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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 2:33 pm 
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Angry mob 'frees' 17 Ebola patients in Liberia
By: Joeri Vlemings - 08/17/14, 13u21 - Source: bild.de, Belga

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"No Ebola in West Point," shouted the hundreds of protesters in the poor neighborhood of Monrovia in Liberia. The crowd therefore "liberated" several potential patients isolated in a former school building layers. Among them are several confirmed cases of Ebola.

While there are already Alicante in Spain a suspected case of Ebola is examined, the disease in West Africa continues to rage unabated. In the district of West Point, which is about 75,000 people counts, in the Liberian capital Monrovia many believe in some kind of conspiracy or collusion: killing virus does not exist really in their eyes. Liberian Ministry of Health had reported earlier the whole district under quarantine want to place. So will prevent attract residents to other areas the government. "We will bring food and other goods to West Point, the measure takes effect," he said. Many citizens reacted angrily to the announcement. Shortly before the rush of the crowd was a hearse with four fatalities over driven under police escort. And last night was a dozen possible Ebola patients escaped, says a nurse, because the institution had no medication for them. died there over a thousand people to Ebola in West Africa. Liberia is the sad leader. Over 400 people have already died from the virus, according to figures from the World Health Organization (WHO).
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http://www.demorgen.be/dm/nl/990/Buiten ... eria.dhtml

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 2:46 pm 
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Patients missing after raid on Liberia Ebola clinic
Authorities in Liberia’s capital city, Monrovia, have warned of the spread of Ebola after a local clinic was ransacked. The patients quarantined there left the site and their whereabouts remain unknown.
Ebola West Point Slum
Police in Liberia's capital city had restored order by Sunday afternoon following a raid on a local Ebola clinic. However, they warned that local residents now faced a higher risk of exposure to the deadly virus, as the perpetrators had not only stolen infected items, but had also prompted patients to flee.
"They broke down the door and looted the place. The patients have all gone," Rebecca Wesseh, a witness to the incident, told the news agency AFP.
A police official speaking to the Associated Press news agency also described the incident, which took place on Saturday evening, as a "looting spree."
The circumstances surrounding the break in in the district of West Point remained unclear on Sunday. Witness accounts reported by news agencies suggested that a group of armed young men had attacked the quarantine center, claiming that Ebola was a fiction.
According to the Associated Press, the group stole a number of items that had visible signs of contamination, such as blood stains and excrement.
AFP reported that 17 patients had fled the scene after the raid on Saturday night.
The current outbreak of Ebola has become an international health emergency. In the six months since the first diagnosis of the current outbreak, about 1,145 people have died across Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria.
Officials in Kenya have announced a travel ban on incoming passengers from the West Africa countries hit by the epidemic.
kms/mkg (AP, AFP, dpa)

http://www.dw.de/patients-missing-after ... a-17859597

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 2:56 pm 
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(CNN) -- Gunmen attacked a facility treating Ebola patients in Monrovia, Liberia, on Saturday, and some patients fled, Liberian National Police spokesman Sam Collins told CNN Sunday.
No one was injured in the attack, he said.
All patients who ran away had Ebola, according to Collins, and some chose to stay at the facility.
Since an Ebola epidemic was declared in Guinea in March, the disease has spread to Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria. Ebola can be contracted by coming into contact with infected organs and body fluids such as blood, saliva, urine and other secretions.
Ebola outbreak worsens U.S. doctor risks life to fight Ebola Husband: Ebola patient 'getting stronger'
In the deadly disease's current outbreak in those countries, 712 people have died from Ebola and 1,310 people are Liberia confirmed to be infected with the virus, the World Health Organization reports.
Tolbert Nyenswah, Liberia's assistant minister of health, told CNN that as of Friday, 154 people in the nation have died from Ebola. There are more cases in which patients are suspected to have the disease, but that information has not been confirmed, he said.
Last week, Liberia's government said that sample doses of ZMapp, an experimental drug used to treat two American health care workers in Atlanta, Georgia, would be sent to Liberia to treat doctors who have contracted the virus.
The country had requested the drug, and the White House and U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved it.
ZMapp has not been tested for public use. Earlier, the company that makes ZMapp said its supply was exhausted after fulfilling a request of a West African country which it did not, at the time, name.
Nyenswah told CNN that the drug have already been given to three infected doctors in Liberia who have already taken doses of it.
Liberia has taken other measures to try to contain the virus.
In late July, it closed most of its borders and national campaigns have been launched to educate the public about how Ebola is spread and what to do if someone comes into contact with an infected person.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/17/world/afr ... um=twitter

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 2:58 pm 
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Liberian police depart after firing shots in the air while trying to protect an Ebola burial team in the West Point slum of Monrovia on August 16, 2014. A crowd of several hundred local residents reportedly drove away the burial team and their police escort. The mob then forced open an Ebola isolation ward and took the patients out, many saying that the Ebola epidemic is a hoax. Health officials say the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the deadliest ever.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 2:59 pm 
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A crowd enters the grounds of an Ebola isolation center in the West Point slum in Monrovia, Liberia, on August 16, 2014 . The mob was reportedly shouting, "No Ebola in West Point." The center, a closed primary school originally built by USAID, was being used by the Liberian Health Ministry to temporarily isolate people suspected of carrying the virus.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 3:00 pm 
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A health worker disinfects a corpse after a man died in a classroom being used as an Ebola isolation ward Friday, August 15, in Monrovia, Liberia. The virus has killed more than 1,000 people this year in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 3:01 pm 
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A boy tries to prepare his father before they are taken to an Ebola isolation ward August 15 in Monrovia.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 3:21 pm 
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Liberia's 'white shield' reminiscent of Black Death

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BY KAREN GRAHAM
10 MINS AGO IN HEALTH
+
Monrovia, Liberia's largest slum, West Point, was the epicenter of a looting spree late Saturday when looters broke into the quarantine center, taking bloodied sheets and mattresses and sending the 30 patients into the crowd.
There is a real fear now that the dreaded Ebola virus will spread through the slum and into the capital itself. Tolbert Nyenswah, the assistant health minister, said on Sunday the violence started because people were angry that people suspected of having Ebola were being brought from other parts of Monrovia to the holding center.
"All between the houses you could see people fleeing with items looted from the patients," the official said, adding that he now feared "the whole of West Point will be infected." One resident, Richard Kieh, said some of the items being taken were visibly stained with blood, excrement and vomit. West Point slum is home for more than 50,000 people.

Read more...
Attack on Liberia isolation clinic highlights Ebola denial
Ex-Seleka fighters massacre 'at least 34' in C.Africa villages
Missionary with Ebola repatriated to Spain has died
Even though Liberian officials say that the West Point slum has not been put under quarantine, according to the Associated Press today, in an attempt to further control the continuing spread of Ebola, the government has taken an unusual course of action by quarantining villages at the epicenter of the virus, creating a "white shield."
This action evokes images of the "plague villages" in Medieval Europe during the time of the Black Death. Residents of these villages have no access to food or medical supplies, literally no access to the outside world. They have the choice of staying, and possible starving to death or succumbing to illness, or sneaking away from the quarantine and spreading the virus even further.
President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf imposed emergency measures, including the community quarantine and a “cordon sanitaire,” a system of medical roadblocks to keep the virus contained and to stop its spread into more populated areas. Troops have been deployed under "Operation White Shield," to stop people from abandoning their homes and infecting others.
“There has to be concern that people in quarantined areas are left to fend for themselves,” said Mike Noyes, head of humanitarian response at ActionAid UK. “Who is going to be the police officer who goes to these places? There’s a risk that these places become plague villages.”
Aid workers are worried that if support doesn't arrive soon, the undergrowth that is already encroaching into the villages will eventually overtake and swallow what once were houses, turning the areas into a dense jungle again. Tarnue Karbbar, a worker for charity Plan International based in Lofa County in northern Liberia, says, “If sufficient medication, food and water are not in place, the community will force their way out to fetch food and this could lead to further spread of the virus."
Joanne Liu, international president of Doctors Without Borders, told reporters last week in Geneva, "We are not talking weeks; we're talking about months to get an upper hand on the epidemic." With the population uneducated in what the Ebola virus is, and what it can do, Liu said more international help is needed to "follow up on cases and educate the public about what the disease and the outbreak entails.''
The World Health Organization (WHO) said in a statement over the weekend that their staff members "at the outbreak sites see evidence that the number of reported cases and deaths vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak."
World Food Program spokesman Steve Taravella, in a telephone interview with The Age said over 0ne million people in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea are in need of food aid. Food, including cooked meals is being transported into those countries by truck. Not discussed were the logistics of how the food would get distributed once the trucks reached their destinations.
Fear is the biggest virus that needs to be contained right now. Ignorance of the disease, the scary way people end up dying, and belief in magical cures like hot water or nano-silver particles are all part of the myths surrounding the Ebola virus. Educating a population that is too frightened to listen will be the biggest task yet.


Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/life/heal ... z3Ag9Dq1XF

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 3:25 pm 
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Ebola Protesters Storm Liberia Health Centre Heightening Infection Fears
Huffington Post UK/AP
Posted: 17/08/2014 18:00 BST Updated: 1 hour ago Print Article

Liberian officials fear Ebola could soon spread through the capital's largest slum after residents raided a quarantine center for suspected patients and took items including bloody sheets and mattresses.

Up to 30 patients infected with the deadly virus fled the clinic after armed men broke into the facility shouting "There's no Ebola".

"They broke down the door and looted the place. The patients have all gone," said Rebecca Wesseh, who witnessed the attack at the centre in Monrovia told AFP.

Wesseh reported the men had shouted that President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf "is broke" and hinted she had invented the disease.

ebola

People watch police depart after driving out an Ebola burial team who had come to collect the bodies of four people who had died overnight

The violence in the West Point slum occurred late Saturday and was led by residents angry that patients were brought to the holding center from other parts of Monrovia, Tolbert Nyenswah, assistant health minister, said Sunday.

The BBC reported the blood-stained bedding, which had been looted from the centre along with medical equipment, was a serious infection risk.

Once the infected patients are located they will be transferred to the Ebola center at Monrovia's largest hospital, Nyenswah said. Some 10 more patients had 'escaped' the building the night before, according to a nurse, as the centre had no medicine to treat them.

"This is one of the stupidest things I have ever seen in my life", a senior police officer told the broadcaster.

The head of the Health Workers Association of Liberia, George Williams said the unit housed 29 patients who were receiving treatment, but although all had tested positive for Ebola, he did not know how many were still at large.

The isolation centre, a closed primary school originally built by USAID, was being used by the Liberian health ministry to temporarily isolate people suspected of carrying the virus.

A senior police official said West Point residents went on a "looting spree," stealing items from the clinic that were likely infected. The residents took medical equipment and mattresses and sheets that had bloodstains, he said. Ebola is spread through bodily fluids including blood, vomit, feces and sweat.

"All between the houses you could see people fleeing with items looted from the patients," the official said, adding that he now feared "the whole of West Point will be infected."

Some of the looted items were visibly stained with blood, vomit and excrement, said Richard Kieh, who lives in the area.

The incident creates a new challenge for Liberian health officials who were already struggling to contain the outbreak.

Liberian police restored order to the West Point neighborhood Sunday. Sitting on land between the Montserrado River and the Atlantic Ocean, West Point is home to at least 50,000 people, according to a 2012 survey.

Distrust of government runs high in West Point, with rumors regularly circulating that the government plans to clear the slum out entirely.

Though there had been talk of putting West Point under quarantine should Ebola break out there, assistant health minister Nyenswah said Sunday no such step has been taken. "West Point is not yet quarantined as being reported," he said.

Ebola has killed 1,145 people in West Africa, including 413 in Liberia, according to the World Health Organization.

Other countries across Africa are grappling to prevent Ebola's spread with travel restrictions, suspensions of airline flights, public health messages and quarantines.

Nigeria appears to be making progress in containing the disease. The country has 12 confirmed cases of Ebola, all of which stem from direct contact with the Liberian-American man who flew to Nigeria late last month while ill. He infected several health workers before dying.

Since then three others have died in Nigeria from Ebola, according to figures released over the weekend.

One Nigerian doctor has survived the disease and was sent home Saturday night and five others confirmed with Ebola have almost fully recovered, said the Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu in a statement Saturday night.

The most important part of containing the disease is to track all those who had contact with Ebola patients and to closely monitor them in order to quarantine if they show any symptoms. Nigeria had 242 people under surveillance but now 61 have been cleared and released, after completing the 21-day period without showing any signs of Ebola, said the health ministry.

In East Africa, Kenya will bar passengers traveling from the three West African countries badly hit by the Ebola outbreak. The suspension is effective midnight Tuesday for all ports of entry for people traveling from or through Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, said Kenya's Health Ministry. Nigeria was not included in the ban, which also allows entry to health professionals and Kenyans returning from those countries.

Following the government's announcement Saturday, Kenya Airways said it would suspend flights to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Kenya Airways, a major transport provider in Africa flies more than 70 flights a week to West Africa.

Several airlines have already suspended flights to Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, including British Airways, Emirates Airlines, Arik Air and ASKY Airlines.

Officials in Cameroon, which borders Nigeria, announced Friday it would suspend all flights from all four Ebola-affected countries. Korean Air announced on Thursday it would temporarily halt its service to Kenya despite the fact there are no cases of Ebola in the country.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/08 ... 85882.html

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 17, 2014 9:11 pm 
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New, Larger Ebola Center Opens in Liberia
By SHERI FINKAUG. 17, 2014
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A worker prepared the new Doctors Without Borders Ebola treatment center near Monrovia, Liberia, on Sunday. Credit John Moore/Getty Images

Doctors Without Borders began accepting patients on Sunday at what is intended to be the organization’s largest-ever Ebola treatment center, near Liberia’s capital, Monrovia.

The opening came a day after an improvised holding center at a former school in the densely packed West Point neighborhood of Monrovia was overrun by protesters who broke through the gates and carried away patients and supplies, including contaminated mattresses.

On Sunday, the community’s elders and leadership apologized for the disturbance, and public health workers hoped to reopen the West Point center on Monday, said Samuel Tarplah, 48, a nurse who ran it. “I believe we will get all the patients back,” he added.

The new Doctors Without Borders treatment unit, a series of large white tents on the grounds of the Eternal Love Winning Africa mission hospital in Paynesville, is designed to hold an initial 120 patients and then to be expanded to accept up to 400.

“I think it will be full very fast, and the situation will continue to get worse,” said Lindis Hurum, a project coordinator for Doctors Without Borders in Monrovia. “In general it is a very difficult and alarming situation. I can’t stress it enough.”


A treatment center in the north of the country, in Lofa County, was also overwhelmed with at least 140 patients on Saturday, Ms. Hurum said. Her group has only about nine doctors and nurses from outside the country working in Liberia, she said.

The Health Ministry reported that, as of Friday, 450 people who had or were suspected to have had the disease had died.

On Sunday, patients with symptoms of Ebola waited outdoors on the hospital grounds as a storm battered the city with rain. At least nine patients were admitted to the new unit, which Doctors Without Borders said would be scaled up gradually as staffing allowed.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, in an interview last week, said she hoped the new unit, and a smaller one at John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital in the capital area that was scheduled to open Sunday, would relieve the space problem.

The rush of people reporting for testing and isolation has come in part, doctors say, from increased public awareness messages in the media .

“In our society, it’s very difficult, with a family member in the home, that they will not attempt to help,” Mrs. Johnson Sirleaf said in the interview. “Our culture is to shake hands, to hug, to help.”

How some modern technologies — from airport screening to cellphones — may help in the fight to contain the Ebola virus. Video Credit By Emily B. Hager and Christian Roman on Publish Date August 16, 2014.
Liberian health officials opened the West Point center last week to provide a place for people exposed to Ebola or showing symptoms to be isolated and tested, to avoid passing the virus to their family members, which spreads through contact with body fluids.

Dr. Walter T. Gwenigale, Liberia’s minister of health, said that the protesters had been angry because patients from outside West Point had been brought there. “We had promised them we would not take people from other areas into their community,” he said. “We didn’t have other places to take people.”

Dr. Gwenigale said that one of the most pressing issues for the country was regular health care. Many hospitals have shut down because patients fear contracting Ebola at them.

Making matters worse, protective gear was not yet reaching hospitals in sufficient amounts.

“Without these gloves and all, we are all very scared to see patients at all,” said Dr. Jimi Benson, founder and director of Benson Hospital in Paynesville.

Dr. Benson said that patients were reporting to the hospital with symptoms suggesting Ebola, but that could be other illnesses. “If we are not well dressed, that means we are taking a chance. There’s no sign for us to know that this patient coming in is an Ebola patient.”

He said some staff members, whose families had beseeched them not to report to work, “are saying: ‘I’m going. I take oath to help my people.’ ”

Dr. David Nabarro, who was appointed last week to coordinate the United Nations’ Ebola response, wrote in a text message on Sunday that the people most at risk of the disease and those fighting it had showed “courage and dedication.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/18/world ... c=rss&_r=1

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