health workers have fled their posts, afraid to work in an environment that has killed hundreds of local doctors, nurses and hygienists.

This is a time of terror in a number of West African communities as they face the world's worst outbreak of Ebola. The outbreak was first reported in Guinea in March and spread to Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and Senegal.

One reason the outbreak spread out of control in West Africa was terror of an incurable disease that kills more than half those infected and suspicion of outsiders who came to bring Ebola patients to hospitals. There was also alarm at warnings they should abandon long, deeply held and important burial rituals, such as washing the bodies of the dead.

Dozens of infected people went underground, evading treatment, and spreading the infection. In Liberia, Monrovia, rumors initially spread that Ebola didn’t exist. An intensive government campaign, depicting symptoms on posters around the city, gradually changed attitudes there.

But as Liberians flocked to seek treatment, they confronted a severe shortage of beds. The WHO said 315 beds available in Liberia are meeting less than 20% of demand.

In Monrovia alone, 1,210 beds are needed, but only 240 are available.

In Guinea’s southeast, a search team was sent to track down the delegation after the attack in Womme, but villagers destroyed a bridge leading to the village to prevent police or the military from gaining access, according to national radio.

"A team has been dispatched to verify more information," Guinean government spokesman Damantang Camara told Reuters.

One journalist who escaped the attack said she heard villagers hunting for delegation members, suggesting they may have been abducted, the BBC reported.

Guinean radio quoted one Womme resident saying that the delegation was attacked after medical workers sprayed disinfectant in order to control the spread of the virus in public places.

The assault follows similar attacks against medical workers or health officials in several other villages and towns in recent weeks. Last month, riots erupted after a medical team sprayed a marketplace in the same region as rumors spread it was a conspiracy to infect the population.

In Sierra Leone, government officials have ordered everyone to stay at home for three days in an effort to control the spread of the disease. International medical groups including Doctors Without Borders have criticized the measure, saying it will not contain the crisis.


Meanwhile, Doctors Without Borders said Thursday it had taken too long to evacuate a French woman working with the organization caring for Ebola patients in isolation wards, and she has now contracted the virus and was diagnosed Tuesday.

Brice de le Vingne, operations manager for the organization, said there was an unacceptable delay of 42 hours because the only aircraft equipped to transport the woman had to fly from the U.S. He called for an evacuation plane to be stationed in Monrovia, the Liberian capital and epicenter of the epidemic, where most new cases are emerging.

The WHO has warned that 20,000 people could be infected before the disease is brought under control.

The International Monetary Fund has announced plans to provide loans of $127 million to the three worst affected countries, to help them cope with the crisis.

Follow @RobynDixon_LAT for more news from Africa

http://www.latimes.com/world/africa/la- ... story.html

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 6:23 pm 
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Eight bodies found after attack on Guinea Ebola education team
CONAKRY Thu Sep 18, 2014 5:56pm EDT

(Reuters) - Eight bodies, including those of three journalists, were found after an attack on a team trying to educate locals on the risks of the Ebola virus in a remote area of southeastern Guinea, a government spokesman said on Thursday.

"The eight bodies were found in the village latrine. Three of them had their throats slit," Damantang Albert Camara told Reuters by telephone in Conakry.

However, Guinea's Prime Minister Mohamed Saïd Fofana, speaking in a television message that had been recorded earlier, said 7 bodies of 9 missing people had been found.


He said six people have been arrested following the incident, which took place on Tuesday in Wome, a village close to the town of Nzerekore, in Guinea's southeast, where Ebola was first identified in March.

Since then the virus has killed some 2,630 people and infected at least 5,357 people, according to World Health Organization (WHO), mostly in Guinea, neighboring Sierra Leone and Liberia. It has also spread to Senegal and Nigeria.

Authorities in the region are faced with widespread fears, misinformation and stigma among residents of the affected countries, complicating efforts to contain the highly contagious disease.

Fofana said the team that included local administrators, two medical officers, a preacher and three accompanying journalists, was attacked by a hostile stone-throwing crowd from the village when they tried to inform people about Ebola.

He said it was regrettable that the incident occurred as the international community was mobilizing to help countries struggling to contain the disease.

(Reporting by Saliou Samb; Writing by Bate Felix; Editing by Robin Pomeroy and Ken Wills)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/09/ ... JE20140918

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 6:25 pm 
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Bodies Found After Ebola Health Care Workers Go Missing In Guinea (UPDATES)
Posted: 09/18/2014 4:29 pm EDT Updated: 1 hour ago

A spokesman for the government in Guinea said on Thursday that eight bodies were found two days after a group of health workers and journalists went missing in the country.

The journalists and officials came under attack near the southern city of Nzerekore, close to the Liberian border. One journalist was able to escape and later told reporters that she could hear villagers looking for her.

The Associated Press said that the group "was doing disinfection and education on prevention methods" when it went missing.

Doctors and researchers trying to contain the Ebola outbreak, which is deadlier than all previous outbreaks combined, have run up against a population deeply suspicious of medical personnel. Last month, riots broke out in the same Guinean city over rumors that health care workers were infecting people with the virus.

The current Ebola epidemic has killed 2,630 people thus far, according to the World Heath Organization, although the number is believed to be higher in reality as many deaths go unreported. The epidemic shows no sign of slowing down. After first appearing in Guinea in late 2013 or early 2014, the disease has spread rapidly through Sierra Leone and Liberia, and also to Nigeria and Senegal. The U.N. has said it needs $1 billion to help contain it.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/1 ... 45140.html

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 6:27 pm 
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Bodies found after Ebola health workers go missing in Guinea
Team spreading awareness of deadly virus set upon by angry residents in remote village

Guinea officials said that they have found eight bodies after a team of health workers went missing during a push to raise awareness of the outbreak of Ebola which started in the country nine months ago.

Six members of the team – three journalists and the director and two senior doctors of the regional hospital – were set upon by angry residents in the remote village of Womey, where many remain in denial about the disease, or suspicious of foreign health workers. The six have been missing since Tuesday. Officials said all six were held captive, although attempts to reach them stalled after angry residents destroyed bridges leading to the village.

"The meeting started off well; the traditional chiefs welcomed the delegation with 10 kola nuts as a traditional greeting," said a local resident who was present at the meeting earlier this week and gave only his first name, Yves. "It was afterwards that some youths came out and started stoning them. They dragged some of them away, and damaged their vehicles."

A government spokesman, Damantang Albert Camara told Reuters: "The eight bodies were found in the village latrine. Three of them had their throats slit."

The Ebola outbreak across five west African countries has spiralled into the world's biggest ever epidemic, with more than 700 cases – out of roughly 5,300 overall – emerging in the past week alone, the World Health Organisation said on Thursday.

The WHO said there was a desperate shortage of health workers and supplies in an epidemic likely to last many more months. Health workers across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, where most of the cases are, have been periodically attacked by citizens in a region experiencing the deadly virus for the first time.

The district of Nzérékoré, where the team disappeared, exploded in clashes after health workers tried to spray the local market last month. Some 50 people were arrested, and two dozen police officers sent in to quell the riots were injured.

In Sierra Leone, almost 30,000 volunteers will go house-to-house to raise awareness of the disease during a three-day "lockdown", when residents have been asked to remain at home. Thousands of soldiers are to enforce the curfew, due to start at midnight on Thursday.

A sluggish international response to the crisis has picked up in recent days. The US will send 3,000 troops to Liberia to help provide desperately-needed boots on the ground in the country hardest hit by the outbreak.

France's president, François Hollande, said the former colonial power would set up a military hospital to help tackle the disease in Guinea.

After an emergency United Nations meeting on Thursday, Brice de le Vingne, director of operations at Médecins Sans Frontières, said: "Other countries must commit to deploying assets and staff to the affected region as soon as possible. It is impossible to predict if the current pledges are enough because we do not know how the situation will degenerate in the coming weeks. There is no response too large."

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014 ... ing-guinea

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 6:56 pm 
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Ebola Riots in Guinea Leave Seven Dead, Premier Says
By Ougna Camara September 18, 2014

Seven people were killed during rioting in Guinea as members of a mission seeking to educate the population about the Ebola virus were attacked by angry crowds, the West African nation’s premier said.

Those killed in the clashes yesterday in the southern N’Zerekore region included an evangelical pastor, Prime Minister Mohamed Said Fofana said in a televised address today. The delegation was seeking to raise awareness about the deadly viral disease, and encountered a “hostile reaction of citizens who continue to believe that Ebola does not exist, or that it was created to eliminate them,” he said.

Guinea, along with Sierra Leone and Liberia, is among the worst-hit countries in the Ebola epidemic, the worst outbreak of the disease in history. About half of the 5,000 people who’ve been infected have died, and the World Health Organization has warned that the infections may not have peaked. The U.S. is deploying about 3,000 soldiers to West Africa to help efforts against the virus.

STORY: Why the Ebola Crisis Won't End Without Military Intervention
Emmanuel Camara, a witness who attended the meeting in the village of Wome that led to the rioting, said the team led by the region’s governor was explaining how to prevent Ebola and avoid contact with suspected cases. Suddenly, a group of young people accused the delegation of spreading the disease in the village, Camara, who fled with his family to escape the violence, said by phone today.

“They attacked with stones and sticks,” he said.

Fofana said two members of the delegation remain missing, while six people have been arrested in connection with the attack.

STORY: Ebola Threatens to Hobble Three Countries, $13 Billion in GDP
To contact the reporter on this story: Ougna Camara in Conakry at ocamara@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Antony Sguazzin at asguazzin@bloomberg.net Ben Holland, John Simpson

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-0 ... emier-says

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 19, 2014 6:02 am 
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Fear of Ebola Drives Mob to Kill Officials in Guinea
By RUKMINI CALLIMACHISEPT. 18, 2014

The bodies of eight officials and journalists who went to a remote village in Guinea to dispel rumors about the deadly Ebola outbreak gripping the region were discovered after a rock-hurling mob attacked the delegation, claiming that it had come to spread the illness, a government spokesman said Thursday.

The delegation had left for the village on Tuesday for what was supposed to be a community event to raise awareness about the Ebola virus, said the spokesman, Albert Camara Damantang. When the angry crowd descended on them, he said, several officials managed to escape and alert their colleagues in Conakry, Guinea’s capital, who sent out a search party.

“They went on a mission to try to sensitize the local population about Ebola, but unfortunately they were met with hostility by people throwing rocks,” Mr. Damantang said.

In the delegation was a sub-prefect, a regional health director and a pastor “who came to offer solace, as well as several journalists from communal radio stations,” Mr. Damantang said. “Among the only survivors we found of those who tried to hide in the bush was the 5-year-old son of the sub-prefect, who was left hiding in the wild.”

The Ebola epidemic has already killed more than 2,600 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Governments have scrambled to figure out a way to contain it, but beyond their own limited resources, collapsing health systems and inexperience with the disease, they have faced another dangerous obstacle: distrust among the local population.

In Guinea, workers and officials, blamed by panicked populations for spreading the virus, have been threatened with knives, stones and machetes.

In Liberia, some politicians have publicly expressed doubts about the extent of the outbreak, and even accused the administration of exaggerating it to collect money from international donors.

Scores of health workers across the region have died trying to fight the disease, often in hospitals and clinics that lack basic supplies. But the killing of government officials, journalists and community leaders trying to curb the spread of the disease represents a dangerous new chapter in the efforts to contain the epidemic.

A version of this article appears in print on September 19, 2014, on page A15 of the New York edition with the headline: Fear of Virus Drives Mob to Kill Officials. Order Reprints|Today's Paper|Subscribe

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/19/world ... .html?_r=0

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