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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 6:29 am 
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Media reports indicate Kent Brantly will be released from Emory University Hospital after successful treatment and recovery from Ebola.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 6:30 am 
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Hospital to Discuss Discharge of Ebola Patients
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESSAUG. 21, 2014, 6:14 A.M. E.D.T.

ATLANTA — The Atlanta hospital where two American aid workers were brought after getting infected with the Ebola virus planned to hold a news conference Thursday morning to discuss their discharge while an aid group said one of them has recovered.

A news release from Emory University Hospital did not say when the two would be discharged or if it had already happened. A spokeswoman said more details would be given at the Thursday morning news conference.

Meanwhile, Franklin Graham, president of Samaritan's Purse, who one of the aid workers had been working for, said in a statement that Dr. Kent Brantly has recovered.

"Today I join all of our Samaritan's Purse team around the world in giving thanks to God as we celebrate Dr. Kent Brantly's recovery from Ebola and release from the hospital," Graham's statement said.

Brantly and Nancy Writebol were flown out of the west African nation of Liberia earlier this month and have been getting treatment for the deadly disease in an isolation unit at the hospital. The two were infected while working at a missionary clinic outside Liberia's capital.

The Ebola outbreak has killed 1,350 people and counting across West Africa.

Ebola is only spread through direct contact with the bodily fluids of sick people experiencing symptoms.

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2014/08 ... times&_r=0

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 6:46 am 
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VIDEO

Ebola Patient Dr. Kent Brantly to Be Released From Hospital

U.S. doctor with Ebola is ‘recovering in every way’TODAY


An American doctor who contracted the Ebola virus while working in West Africa will be released from an Atlanta hospital on Thursday, officials said. Dr. Kent Brantly, 33, worked with Christian aid organization Samaritan’s Purse in Liberia treating patients with the deadly virus when he fell ill. He and Nancy Writebol, an aid worker who also contracted Ebola while doing missionary work in Liberia, received experimental treatment before being flown to an isolation unit in Emory University Hospital in Atlanta in early August. Brantly was due to make a statement at an 11 a.m. ET news conference. Writebol, 59, is expected to be discharged from the hospital's isolation unit but it was not immediately clear whether she would also leave the facility.

Franklin Graham, president of Samaritan's Purse, said Thursday that he had "marveled at Dr. Brantly's courageous spirit as he has fought this horrible virus" and thanked staff at the hospital. On Friday, Brantly released a statement asking that people "continue to pray for and bring attention to those suffering in the ongoing Ebola crisis in West Africa." More than 1,300 people have died from the disease in the region, according to the World Health Organization, which has declared the Ebola epidemic a global health emergency.

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/ebola- ... al-n185626

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 7:03 pm 
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VIDEO
Docs Declare Ebola Patients Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol No Risk to Public
BY MAGGIE FOX

Doc Who Beat Ebola: ‘God Saved My Life’
NBC NEWS

Declaring his cure a miracle, a doctor infected with the Ebola virus while working to save patients in West Africa walked out of an Atlanta hospital on Thursday. Hospital officials said they released a colleague quietly on Tuesday at her request.

"Today is a miraculous day. I am thrilled to be alive, to be well and to be reunited with my family," Dr. Kent Brantly, 33, of Christian aid organization Samaritan’s Purse, told a news conference.

Nancy Writebol, 59, an aid worker who also contracted Ebola while doing missionary aid work in Liberia, was discharged from the hospital on Tuesday, according to Emory and the aid group SIM. She is spending private time with her husband. "As she walked out of her isolation room, all she could say was 'To God be the glory,'" Brantly said.

Brantly, who clutched the hand of his wife, Amber, before speaking, said he would be spending a month in private with his family before sharing any more of his story. "But for now we need some time together after a month apart," he said.

"Please do not stop praying for the people of Liberia and West Africa and for an end to this Ebola epidemic," Brantly pleaded in a brief statement. He hugged his doctors and nurses as he left, and officials at Emory and the CDC emphasized that the patients pose no risk to public health.


Dr. Brantly, Emory Team Hug It Out After Beating EbolaNBC NEWS



“After a rigorous course of treatment and testing, the Emory Healthcare team has determined that both patients have recovered from the Ebola virus and can return to their families and community without concern for spreading this infection to others,” Dr. Bruce Ribner, director of Emory’s Infectious Disease Unit, said at the news conference.

"We understand that there are a lot of questions and concerns about the Ebola virus and the infection that is causes. However we cannot let our fears dictate our actions," Ribner added. "We don't think he's contagious."

Franklin Graham, president of Samaritan's Purse, said Thursday that he had "marveled at Dr. Brantly's courageous spirit as he has fought this horrible virus" and thanked staff at the hospital. On Friday, Brantly released a statement asking that people "continue to pray for and bring attention to those suffering in the ongoing Ebola crisis in West Africa." More than 1,300 people have died from the disease in the region, according to the World Health Organization, which has declared the Ebola epidemic a global health emergency.

Both Americans received experimental treatment before being flown to an isolation unit in Emory University Hospital in Atlanta in early August. Ribner says there is no way to tell if it helped. "They are the very first individuals to ever receive this agent ... and frankly, we do not no whether it helped them, whether it made no difference or whether it delayed their recovery," he said.

Ribner said doctors would follow up on both Writebol and Brantly to make sure they continue to recover, and to watch for any side-effects from the treatment. They will almost certainly be immune to this particular strain of Ebola but it's not clear what immunity they may have to other, related strains of the virus.

In fact, both could return to Africa if their recovery continued. "We would anticipate immunity to this virus so that they would probably not be at risk of infection if they were caring for patients with Ebola virus disease during this outbreak," Ribner said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there is no concern for anyone with the release of the two patients. "They no longer have Ebola virus in their blood and therefore pose no risk to household contacts or the public. There are no restrictions to the patients' activities of daily living," CDC said in a statement.

Ribner said the hospital allowed Writebol to leave quietly and privately at her request. There was no need to tell the public because she poses no threat, he said.

"Nancy is free of the virus, but the lingering effects of the battle have left her in a significantly weakened condition," her husband David Writebol said in a statement. "Thus, we decided it would be best to leave the hospital privately to be able to give her the rest and recuperation she needs at this time."

F. BRINLEY BRUTON AND LEXI RUDOLPH CONTRIBUTED TO THIS STORY

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/ebola- ... sk-n185626

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 7:26 pm 
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Recovery of US Ebola patients renews focus on treatment
Filed Under: Ebola

Lisa Schnirring | Staff Writer | CIDRAP News | Aug 21, 2014

Kent Brantly, MD, thanked people for their prayers and praised the staff and other groups for the care he received.

Two medical missionaries who were infected with Ebola virus in Liberia and were evacuated to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta about 3 weeks ago have recovered and been discharged, with Kent Brantly, MD, thanking staff at a hospital press conference today.

In a surprise announcement, hospital officials said Brantly's colleague, Nancy Writebol, was discharged on Aug 19—quietly, at her request—and is spending time with her husband at an undisclosed location.

Officials confident patients pose no threat

The aid organization Samaritan's Purse, Brantly's employer, said in a statement that he ran out of the isolation unit giving high fives to his treatment team, who were lining the halls. The image of Brantly wearing an oxford shirt and khakis at the media briefing, where he and his wife hugged each of the medical staff members flanking him at the podium, contrasted sharply with media images from earlier this month of him gingerly entering the hospital in head-to-toe protective gear.

Bruce Ribner, MD, who led the team that treated Brantly and Writebol, said that after a rigorous course of treatment and rigorous testing, the patients can return to their families, communities, and lives without public health concerns. He said his team and federal health officials are confident that the discharges pose no threats.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said in a statement today that it is heartened to learn that the patients have been discharged from the hospital. "CDC has advised Emory University Hospital that there is no public health concern with the release of these patients. They no longer have Ebola virus in their blood and therefore pose no risk to household contacts or the public," the agency said. It added that there are no restrictions on the patients' daily activities.

The CDC said it has consulted with the Emory team and conducted lab tests to confirm that the patients no longer have Ebola virus in their blood. Patients who have recovered from Ebola virus disease (EVD) aren't contagious do not transmit the virus through their blood or other body fluids, the agency said.

At today's briefing, Brantly described the early days of his illness in Liberia, where he and Writebol worked in a busy EVD treatment center in Monrovia, the capital. He thanked people for their prayers, Samaritan's Purse for taking care of him and his family, and the medical staff at Emory who cared for him.

"Please do not stop praying for the people in Liberia and West Africa," he said.

Brantly said Writebol, as she was released from the hospital, asked him to share her gratitude. "As she walked out of her isolation room, all she could say was, 'To God be the glory,'" he said.

Writebol's husband David said in a statement today posted on the Web site of SIM, the missionary group that employed her, that the lingering effects of the disease have left his wife weak. "Thus, we decided it would be best to leave the hospital privately to be able to give her the rest and recuperation she needs at this time."

David Writebol flew to Charlotte, N.C., from Liberia on Aug 10 and completed his 21-day fever watch for EVD on Aug 16, SIM said.

Hospitalizations yield treatment insights

Ribner told reporters that most patients who survive EVD make a complete recovery, unless they have substantial organ damage. He said patients who recover are thought to be immune to the virus, but only to the strain of virus they had. There are five Ebola strains.

Emory's medical team learned a lot about treating the disease during Brantly and Writebol's hospitalizations, especially the importance of fluid and electrolyte replacement and insights on clotting problems, he said. The team is developing treatment guidelines to share with their medical colleagues in Africa as well as in medical journals.

Even though many clinics in West Africa's outbreak settings aren't able to measure electrolytes, it is important pay attention to replacing them, Ribner said.

According to media reports, the two patients were treated with the experimental EVD drug ZMapp while in Liberia, and Brantly reportedly received convalescent serum from a patient who had recovered from the illness.

Ribner said it's not clear if the treatments helped or what the long-term sequelae will be in the wake of the measures. He added that the two patients are scheduled for follow-up visits at Emory and that staff will monitor their conditions.

WHO meeting to tackle treatment topics

Meanwhile, the World Health Organization (WHO) weighed in on EVD treatment issues today, with the release of a statement that said clinicians in Liberia have reported that two doctors and one nurse have now received ZMapp.

The nurse and one of the doctors have shown marked improvement, while the condition of the second doctor is serious, but has improved somewhat, the agency reported.

The WHO said supplies of the experimental drug are now exhausted. It added that ZMapp is one of several experimental treatments and vaccines for Ebola and that supplies for all are extremely limited.

It announced that it will host a meeting on the experimental treatments on Sep 4 and 5 in Geneva to gather information about the most promising treatments and their role in containing West Africa's EVD outbreak, which has now sickened at least 2,473 people and led to at least 1,350 deaths, according to the most recent WHO statement.

Scientists will discuss safety and efficacy issues, along with possible ways to speed up clinical trials, the WHO said. The group will also explore ways to speed production of the most promising treatments.

On Aug 12 an ethics panel convened by the WHO to discuss the use of experimental therapies in the outbreak said it's ethical to use unlicensed drugs and vaccines to battle the outbreak, so long as certain conditions are met, such as patient consent. However, a few days later the WHO issued a statement seeking to cool high expectations for the experimental therapies.

See also:

Aug 21 Samaritan's Purse statement

Aug 21 SIM statement

Aug 21 CDC statement

Aug 21 WHO statement


http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspect ... -treatment

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 7:27 pm 
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Anecdotal evidence about experimental therapies

Situation assessment - 21 August 2014

Clinicians working in Liberia have informed WHO that 2 doctors and 1 nurse have now received the experimental Ebola therapy, ZMapp.

The nurse and one of the doctors show a marked improvement. The condition of the second doctor is serious but has improved somewhat.

According to the manufacturer, the very limited supplies of this experimental medicine are now exhausted.

ZMapp is one of several experimental treatments and vaccines for Ebola that are currently undergoing investigation. At present, supplies of all are extremely limited.

On 4–5 September, WHO will host a consultation on potential Ebola therapies and vaccines in Geneva. The consultation has been convened to gather expertise about the most promising experimental therapies and vaccines and their role in containing the Ebola outbreak in west Africa.

The expertise among the more than 100 participants is wide, ranging from pharmaceutical research and the clinical demands of Ebola care, to expertise on ethical, legal, and regulatory issues. More than 20 experts from west Africa are expected to attend.

Issues of safety and efficacy will be discussed together with innovative models for expediting clinical trials. Possible ways to ramp up production of the most promising products will also be explored.

Presentations about the real conditions and challenges in affected African countries are intended to anchor all discussions and shape the consensus advice that is expected to emerge.

WHO media contacts:

Gregory Hartl
Telephone: +41 22 791 4458
Mobile: +41 79 203 6715
Email: hartlg@who.int

Fadéla Chaib
Telephone: + 41 22 791 3228
Mobile:+ 41 79 475 55 56
Email: chaibf@who.int

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/ebo ... t-2014/en/

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 21, 2014 8:45 pm 
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For Immediate Release: Thursday, August 21, 2014
Contact: Media Relations
(404) 639-3286

Two U.S. Patients Recover from Ebola, Discharged from Hospital

CDC is heartened to learn that the two U.S. citizens treated at Emory University Hospital for Ebola have been discharged from the hospital and can rejoin their families and communities.

CDC has advised Emory University Hospital that there is no public health concern with the release of these patients. They no longer have Ebola virus in their blood and therefore pose no risk to household contacts or the public. There are no restrictions to the patients’ activities of daily living.

CDC provided consultation to the healthcare team at Emory University Hospital and conducted the laboratory testing of patients to confirm that they no longer had Ebola virus circulating in their blood. Individuals who recover from Ebola are not contagious as far as transmitting the virus through close personal contact with blood or body fluids such as urine, feces, sweat, or vomit.

At times people in Africa who have recovered from Ebola have found their communities reluctant to have them return out of fear that community members could catch Ebola from a person who has survived the illness. Based on available evidence, Ebola survivors have not transmitted the virus to others after it is no longer present in their blood.


http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/ ... tient.html

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2014 12:58 pm 
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Ebola's defeat: The treatment of two Americans offers hope
August 24, 2014 12:00 AM

By the Editorial Board
When Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol were airlifted from Africa to Atlanta’s Emory University Hospital in early August after contracting the deadly Ebola virus, some Americans questioned the wisdom of bringing them to the United States for treatment.

There was a fear that the virus, which is spread primarily through contact with the bodily fluids of the infected, would somehow outmaneuver modern medical protocols and migrate to the general public.

Real estate mogul Donald Trump saw an apocalypse in the making. His demand that the government seal the borders and consign any overseas American who contracted the virus to the mercy of the health care system in the country where they fell sick was, of course, ignored. Still, even sensible people were nervous about bringing Ebola patients back home.

Once stateside, both Dr. Brantly and Ms. Writebol were given effective drugs and treated in a sterile environment. They responded well to the therapy and eventually recovered. Both left the hospital last week, having survived a virus that has killed more than 1,300 people in Africa this year.

Credit the U.S. medical system for being able to contain and treat a fearsome virus like Ebola — and credit level-headed Americans for keeping their cool and welcoming these fellow citizens home to obtain treatment.

Ebola is justifiably feared, but it isn’t a death sentence for those with access to modern levels of care.



Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/opinion/edi ... z3BKUpViBi

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