Rhiza Labs FluTracker Forum

The place to discuss the flu
It is currently Tue Oct 17, 2017 6:15 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 8:54 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Ebola Virus: Nurse Dies, Other Hospital Workers Stricken
Five Other Cases of the Disease Confirmed in Lagos, Sub-Saharan Africa's Largest City

By GBENGA AKINGBULE in Anuja, Nigeria and DREW HINSHAW in Accra, Ghana CONNECT
Updated Aug. 6, 2014 8:19 a.m. ET

A nurse in Nigeria died from Ebola and five other hospital workers have been confirmed as infected with the virus, Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said Wednesday, escalating the epidemiological toll from a single airline passenger.

The late nurse, and all of the other infected Nigerians thus far, each helped treat Patrick Sawyer, a Liberian-American consultant who fell sick during his air travel between Monrovia, Liberia, and Lagos, Nigeria, Mr. Chukwu said. They have all been put into an isolation unit, he added.

Their infections show how a single patient's reluctance to concede he had Ebola has brought fatal consequences to the health workers at the very center of West Africa's fight against the virus.

Mr. Sawyer's arrival on July 20 marked the first case of Ebola in Africa's most populous nation, though medical staff didn't know it at the time: For two days, Mr. Sawyer told his caregivers that he had malaria, even though his sister had recently died from Ebola, Lagos officials have said. But blood tests confirmed Mr. Sawyer had contracted Ebola.

That confirmation sparked a race to track down, monitor and, where necessary, isolate scores of flight attendants, passengers, airport workers and hospital staff who may have had infectious contact with Mr. Sawyer, who died on July 25.

City health officials believe those measures will prevent a further outbreak of Ebola in Africa's largest city, a megalopolis of up to 21 million people, at least from the current infection, and authorities are setting up tent camps in all of Nigeria's 36 states to isolate any further cases, said Mr. Chukwu, the health minister.

Still, Nigerian officials were too late to prevent the spread of Mr. Sawyer's illness to the people who cared for him in the early hours of his arrival.

"I wish to reassure Nigerians that the government is working hard to ensure the containment of the outbreak," the health minister said.

More than 800 people have died in the worst Ebola outbreak in history, which began in the forested interior of Guinea. A sizable number of the dead have been West African health workers, working extremely long days, in dangerous conditions, in rundown hospitals, said Michael Stulman, information officer for Catholic Relief Services.

Even where medical staff know they're dealing with Ebola, and take precautions, that stress of coping with so many Ebola patients in dire condition opens room for mistakes, he said. "The doctors and nurses who are working on the front lines are working in a particularly high-risk environment. It's possible for someone to slip up and become infected. That's been a major challenge."

Write to Drew Hinshaw at drew.hinshaw@wsj.com

http://online.wsj.com/articles/nigerian ... 1407325187

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 9:01 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Ebola: Nigerian nurse killed by virus as suspected Saudi patient dies
Associated Press and Reuters
Published Wednesday, Aug. 06 2014, 8:41 AM EDT
Last updated Wednesday, Aug. 06 2014, 8:45 AM EDT

A Nigerian nurse has died of Ebola and the country has five other confirmed cases of the disease, Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said Wednesday.

The nurse had treated a man who flew into Lagos and later died of Ebola last month, Chukwu said in a statement handed to reporters in Abuja, the capital.

He said the five confirmed Ebola patients are being treated in isolation in Lagos, sub-Saharan Africa’s largest city, with 21 million people. Chukwu said officials are setting up an emergency centre in Lagos to deal with Ebola which will be “fully functional” Thursday.

NIGERIA: NURSE DIES, MORE CASES CONFIRMED

A Saudi Arabian man suspected of having contracted the Ebola virus during a recent business trip to Sierra Leone died early on Wednesday in Jeddah, the Health Ministry said.

Saudi authorities and international laboratories certified by the World Health Organization are testing samples from the man for Ebola and other diseases after he showed symptoms of viral haemorrhagic fever, the ministry said in a statement.

The ministry said it was working to trace the man’s route of travel and identify people he was in contact with.

The kingdom has suspended pilgrimage visas from West African countries to counter the further possible spread of the disease.

SPAIN: PLANS TO EVACUATE INFECTED PRIEST FROM LIBERIA

Spain’s Defence Ministry said a medically-equipped Airbus 310 is ready to fly to Liberia to repatriate a Spanish missionary priest who has Ebola. The ministry said Wednesday preparations for the flight are being finalized but it is not yet known at what time the plane would take off.

The priest, Miguel Pajares, is one of three missionaries being kept in isolation at the San Jose de Monrovia Hospital in Liberia who has tested positive for the virus, Spain’s San Juan de Dios hospital order, a Catholic humanitarian group that runs hospitals around the world, said Tuesday.

Follow us on Twitter: @Globe_Health
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/hea ... e19928534/

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 9:18 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Nigerian Nurse Who Treated Ebola Patient Dies Of The Disease
AP | By BASHIR ADIGUN and KRISTA LARSON
Posted: 08/06/2014 8:19 am EDT Updated: 11 minutes ago

ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) — A Nigerian nurse who treated a man with Ebola is now dead and five other people are sick with one of the world's most virulent diseases after coming into contact with him, the country's health minister said Wednesday.

The growing number of cases in Lagos, a megacity of some 21 million people, comes as authorities acknowledge they did not treat Patrick Sawyer as an Ebola patient and isolate him for the first 24 hours after his arrival in Nigeria last month. Sawyer, a 40-year-old American of Liberian descent with a wife and three young daughters in Minnesota, was traveling on a business flight to Nigeria when he fell ill.

The death of the unidentified nurse marks the second Ebola death in Nigeria, and is a very worrisome development since it is the Africa's most populous country and Lagos, where the deaths occurred, one of its biggest cities.


Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia's Health Ministry says a man who was being tested for the Ebola virus and has died. The 40-year-old returned on Sunday from Sierra Leone, where there has been an Ebola outbreak, and was then hospitalized in Jiddah after showing symptoms of the viral hemorrhagic fever.

Spain's Defense Ministry said a medically-equipped Airbus 310 is ready to fly to Liberia to repatriate a Spanish missionary priest who has Ebola. The ministry said Wednesday preparations for the flight are being finalized but it is not yet known at what time the plane would take off.

The priest, Miguel Pajares, is one of three missionaries being kept in isolation at the San Jose de Monrovia Hospital in Liberia who has tested positive for the virus, Spain's San Juan de Dios hospital order, a Catholic humanitarian group that runs hospitals around the world, said Tuesday.

Ebola, which has no proven vaccine or treatment, has killed nearly 900 people this year in Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia and Nigeria and health officials in many countries are struggling to halt its spread.

Health experts say those medical workers in Nigeria now infected from Sawyer would not have been contagious to their neighbors or family members until they started showing symptoms of their own. The delay in enforcing infection control measures, though, is another setback in the battle to stamp out the worst Ebola outbreak in history.

The specter of the virus spreading through Nigeria is particularly alarming, said David Morse, an epidemiology professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.

"It makes you nervous when so many people are potentially at risk," he said.

Lagos is a bewildering combination of wealth and abject poverty, awash in luxury SUVs and decrepit buses alike that carry passengers through hours of crowded traffic on the bridges linking the city's islands to the mainland.

Ebola can only be transmitted through direct contact with the bodily fluids of someone who is sick — blood, semen, saliva, urine, feces or sweat. Millions live in cramped conditions without access to flushable toilets, and signs posted across the megacity tell people not to urinate in public.

Authorities in Liberia said Sawyer's sister had recently died of Ebola, though Sawyer said he had not had close contact with her while she was ill.

In announcing his death, Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu maintained that Nigerian officials had been vigilant.

"It was right there (at the airport) that the problem was noticed because we have maintained our surveillance," he told reporters. "And immediately, he went into the custody of the port health services of the federal ministry of health so there was no time for him to mingle in Lagos. He has not been in touch with any other person again since we took him from the airport."

On Tuesday, the Lagos state health commissioner said, however, that they did not suspect Ebola immediately and it was only after about 24 hours in the hospital that they identified him as a possible Ebola case.

Lagos state health commissioner Jide Idris said Tuesday that the nature of his disease "was not known" the first day.

"They went back to the history and they were like 'Oh, this is Liberia,' and that's why he was put into isolation," he told reporters. "So even in that window period it was possible that some of these people got infected."

Sawyer, who had a fever and was vomiting, was coming from the infected country of Liberia but had a layover in Togo. As a result, officials may not have initially known his original destination.

Experts say people infected with Ebola can spread the disease only through their bodily fluids and after they show symptoms. Since the incubation period can last up to three weeks, some of the Nigerians who treated Sawyer are only now showing signs of illness that can mimic many common tropical illnesses — fever, muscle aches and vomiting.

The national health minister on Wednesday said special tents would be used to speed up the establishment of isolation wards in all of Nigeria's states. Authorities also were setting up an emergency center to deal with Ebola that would be "fully functional" by Thursday.

"We are embarking on recruiting additional health personnel to strengthen the team who are currently managing the situation in Lagos," said his statement.

___

Larson reported from Dakar, Senegal. Associated Press writers Maram Mazen in Lagos, Nigeria and Mike Stobbe in New York contributed to this report.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/0 ... mg00000067

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 9:41 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Ebola outbreak: nurse who treated first victim in Nigeria dies
Nurse and five other people now battling the virus had helped care for Liberian-American Patrick Sawyer, who died from Ebola

Monica Mark in Lagos

A nurse who treated Nigeria's first Ebola victim has died of the virus in Lagos as five new cases of the highly lethal disease were confirmed in Africa's most populous nation.

The nurse had helped care for Patrick Sawyer, a 40-year-old Liberian-American civil servant who last month visited from Liberia, one of three countries in the region hit by the world's biggest epidemic. The five new cases are believed to be other health workers who came into contact with Sawyer, who died within days of his arrival.

The total death toll from the Ebola outbreak has now risen to 932 after another 45 patients died between 2 and 4 August, the World Health Organisation said.

"Yesterday the first known Nigerian to die of Ebola was recorded. This was one of the nurses that attended to the Liberian. The other five [newly confirmed] cases are being treated at an isolation ward," the Nigerian health minister, Onyebuchi Chukwu, told reporters in the capital, Abuja, on Wednesday.

Officials initially downplayed the risk of exposure, saying Sawyer had been immediately isolated when he collapsed on arrival at Lagos's bustling main airport two weeks ago.

But the state health commissioner, Jide Idris, on Tuesday said Ebola was diagnosed only after Sawyer had been taken to hospital and had had direct or indirect contact with at least 70 others. They include airline passengers, airport officials and health workers, and have all been placed under precautionary surveillance. Seven have been quarantined.

Officials told reporters they were compiling a list of secondary contacts, and appealed to those who believed they may be at risk to come forward. "This is a call for everyone to be vigilant, especially with regard to relating to people who are ill," Idris said.

The virus has an incubation period of up to 21 days, meaning symptoms do not necessarily show before then. Once transmitted through contact with the bodily fluids of infected persons, meat or surfaces, a fever quickly degenerates into internal and external bleeding, vomiting and diarrhoea, which all contain vast amounts of the pathogen.

A committee has been set up to deal with any potential escalation of the disease, although Nigerian officials admitted there was a shortage of doctors willing to work directly with confirmed cases. "Our doctors are worried about the danger it poses to their lives and the need to be reassured," said Tope Ojo, Lagos chairman of the Nigerian Medical Association.

Doctors and healthcare workers on the frontline have been the hardest hit during the outbreak, which has so far killed 887 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Authorities said they were considering applying for an experimental drug used on two Americans to treat the doctor who headed Sawyer's team and is now battling the virus herself.

Other preventive measures have been unveiled across Nigeria. Lagos, a melting pot of 20 million people, has broadcast information on radios and through leaflets, distributed protective clothing to health workers and set up four isolation wards.

In the northern state of Kaduna, officials said corpses from outside the country would require special permission for burial. Two suspected Ebola-infected corpses in the southern states of Anambra and Akwa Ibom are believed to be victims flown in from Guinea. Authorities have sealed the morgues while samples are being tested.

This week, troops were deployed in Sierra Leone and Liberia to help protect medical workers and quarantine the villages at the centre of the epidemic.

In Ivory Coast, a regional athletic contest due to be held this month has been cancelled. "There was really no benefit in holding the games until things are under control. We don't want to trigger hysteria," sports minister Alain Lobognon said.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/a ... CMP=twt_gu

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 10:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
EBOLA DEATH TOLL REACHES 932; 1,700 CASES: WHO
By BASHIR ADIGUN and KRISTA LARSON
— Aug. 6, 2014 10:40 AM EDT

ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) — A Nigerian nurse who treated a man with Ebola is now dead and five others are sick with one of the world's most virulent diseases, authorities said Wednesday as the death toll rose to at least 932 people in four West African countries.

The growing number of cases in Lagos, a megacity of some 21 million people, comes as authorities acknowledge they did not treat Patrick Sawyer as an Ebola patient and isolate him for the first 24 hours after his arrival in Nigeria last month. Sawyer, a 40-year-old American of Liberian descent with a wife and three young daughters in Minnesota, was traveling on a business flight to Nigeria when he fell ill.

The death of the unidentified nurse marks the second Ebola death in Nigeria, and this worries health experts as it is the Africa's most populous country and Lagos, where the deaths occurred, one of its biggest cities.

Ben Webster, a Red Cross disaster response manager in London, said it is "critically important" that people displaying symptoms are identified quickly.

"It's impossible to say whether this specific situation could have been avoided, but there is certainly more likelihood of travelers coming from an Ebola-affected country in the region and authorities need to be aware, even if the infrastructure and situation is challenging."

In Saudi Arabia officials say a man who was being tested for the Ebola virus has died. The 40-year-old returned on Sunday from Sierra Leone, where at least 286 people have died from Ebola, and was then hospitalized in Jiddah after showing symptoms of the viral hemorrhagic fever.

Spain's Defense Ministry, meanwhile, said a medically-equipped Airbus 310 is ready to fly to Liberia to repatriate a Spanish missionary priest who has Ebola. The ministry said Wednesday that preparations for the flight are being finalized but it is not yet known what time the plane will take off.

The priest, Miguel Pajares, is one of three missionaries being kept in isolation at the San Jose de Monrovia Hospital in Liberia who have tested positive for the virus, Spain's San Juan de Dios hospital order, a Catholic humanitarian group that runs hospitals around the world, said Tuesday.

There have now been at least 1,711 cases of Ebola this year, which has no proven vaccine or treatment, according to new figures released Wednesday by the World Health Organization. More than 932 people have died in Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia and Nigeria as of Aug. 4, WHO said. In announcing the new deaths, WHO noted in particular that "community resistance remains high" in Liberia. Many fearful family members are refusing to bring sick relatives to isolation centers, preferring to treat them at home and pray for their survival as no proven cure or treatment exists for Ebola.

The difficulties in quarantining sick people are complicating efforts to stop Ebola's spread.

In Nigeria, the five people now infected from Sawyer would not have been contagious to their neighbors or family members until they started showing symptoms of their own, health experts say. The delay in enforcing infection control measures, though, is another setback in the battle to stamp out the worst Ebola outbreak in history.

The specter of the virus spreading through Nigeria is particularly alarming, said Stephen Morse, an epidemiology professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.

"It makes you nervous when so many people are potentially at risk," he said.

Lagos is a bewildering combination of wealth and abject poverty, awash in luxury SUVs and decrepit buses alike that carry passengers through hours of crowded traffic on the bridges linking the city's islands to the mainland.

Ebola can only be transmitted through direct contact with the bodily fluids of someone who is sick — blood, semen, saliva, urine, feces or sweat. Millions live in cramped conditions without access to flushable toilets, and signs posted across the megacity tell people not to urinate in public.

Authorities in Liberia said Sawyer's sister had recently died of Ebola, though Sawyer said he had not had close contact with her while she was ill.

In announcing his death, Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu maintained that Nigerian officials had been vigilant.

"It was right there (at the airport) that the problem was noticed because we have maintained our surveillance," he told reporters. "And immediately, he went into the custody of the port health services of the federal ministry of health so there was no time for him to mingle in Lagos. He has not been in touch with any other person again since we took him from the airport."

On Tuesday, the Lagos state health commissioner said, however, that they did not suspect Ebola immediately and it was only after about 24 hours in the hospital that they identified him as a possible Ebola case.

"They went back to the history and they were like 'Oh, this is Liberia,' and that's why he was put into isolation," Lagos state health commissioner Jide Idris told reporters. "So even in that window period it was possible that some of these people got infected."

Nigeria was among the countries present at a regional meeting of health officials in Ghana at the beginning of July where they agreed to step up surveillance of potential Ebola cases and quickly share information with the World Health Organization.

Sawyer, who had a fever and was vomiting on the plane, was coming from the infected country of Liberia but had a layover in Togo. As a result, officials may not have initially known his original point of departure and it was unclear whether he was traveling on a Liberian or American passport.

Experts say people infected with Ebola can spread the disease only through their bodily fluids and after they show symptoms. Since the incubation period can last up to three weeks, some of the Nigerians who treated Sawyer are only now showing signs of illness that can mimic many common tropical illnesses — fever, muscle aches and vomiting.

The national health minister on Wednesday said special tents would be used to speed up the establishment of isolation wards in all of Nigeria's states. Authorities are setting up an emergency center in Lagos to deal with Ebola that will be "fully functional" by Thursday, he said.

"We are embarking on recruiting additional health personnel to strengthen the team who are currently managing the situation in Lagos," said his statement.

___

Larson reported from Dakar, Senegal. Associated Press Medical Writers Maria Cheng in London and Mike Stobbe in New York contributed to this report.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/nigerian ... died-ebola

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 11:43 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Ebola death toll hits 932 as Saudi man being tested dies
Nigerian nurse is the second to die of the disease in that country, as fears mount about further spread of deadly virus
August 6, 2014 9:30AM ET

Saudi Arabia's Health Ministry says a man who was being tested for the Ebola virus and was in critical condition in an isolation ward has died.

The Health Ministry said the Saudi man, who tested negative for dengue fever, died Wednesday morning in a hospital in the western city of Jiddah. The ministry has submitted samples from the man to an international reference lab to test for Ebola.

The 40-year-old man was hospitalized after showing symptoms of a viral hemorrhagic fever following a recent trip to Sierra Leone, one of the West African countries where an outbreak of Ebola has sickened about 1,500 people.

ebola
Click for the latest news and analysis on the epidemic in West Africa.
The World Health Organization said Wednesday that the death toll from the epidemic in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria has reached 932. The West African outbreak is the worst Ebola epidemic ever recorded. There is no known cure or vaccine for the virus, symptoms of which include vomiting, diarrhea and internal and external bleeding.

A Nigerian nurse is the second person to die of the disease in that country, officials reported Wednesday. Five other Nigerians have been confirmed to be infected.

The nurse, who died in Nigeria's largest city of Lagos, had treated a Liberian-American man, Patrick Sawyer, who flew into Lagos last month and later died of Ebola, Nigerian Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said, according to a statement.

The five people with the disease had direct contact with Sawyer. Authorities are now following up with others who had contact with him to see if they are showing Ebola symptoms.

Chukwu said the five confirmed Ebola patients are being treated in isolation in Lagos, also sub-Saharan Africa's largest city with 21 million people. The death of the unidentified nurse is a particularly worrisome development because of Lagos's population size.

Saudi Arabia announced earlier this year that it would not issue pilgrimage visas from West African countries to counter any further spread of the disease.

Different types of viral hemorrhagic fevers have been found in the kingdom, but the ministry says no case of Ebola has ever been detected there.

Meanwhile, Spain's Defense Ministry said a medically-equipped Airbus 310 is ready to fly to Liberia to repatriate a Spanish missionary priest who has also tested positive for the Ebola virus. The ministry said Wednesday preparations for the flight are being finalized but it is not yet known at what time the plane would take off.

The Spanish missionary's evacuation follows the evacuation this week of two infected American health care workers from Liberia for treatment in an isolation unit in Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.

Al Jazeera and wire services

http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2 ... pital.html

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2014 3:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
(CNN) -- Health officials in Nigeria and Saudi Arabia on Wednesday reported deaths of citizens they suspect were infected with Ebola, and Spain said it will accept a patient from the West African outbreak, adding to concerns about the spread of the deadly virus.

Nigeria reported that a nurse died after treating someone believed to have contracted Ebola in Liberia, and Saudi Arabia reported that a man died, apparently of the virus, after a trip to Sierra Leone.

The World Health Organization did not immediately confirm the deaths.

A Spanish priest who contracted the disease in Liberia will be flown to Madrid and become the Europe's first patient from this outbreak, according to the Spanish government.

WHO said Wednesday that 932 deaths had been reported or confirmed as a result of Ebola through Monday. That number -- up from 887 reported just two days ago -- does not include the latest death in Nigeria or the death in Saudi Arabia.

Nearly all of those deaths have been in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea, where more than 1,700 cases have been reported, according to WHO. The agency said 108 new cases were reported between Saturday and Monday in those countries and Nigeria.

The nurse in Nigeria had helped care for a Liberian-American man (Patrick Sawyer) who had died in Nigeria after traveling there from Liberia, Nigeria's Ministry of Health said Wednesday.

Nigeria has confirmed another five cases of Ebola, the Health Ministry said.

The Saudi man died Wednesday at a specialized hospital in Jeddah, the Saudi Ministry of Health said.
He had been in intensive care since late Monday "after exhibiting symptoms of viral hemorrhagic fever following a business trip to Sierra Leone," the ministry said in a statement.

Spain's Ministry of Defense is using a medically equipped Airbus A310 to bring Brother Miguel Pajares to Madrid, where he will be treated at Madrid's La Paz hospital, Spanish officials said.

In the United States, two patients are being treated at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta: American doctor Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, who had been in Liberia. Emory is one of four U.S. institutions capable of providing such treatment.

Is experimental drug helping?
Both Brantly and Writebol have been given the experimental drug ZMapp, which had not been tested on humans nor has it undergone any clinical trials.

Doctors say say it's too early to tell if ZMapp is effective or if the two American patients are improving due to the standard treatment for Ebola.

The Centers for Disease control and prevention says it's not likely the drug will become available for patients in West Africa.

"The product is still in an experimental stage, and the manufacturer reports that there is a very limited supply, so it cannot be purchased and is not available for general use," the CDC said.

The World Health Organization will convene a medical ethics panel early next week to answer questions about whom should receive ZMapp, given that it is in limited supply.

"We have a disease with a high fatality rate without any proven treatment or vaccine," said Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, assistant director-general at WHO.

"We need to ask the medical ethicists to give us guidance on what the responsible thing to do is," she said.

'Most complex Ebola outbreak'
"This is the biggest and most complex Ebola outbreak in history," Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said in a statement.
"It will take many months, and it won't be easy, but Ebola can be stopped," he said. "We know what needs to be done."

The United States is planning to send 50 health experts to West Africa to help contain the outbreak, which President Barack Obama addressed in remarks Wednesday, saying citizens of the affected countries are in Americans' thoughts and prayers.

The United States stands "with the people of Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia," Obama said during the U.S. Africa Leaders Summit in Washington.

Frieden said the 50 experts from the CDC will work to combat the outbreak and help implement stronger systems to fight the disease.

The Ebola virus causes viral hemorrhagic fever, which affects multiple organ systems in the body and is often accompanied by bleeding.

Early symptoms include sudden onset of fever, weakness, muscle pain, headaches and a sore throat. They later progress to vomiting, diarrhea, impaired kidney and liver function -- and sometimes internal and external bleeding.

5 reasons not to panic about Ebola in the U.S.
Ebola spreads through contact with organs and bodily fluids such as blood, saliva, urine and other secretions of infected people. It has no known cure. The most common treatment requires supporting organ functions and maintaining bodily fluids such as blood and water long enough for the body to fight off the infection.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/06/health/af ... ?hpt=hp_t1

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 07, 2014 7:49 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Nigeria Braces for More Ebola Cases Amid Outbreak
Maram Mazen / Lagos 12:31 PM ET

A bustling city tries to avoid becoming the next Ebola hotspot

Medical staff working with Medecins sans Frontieres (MSF) prepare to bring food to patients kept in an isolation area at the MSF Ebola treatment centre in Kailahun, Sierra Leone on July 20, 2014.

Until last week, many Nigerians largely ignored West Africa’s Ebola outbreak: It was several countries away and didn’t seem like an immediate threat. That changed after a Liberian-American named Patrick Sawyer boarded a plane in Liberia while ill with the disease, crossed four countries by air, landed in Lagos, and then collapsed at the airport.

Sawyer died in Lagos days later on July 25, but while being treated he infected at least six other people, including a nurse who died Aug. 5. Suddenly, the government has come under pressure to quickly raise awareness and prepare facilities for more potential cases—all while grappling with a strike by public sector doctors.

The stakes are high. Lagos is Nigeria’s commercial capital and biggest city with 21 million people, in Africa’s most populous country of more than 170 million people. An outbreak in Lagos could bring Africa’s crisis to a whole new level.

Lagos sate health commissioner Jide Idris said this week that doctors didn’t initially realize Sawyer was infected with Ebola, a virus with symptoms similar to other tropical diseases. The government is now screening travelers, obtaining isolation tents in case they receive new cases, and establishing an emergency operations center, while the other five patients with confirmed cases of Ebola are treated in isolation at a Lagos hospital.

But containing the deadly disease takes vigilance. The government’s main focus at the moment is screening incoming and outgoing passengers, treating already ill people in isolation and monitoring people with whom they’ve come in contact. As soon as people who were exposed develop symptoms, they are put in quarantine and tested for Ebola. Health experts say people infected with the virus only become contagious after they develop symptoms, and the virus has an incubation period of up to three weeks.

The government was following a total of 70 people who had primary contact with Sawyer, but the number of people being monitored is growing as the government tracks more people who were in contact with the six infected patients before they showed symptoms.

“It is possible in the first day, probably the second day, in the course of doing this, a lot of those health workers got infected,” Idris told reporters in Lagos. The doctors isolated him “immediately when they realized that ‘Oh this man came from Liberia.’ … That’s when they alerted us.” All of the people infected in Lagos had direct contact with Sawyer.

But more help is needed to contain the disease in Nigeria.

“We need volunteers now, extremely necessary, urgently needed, to assist us in tracking the contacts,” Idris said. “And more importantly to manage those cases that are already in isolation in order to give them a chance for life they need to be properly managed, so we need doctors, we need nurses, environmental health workers.”


Still, the outbreak hasn’t affected daily life in the economic hub of Africa’s largest economy. Even as some concerns mount among government officials, many people say they’re not worried.

“I don’t believe it, I don’t believe what people are saying that is happening in Nigeria,” said 28-year-old Christopher Ukpang, a security guard at an upscale Lagos supermarket. “I’m begging my fellow Nigerians, they should not be afraid of this sickness, it won’t affect us. We should have trust in God.”

Interest spiked after health authorities announced the first confirmed case of Ebola infection of a Nigerian on Aug. 4—and the local media coverage exploded.

“I’m worried about it,” said one Nigerian woman. “In my office they sent out an updated mail to everybody to be very careful and to wash your hand regularly and use the sanitizer.”

Eunice Ojodu, a 50-year-old fruit seller in the city, said she had heard about the disease in awareness messages the government is broadcasting on TV and radio.

“It’s killing people but I haven’t seen it,” she said. “I haven’t seen it and I don’t pray to see it.”
http://time.com/3089072/ebola-outbreak-nigeria-lagos/

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 08, 2014 12:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
Ebola: FG Shuts NNPC Hospital over Suspected Case of Ebola
08 Aug 2014
starconnect
Ebola at NNPC hospital

Lagos has sealed up one of the hospitals belonging to the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) in Ikoyi, Lagos over suspected case of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) .

Minister for Health, Professor Onyebuchi Chukwu who confirmed the incident after a courtesy call on the Lagos State Governor, Mr. Babatunde Fashola said officials of the ministry are still investigating the incident of suspected Ebola patient in the hospital. He said the result carried out on blood samples obtained from the patient will be out by tomorrow but that the place remained shut for decontamination.

We gathered that the Nigerian Nurse who died of Ebola, visited the hospital. The minister however said the hospital will be opened once sanitization is complete in line with world standard and that it will be handled the way First Consultant Hospital was handled.

The minister who visited the governor along with Minister for Information, Mr. Labaran Maku appealed to Nigerians who are not medical staff to desist from wearing hand gloves.

“Don’t wear gloves because it is counterproductive, unless all of us are wearing gloves, if I am wearing and you are not wearing , you only collecting from me and you will take it home from me and your children at home will get it”, he warned.

He said that government has decided to step up operations in the border posts by procuring more thermal hand scanners for the 49 land crossing, eight seaports and eight international airports.

He appealed to Nigerians to cultivate the habit of regular hand washing, adding that where there is no water, Nigerians should use hand sanitizers and where there is no soap, use water and bleach.

He said the Federal Government is working with the state government in line with international organisations adding that the Lagos State government has been able to provide site for treatment.

“We are now treating patients”, he said adding that screening is currently ongoing around the nation’s borders.

He said Nigerians who have corpses with full certification of death of causes of death could apply for waivers which he said will be granted once the corpse is certified to have died of causes other than Ebola.

http://starconnectmedia.com/2014/08/08/ ... -of-ebola/

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 08, 2014 1:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Aug 19, 2009 10:42 am
Posts: 56044
Location: Pittsburgh, PA USA
(Reuters) - Nigeria's state oil company NNPC said on Friday it had shut down its own clinic in Lagos' commercial district of Victoria Island, after a suspected Ebola case was admitted there.

The patient who arrived there sick had previously visited the First Consultant Medical Centre, also now shut, where the country's first case of Ebola was recorded.

"In the meantime, all contacts with this case are being traced and adequate precautionary measures instituted to contain the possible spread of the disease," NNPC spokesman Ohi Alegbe said in an emailed statement.

He described it as a "pre-emptive step". (Reporting by Camillus Eboh; Writing by Tim Cocks; Editing by Andrew Roche)

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/08/0 ... LR20140808

_________________
www.twitter.com/hniman


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 59 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group