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PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 7:04 pm 
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niman wrote:

Pixilated version of wounds of shooting victim

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A Liberian boy reels with pain after apparently being shot during clashes with Liberian security forces in the West Point area of Monrovia which has been placed into quarantine by order of the country's president

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 7:08 pm 
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niman wrote:
niman wrote:

Pixelated version of wounds of shooting victim

Image
A Liberian boy reels with pain after apparently being shot during clashes with Liberian security forces in the West Point area of Monrovia which has been placed into quarantine by order of the country's president

Non-pixelated version in NY Times slide show at link below (but no longer the zoomed version which undoubtedly had an effect)

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/21/world ... w-bna&_r=1

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 7:29 pm 
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niman wrote:
niman wrote:
niman wrote:

Pixelated version of wounds of shooting victim

Image
A Liberian boy reels with pain after apparently being shot during clashes with Liberian security forces in the West Point area of Monrovia which has been placed into quarantine by order of the country's president

Non-pixelated version in NY Times slide show at link below (but no longer the zoomed version which undoubtedly had an effect)

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/21/world ... w-bna&_r=1

Cropped zoomed non-pixelated version
Image
The boy screams in agony: The whole West Point slum has been turned into an open-air isolation ward

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 9:49 pm 
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In Liberia, a teenage boy died after being shot by security forces in West Point, a slum that was blockaded this week to stop the spread of Ebola, a Liberia government spokesman said Friday. Shakie Kamara was hurt in a clash with police and soldiers who sealed off their peninsula from the rest of Monrovia.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/2 ... 99062.html[/quote]
In Riots Sparked By An Ebola Quarantine, A Teen Is Shot And Dies
by MARC SILVER
August 22, 201410:06 AM ET
A teenage boy should not die from gunshot wounds to his legs.

But that was the fate of 15-year-old Shakie Kamara.

This week, people in the neighborhood of West Point were angry that they'd been quarantined — a government step to prevent the spread of Ebola to other parts of Monrovia, the capital city of Liberia. On Wednesday, crowds of protesters tried to get past the checkpoints.

Soldiers opened fire. Kamara was wounded.
Image
Shakie Kamara lies on the ground with a bullet wound in his leg and cries for help.i
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

The teen was screaming, crying for help. Photographer Tommy Trenchard was on the scene, covering the story for NPR. He took a picture of Kamara, then tried to get an ambulance to come. Trenchard called people he knew in Monrovia. They told him that even before Ebola struck, the country's health care system was a shambles. They didn't know how to find an ambulance.

After a half-hour, an army medic arrived to treat the wounded teenager.

He was eventually taken to Redemption Hospital, where he died yesterday. Dr. Mohammed Sankoh, the hospital's medical director, told The New York Times that the cause of death was loss of blood and hypothermic shock.

Liberia's Defense Minister Brownie Samukai had a different perspective. He said, "It was not a bullet that went down there. ... Due to the stampede he fell, and that's how he got wounded."

The people of West Point do not believe the government's story.

Either way, it is clear: A teenage boy should not die from a leg wound. But that's what happened in West Point this week. The story shows how Ebola can claim the lives of Liberians even if they are not infected by the deadly virus.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2 ... t-and-dies

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2014 9:51 pm 
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Image
Shakie Kamara lies on the ground with a bullet wound in his leg and cries for help.
/TOMMY TRENCHARD FOR NPR

http://www.scpr.org/news/2014/08/22/461 ... a-teen-is/

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2014 8:49 am 
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Thread including Shakie Kamara being treated by medic

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=12118

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 26, 2014 2:30 pm 
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DISEASE CONTROL

Fighting Ebola, and the Conspiracy Theories
AUG. 25, 2014
Continue reading the main story
Brendan Nyhan
@BrendanNyhan

Misinformation about politics may often seem silly — the immigration bill will give out free cars! — but the consequences of false beliefs in public health can be deadly.

In the developed world, myths about the risks of vaccines have enabled the resurgence of communicable diseases like measles and pertussis. And in developing countries, false beliefs have hindered efforts to fight H.I.V./AIDS and eradicate polio in countries like Nigeria and Pakistan.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/26/upsho ... 0002&abg=1

The latest example of the dangers of health misinformation comes from Western Africa, where the response to an Ebola outbreak in four countries has been hampered by conspiracy theories about its causes and phony rumors about how to treat it. False beliefs may not be the biggest obstacle to containing the Ebola outbreak, but they make an awful situation worse.

People in the affected regions have become especially distrustful of doctors, with some suggesting the disease is a hoax. A resident of a heavily affected area in Liberia told The Wall Street Journal last week: “I’ve never seen anybody die of Ebola. I’ve only heard of it. So it’s a rumor.” These beliefs are often based on conspiracy theories that the disease was invented by national governments in search of international aid or political power.

Photo

A crowd protested before entering the grounds of an Ebola isolation center in Monrovia, Liberia, this month. A mob of several hundred people chanting "No Ebola in West Point" opened the gates and took out the patients, many saying that the Ebola epidemic was a hoax. Credit John Moore/Getty Images
When a crowd, angered at a sudden quarantine and the transfer of patients, overran a clinic in Monrovia, Liberia, on Aug. 16, the idea that Ebola was a hoax played a role. The intruders, some of whom yelled, “There’s no Ebola,” not only came into contact with infected patients (many of whom fled) but also looted the facility of equipment. The gear may have included contaminated materials that further spread the contagion.

The effects of Ebola myths apparently extend far beyond Monrovia. With so many people dying after leaving home to receive treatment, some residents have come to equate the effects of the disease with efforts to respond to it. Raphael Frankfurter, an aid worker in eastern Sierra Leone, described hearing one woman saying about the hospital in Kenema: “Ebola is a lie! They’re sending people to Kenema to die!”

This kind of misinformation, along with fear of contagion, has led to some health workers’ coming under attack, being blocked from entering affected areas or being spurned by their own communities. Workers have also encountered conspiracy theories that Ebola was brought to the region by Westerners.

In addition, false claims are circulating about how to treat the disease. The World Health Organization issued a statement warning people against unproven treatments or supposed preventive measures, such as drinking salt water, which has reportedly killed several people in Nigeria.

Continue reading the main story
RECENT COMMENTS

newscast 2 11 minutes ago
Especially in Africa it is very important how you convey messageswithout putting blame on anybody. Since there is limitedreliable...
C Dunn 2 hours ago
It was neat to see some of the research showing that a lot of our irrational responses to threats is related to how our minds work when we...
Richard Navas 3 hours ago
Great article. Now we need to begin information and outreach campaigns in buffer nations surrounding west Africa as well as north Africa...
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As we’ve seen in the case of vaccines, circulating correct information about the causes and treatment of Ebola — as the W.H.O. and national governments are trying to do — has not been enough to erase these myths, particularly given the pace and scope of the outbreak and the lack of health facilities and workers in the region. A better approach (though harder to do quickly enough) is to work with trusted community leaders, as Dr. Marc Forget of Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) correctly emphasized.

CONTINUE READING THE MAIN STORY
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Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story
“We need to go to the thousands of small villages and repeat the message,” he said in an interview with CNN. “It has to be one-by-one contact that needs to be done through the chiefs, the local authorities, the youth. It is time-consuming and very difficult.” Such an approach has been used, for instance, in the fight against polio in Nigeria, where Muslim imams have been enlisted as advocates to help overcome local opposition.

In seeking to understand and address misconceptions about Ebola, it’s especially important to avoid the victim-blaming impulse, which may be exacerbated by negative Western stereotypes about African culture, as Mr. Frankfurter notes. Anyone facing such a terrifying outbreak would be panicked, distrustful of outsiders bearing a potential death sentence, and eager for any shred of hope.

In particular, research suggests that conspiracy theories can be psychologically reassuring in situations like this — seeing conspiracies in randomness or attributing negative events to enemies can restore feelings of control when people encounter unpredictable threats. Until we can help people feel as if the situation is coming under control, we shouldn’t be surprised if they try to regain psychological equilibrium however they can.

Brendan Nyhan is an assistant professor of government at Dartmouth College. Follow him on Twitter at @BrendanNyhan.

The Upshot provides news, analysis and graphics about politics, policy and everyday life. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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