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PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2014 11:46 am 
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niman wrote:
niman wrote:
There was panic in Victoria Island today after a suspected Ebola patient was found to be admitted at the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, NNPC clinic on Muri Okunola.

The patient was said to have first been admitted at First Consultant Medical Centre around the same time Liberian Patrick Sawyer was being treated at the clinic. Men suited in white safety clothing and an ambulance were seen at the hospital around one 1pm today.

Though there’s no definite confirmation that the patient is infected with Ebola, the Management of NNPC Clinic this evening announced the indefinite shutdown of the clinic.

The management said its a pre-emptive step and also said they have reported the issue to the Federal Ministry of Health as well as officials of the Lagos State Ministry of Health. More pics after the cut

http://gist.ng/2014/08/nnpc-shuts-clini ... um=twitter

The above patient appears to the pregnant patient infected by the Ebola confirmed nurse who treated Patrick Sawyer.

A medical doctor has revealed how a nursing mother contracted the deadly Ebola virus at a Lagos hospital. It was learnt that the woman was the patient who visited the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation staff clinic on Muri Okunola Street in the Victoria Island area of Lagos.

The doctor, who had a first-hand information of the incident, said the nursing mother had first visited the First Consultant Medical Centre, Obalende.

He said, “The lady attended ante-natal at First Consultant prior to the arrival of the Liberian, Mr. Patrick Sawyer. She was delivered of her baby at the hospital after which she was discharged.

“A few weeks later, Mr. Sawyer came around and was attended to by health workers. He was first treated for malaria, then typhoid, before there was high index of suspicion. He tested positive for Ebola and died.

“Then the woman, who gave birth at the hospital came back to the hospital for her baby’s immunisation. The nurses who attended to Sawyer also attended to her.

“When she visited the place again last week, she discovered the place had been shut down for proper fumigation as a means of control against Ebola.”

He told Punch that the nursing mother decided to visit a neighbouring clinic which was the NNPC clinic. He said it was there she began her treatment after she fell ill.

“She was first treated for Malaria. However, after some medical tests, there was a high suspicion of Ebola haemorrhagic fever. On Friday, the Lagos State’s emergency response team on Ebola virus came around and took her to the Infectious Diseases Hospital,” he added.

The mother and her baby, who were taken away from the hospital on Friday, have been quarantined.
http://www.pakurumo.com/2014/08/heartbr ... racts.html

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 12, 2014 12:43 pm 
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niman wrote:
When Priness Sawyer developed symptoms, including heavy bleeding, she was brought to the hospital by her fiancee, who said she was having a miscarriage. She then received a D&C which did not stop the bleeding. She was treated by Dr Patrick Nshamdze, St. Joseph Catholic Hospital Chief Administrator.

He subsequently developed symptoms, but tested negative. He later tested positive and died August 1, leading to the closure of the hospital.

The latest Ebola victim from the Saint Joseph's Catholic Hospital is Ghanaian priest George Combey, who died of the virus overnight, his Roman Catholic order said in a statement. "We wish to show our support to George Combey's family at this difficult time," said the Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God, which created the Juan Ciudad ONGD international aid group.

The haemorrhagic virus killed the hospital's director, Cameroon-born Patrick Nshamdze, on August 2 and a week later it claimed the life of a nun at the same hospital, Chantal Pascaline, from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

It is not known exactly how the third victim contracted Ebola, said the order's spokeswoman, Adriana Castro. But a test had wrongly shown the first victim, the hospital director, to be free of Ebola before his death, the spokeswoman told AFP.

'DID NOT TAKE PRECAUTIONS'


"What we fear is that as Patrick's test showed negative, many of them relaxed," she added. "They probably did not carry on taking such strict safety measures such as not touching and all that because they were treating him. That may be when he was infected."

The evacuated priest, 75-year-old missionary Miguel Pajares who is in isolation at Madrid's Carlos III hospital for treatment with US experimental drug ZMapp, may have caught Ebola in the same way, she said.

"We don't know 100 percent but it is probable that is how Pajares was infected and possibly from Pajares the virus extended among people who were there," the spokeswoman said in an interview. "Until they knew they were positive with Ebola they did not take precautions," she said.

Ebola causes fever and, in the worst cases, unstoppable bleeding, and can be fatal in 25 to 90 percent of cases, according to the WHO. The virus spreads by close contact with an infected person through bodily fluids such as sweat, blood and tissue.

The latest outbreak - which the WHO says is by far the worst since Ebola was discovered four decades ago - has killed around 55-60 percent of those infected.

NO GLOVES


The Spanish religious order declined to comment on letters purportedly from Pajares describing his fear of Ebola and a lack of basic equipment to protect against its spread.

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/wor ... 07526.html?

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 1:19 pm 
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AT CATHOLIC HOSPITAL, SEVERAL EBOLA DEATHS TRACED TO SAWYER

Written by Wade C. L. Williams, wade.williams@frontpageafricaonline.com
Published: 13 August 2014
Image
Monrovia - When Patrick Sawyer took his sister, Princess who was bleeding profusely to the St. Joseph Catholic hospital, healthcare workers ran to the rescue, but this hospitality led to the trail of death from the deadly Ebola Virus that no one ever imagined could possibly happen, with up to six deaths now in Liberia and two in Nigeria including an ECOWAS Protocol officer.

Shocking news, trails of death, the St. The Joseph Catholic hospital is now a ghost town with the entire staff evacuated and some still counting days at isolation centers hoping for a miracle to recover. Since last week there has been news of deaths emanating from the Hospital. The first was the Hospital’s Chief Administrator Patrick Nshamdze, 52, from Cameroon who died on August 2, 2014 after contracting the deadly Ebola virus then followed more deaths.

Six persons have now died from the hospital, including a Spanish priest who died on Tuesday after being airlifted to Spain for treatment, after contracting the deadly virus disease. Three women's health-workers, including a Congolese nun have died and one medical doctor from the hospital.

But the death trail is even more shocking as all points to one person. On a fateful day in early July, a lady known as Princess, who happened to be the sister of a senior Liberian Finance Ministry official, was brought in to the hospital, escorted by her brother Patrick Sawyer. The woman was bleeding profusely and every other health worker was afraid to touch her as news of the deadly Ebola outbreak had already spread according to sources.

Initial report points to miscarriage

A FrontPageAfrica’s investigation has found that due to the refusal of the health workers to promptly attend to the sick woman the late Nshamdze, who was chief administrator at the hospital decided to help care for the woman. Sources say he attended to the sick woman and convinced other health workers that the case was purely signs of a miscarriage and encouraged the other doctor to carry out a certified abortion procedure.

Sources informed FrontPageAfrica that despite the procedure, the bleeding did not stop and the woman died. Several persons who came in contact with the woman, sister of Sawyer still did not suspect that something was wrong, then exactly 18 days after her death, came the news of her brother’s death. Patrick Sawyer left Liberia to attend an ECOWAS Conference in Nigeria and he also started showing symptoms of the deadly virus and on July 25, he was pronounced dead by Nigerian authorities. In Nigeria, a total of thirteen cases has been reported as a result of the Ebola virus, with two deaths.

Sawyer’s death created tremors in Liberia and people in high places found it difficult to believe. But the situation with how Sawyer left Liberia remains shrouded in controversy. Yet the repercussion of his trip to the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital is still being felt.

Sources say following the Sawyers death health workers at the hospital began to show signs of the deadly virus, but denial again reigned. Sources say when the healthcare workers at the hospital began to notice that Brother Nshamdze was showing signs of the disease, they admonished him to do a test to find out whether he had the virus, since in fact he had come in contact with the Sawyers.

But he was also in denial and because of that, did not show the true outcome of the first test that came out positive. But, how a negative result was pronounced that came back two weeks later as positive is still a puzzle that Liberians are trying to piece together.

Ebola death roll

Sources tell FrontPageAfrica that after the result came back negative, the Catholic brother told his colleagues that all was well and they kept caring for him because they felt he was suffering from a heart disease that was his known medical condition. It was when a second test was done on him that came out positive after he tried to leave the country while critically ill did his colleagues begin to cut off contact with him but it was too late. He died on August 2, 2014 and the death roll continued after that.

A Congolese nun who worked with Spanish Catholic missionaries and also worked with Nshamdze died of Ebola on Saturday and was buried. Chantal Pascaline died early Saturday “due to Ebola at the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia,” the Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God said in a statement. A few days later the Spanish priest Miguel Pajares, 75, who was airlifted back to Spain last week with a nun who tested negative for the virus died on Tuesday.

The St. The Joseph’s Catholic Hospital and the Catholic Church were badly hit by the deadly virus and the hospital was forced to close as five other religious brothers with the virus have been quarantined, including two members of the Order of St. John of God and three Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception. The clock continued to tick and more deaths continue to be reported from the hospital.

Tears for negligence

Someone who works with the Ebola response team posted in frustration on their Facebook page shed more light on the situation at the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital.

“I stood with my tracers and watched the ambulance team transferring two of the Catholic Sisters from their St. Joseph Catholic Hospital Compound. As the two innocent young Nuns from the Democratic Republic of Congo mounted the ambulance to be taken to the treatment unit at the ELWA, I shed tears. I shed tears because we could have prevented them from contracting this deadly disease,” stated the person only identified as Mosoka.

“They had trusted us and our ability to manage the Ebola response; we cause all of them to be infected. After serving this country for over 40 years and saving thousands of lives, is this the way we could repay them. As the ambulance made its way out of the deserted hospital with the first badge of two nuns, I became too overwhelmed with sorrow. The ambulance was returning for four of them, including a medical doctor. How could we have disappointed them.”

Mosoka’s account states that three weeks ago, the hospital’s administrator who died was a contract until he started showing symptoms and the laboratory had taken his specimen and his result was negative.

“Based on this result, the other sisters and brothers decided to nurse him back to health. Despite their treatment, he progressively began to show signs and symptoms that were typical of Ebola. He decided that he would leave for his home country, but the airline recognizing the signs, symptoms and ask for a repeat of the test. Behold! This came back positive,” states Mosoka.

The sisters, brothers and doctors who treated him were in a state of shock and dismay. Brother Patrick was kept in one room of the hospital for treatment. The confidence of the brothers and sister in our Ebola response system was seriously corroded. Brother Patrick became weaker and weaker and others stopped coming around as they pondered over their own status. Then Brother Patrick died. His body was among the 52 bodies that were buried in a mass grave one-weekend ago. Then the sisters and brothers as well three of the Liberian health care workers (including a laboratory technician, a social worker and a nurse) started getting sick. In all seven of them became positive for Ebola.”

Ordered for New Results

The statement notes that one of them, a Nigerian Medical doctor, was told he was negative, however, he contended that every symptom in his body indicated to him that he too had contracted the disease. “We then ordered for a new result. We are awaiting this result, but he is getting sicker and sicker each day,” states Mosoka.

Through one pair of siblings, a disease that has no cure has spread beyond borders and has claimed the lives of Liberians, Spaniards, Cameroonians, Nigerians, Ugandan and a Congolese. The Ebola trail of death from the Sawyer’s has extended to Nigeria with two deaths now reported, including an ECOWAS protocol officer who received and helped convey Sawyer to hospital in Lagos passed away of the Ebola, according to an ECOWAS official.

U.S. Responds

The global trend the disease is taking has led governments like that United States to be on high alert. A U.S. State Department release early Tuesday evening stated the US is working with the World Health Organization and other international partners to help West African governments respond to and contain the outbreak of the Ebola virus as quickly as possible.

“The full range of relevant U.S. Government agencies — including the Department of State, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), and the Department of Defense (DOD) — are increasing every possible form of assistance to the affected countries, their citizens and international organizations responding to the outbreak,” states the release.

The State Department stated that U.S. assistance includes equipment and other essential supplies, public health messaging efforts, and technical and medical expertise. It states that the U.S. Department of State issued a Travel Warning on August 7, 2014 against non-essential travel to Liberia and that due to a lack of options for routine health care services, the Department of State ordered the departure of family members residing with Embassy staff in Monrovia to begin August 8, 2014.

But the State Department clarified that U.S. Government employees in Liberia will remain on active duty at the Embassy and additional staff members are being deployed to assist the Government of Liberia in addressing the Ebola Virus Disease outbreak.

“At this time, no Ebola-related travel restrictions have been issued by the State Department for Guinea, Nigeria, or Sierra Leone. However, CDC has issued alerts for the four countries. More information can be found at: Guinea (Warning - Level 3), Liberia (Warning - Level 3), Sierra Leone (Warning - Level 3), Nigeria (Alert - Level 2).”

U.S. Still Deeply Committed

It states that its Embassies remain open and will continue business as usual in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. “We remain deeply committed to supporting regional and international efforts to deliver health care as well as contain and control the transmission of the Ebola virus,” states the release.

The U.S. Government is monitoring the situation very closely and will update its response and travel recommendations as needed. The U.S. Government has a range of steps in place to prevent the introduction, transmission and spread of suspected communicable diseases across the U.S. border. We're working closely across federal agencies and with African partners to make sure appropriate procedures are in place for screening both in the region and here in the United States.”

The U.S. says, as the Center for Disease Control has stated repeatedly, there is no significant risk to the United States from Ebola. The WHO states that new cases and deaths attributable to EVD continue to be reported by the Ministries of Health in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. The WHO states that between 7 and 9 August 2014, 69 new cases (laboratory-confirmed, probable, and suspect cases) of EVD and 52 deaths were reported from the four countries as follows: Guinea, 11 new cases and 6 deaths; Liberia, 45 new cases and 29 deaths; Nigeria, 0 new cases and 0 deaths; and Sierra Leone, 13 new cases and 17 deaths. In Nigeria, WHO and the Nigerian Ministry of Health reported 13 suspect cases, including 2 fatal cases, as of August 9, 2014.

http://frontpageafricaonline.com/index. ... -to-sawyer

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 2:51 pm 
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How Bureaucrats Let Ebola Spread to Nigeria
After Patrick Sawyer’s sister died of the virus, Liberia’s Ministry of Health instructed him not to travel. But he was allowed to fly to Lagos. Now he’s dead—and 10 more are infected.
From the hot zone come more chilling reports about the U.S. citizen who brought Ebola from his native Liberia to Nigeria and might well have brought it to America if he had been able to return to his wife and children in Minnesota this month as he planned.

We now learn that 42-year-old Patrick Sawyer was traveling to an economic conference as a representative of the Liberian Ministry of Finance even though the Liberian Ministry of Heath had instructed him not to travel because he might be infected with Ebola.

“I can confirm to you that he was advised by the Chief Medical Officer at the Ministry of Health not to leave the country because he was under observation,” a Liberian government spokesman was quoted telling a Lagos newspaper. “It was regrettable that he left the country while being observed.”

Ministry of Health protocols called for Sawyer to be to be monitored daily for 21 days. But as an official with the Ministry of Finance, Sawyer went ahead with plans to attend an economic development conference in Nigeria. The man who authorized the trip, then-Deputy Minister for the Budget Sebastian Muah, at first said he had authorized the trip and excused the decision by pleading a lack of medical expertise.

“I am a medical doctor?” he asked in an online posting. “Take me to the international court since I am guilty of approving a travel.”

On Wednesday, Muah suddenly denied all responsibility, telling the Liberian website FrontPageAfrica that Sawyer never got government approval for the trip and secured his ticket through the organization that sponsored the conference.

What is beyond dispute is that a man who was officially under observation as a possible Ebola carrier was permitted to board a plane for Lagos on July 20 even though he was manifestly ill. He is said to have been in such physical distress that surveillance camera footage shows him at one point sprawling facedown in the airport waiting area.

The footage, which has not been released but has been viewed by a reporter for The New Dawn, also reportedly shows a downcast and sick-looking Sawyer seeming to avoid physical contact with others, at one point declining to shake the outstretched hand of an immigration official—a suggestion that he harbored at least a suspicion that he might be carrying an infectious disease.

Sawyer vomited repeatedly during the two-stop flight and collapsed upon arriving at the Lagos airport. He was taken to First Consultant Hospital, where he reportedly told the medical staff that he had malaria.

He tested positive for Ebola and is said to have been in such deep and desperate denial that he insisted the doctors were wrong. He is described by FrontPageAfrica as having become so angry he ripped the IV lines from his arms. He also apparently sought the help of high-ranking Liberian officials, who reportedly pressured the hospital to release him, initially so he could attend the conference, then simply so he could go home.

On July 25, five days after he landed in Lagos, Sawyer died. At least 10 Nigerians were infected as a result of his apparently officially sanctioned travel, including a nursing mother who had given birth at the hospital before he arrived but returned afterward for her newborn’s vaccinations. She apparently was infected by a nurse who had become infected while treating Sawyer.

Another nurse who was working when Sawyer was brought to the hospital from the airport went on Facebook and reasoned that she had not been exposed enough to have caught the dread disease:

“I never contacted his fluids. I checked his vitals, helped him with his food (he was too weak),” wrote the nurse, Obi Justina Ejelonu. “I basically touched where his hands touched and that’s the only contact. Not directly with his fluids. At a stage, he yanked off his infusion and we had blood everywhere on his bed…But the ward maids took care of that and changed his linens with great precaution.”

Ejelonu soon after tested positive and at last report was critically ill, deep in the horrors of Ebola. The chain of infection goes back to Sawyer’s 27-year-old sister, Princess Nyuennyue, who was bleeding heavily from her vagina when her husband brought her to St. Joseph’s Catholic Hospital in Monrovia in early July.

“It’s possible the health ministry was monitoring him, but the finance ministry did not know.”
The medical staff were at first leery of treating her for fear of Ebola. The hospital’s chief administrator, Brother Patrick Nshamdze of the Hospitaller Order of Saint John of God, stepped in. He was from Cameroon and spoke French, as did the woman’s husband, who reportedly told him that she was suffering a miscarriage.

Nshamdze arranged for Sawyer’s sister to undergo a D&C and be admitted to a general ward. But she continued to bleed, and the staff became all the more alarmed. She was scheduled to be transferred to the isolation unit when her brother arrived.

Sawyer insisted that she be given a private room and plunked down $500 to secure it. He proceeded to personally change her gown and placed her in a wheelchair for the move. He was seen to get her blood on his own clothes as well as his shoes in the process. He is said to have been given a pair of slippers to wear.

On July 7, the sister died. Sawyer’s bloody shoes were still in the private room and were left there along with her belongings by hospital staff, who were fearful of the virus.

On July 9, Sawyer informed ArcelorMittal, a mining company where he worked as a part-time consultant, that his sister had died of Ebola. The company says it immediately notified the government.

“Having informed us of this news, Patrick was submitted to the Ministry of Health for a medical observation and isolation and requested not to return to work until he had passed through the incubation period,” a company newsletter reports.


The Ministry of Heath is said to have ordered Sawyer not to travel. The Ministry of Finance nonetheless apparently authorized him to attend the conference in Nigeria. Finance officials there might have been worried about the repercussions among the other participants if it became known that a prominent Liberian had canceled because he might be infected with Ebola. Or the officials might not have been aware of the medical cause for concern.

“It’s possible the health ministry was monitoring him, but the finance ministry did not know,” a Liberian government spokesman later said.

Sawyer’s widow has since suggested in a Facebook post that his real reason for going to Nigeria was to seek better health care than was available in Liberia. Decontee Sawyer wrote: “He has expressed to me many times in the past that he felt passionately about helping to be a part of strengthening Liberia’s healthcare system, but he knew it wasn’t there yet, and he wouldn’t want to take a chance with his life because a lot of people depended on him.”

She went on, “Patrick had a passion for life, and he wouldn’t have wanted his to end. So, I bet anything he was thinking, ‘If I could only get to Nigeria, a way more developed country than Liberia, I would be able to get some help.’”

Unfortunately, none of his reported behavior following his arrival in Nigeria supports those contentions. He seemed, if anything, to resist the efforts to help him. And if he really accepted his life might be at stake and truly was seeking superior medical care, he could have returned to his family in the United States a month early. The truth is likely closer to what the widow told The Daily Beast in late July.

“I think he might have been in a state of denial,” she said.

In the meantime, at St. Joseph’s Catholic Hospital in Liberia, Brother Patrick Nshamdze, the administrator who had assisted Sawyer’s sister, fell ill. A first test for Ebola was negative.

“Based on this result, the other sisters and brothers decided to nurse him back to health,” an Ebola control worker who is identified only as Mosoka wrote in a letter that was posted on Facebook. “Despite their treatment he progressively began to show signs and symptoms that were typical of Ebola. He decided that he would leave for his home country, but the airline recognizing the signs and symptoms ask for a repeat of the test. Behold! This came back positive.”

The other health-care workers were stunned. And terrified.

“Brother Patrick was kept in one room of the hospital for treatment,” the letter continues. “The confidence of the brothers and sisters in our Ebola response system was seriously corroded. Brother Patrick became weaker and weaker and others stop coming around as they pondered over their own status. Then Brother Patrick died. His body was among the 52 bodies that were buried in a mass grave.”

That was on August 7. Seven other staff members then fell ill.

“One of them, a Nigerian Medical doctor, was told he was negative,” the letter reports. “However, he told us that every symptom in his body indicated to him that he too had contacted the disease. We then ordered for a new result. We are awaiting this result, but he is getting sicker and sicker each day.”

Others who had become infected included a technician from the lab that had been returning mistaken results.

“I have investigated the laboratory procedure and I noted several sources for potential errors,” the letter by Mosoka reports. “There is a single team of laboratory technicians that are working over ten hours a day and seven days a week without any time to rest. This would lead to lapses and increased risk for errors. One of the technicians told me sadly that they worked these very long hours and no one provides them with food. They begged for food and were given a 100-pound bag of rice with no soup kind and no one to cook for them. Many of them had not being paid for three months. How could we trust our lives in the hands of people that are overworked, starved and not given their just compensation? Are we winning this war against Ebola?”

The infected staff also included a social worker who now fled rather than be transferred to an Ebola treatment center, the very same one where Americans Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol were working when they fell ill.

“Her daughter came and took her away, when she heard we were moving them to the treatment unit,” the letter reports. “This is worrisome as she could be a source of new transmissions in the community. Are we really winning this war against Ebola? I would say NO!!!”

Also among the ill was a 75-year-old Spanish priest, Father Miguel Pajares. He was evacuated to a hospital in Spain and given a dose of the experimental serum ZMapp that had been administered to the two American health-care workers. The Americans seem to be on the mend in Atlanta, but the priest died on Tuesday.

Back in Liberia, Mosoka was summoned when an emergency arose at an outpatient clinic.

“A man had started vomiting and toileting blood,” the letter reports. “I was called to intervene. I call the ambulance team but no one responded. I called those of my colleagues in authority at the Health Ministry, but they too were powerless as the system and the logistics were not in place to respond to such a call. The treatment unit was overflowing with sick people. They just could not pick any one up in the community because there were no beds available in the unit. Then the man died. His body stayed in the house for two days, while his poor wife and children slept in the open. No one wants to come closer to them. After two whole days of begging every authority I knew, they finally removed the body today.”

But the house had not been disinfected.

“The home was never spread. The poor woman and her children are again sleeping outside today. I have tried to call the guy on spraying but his phone is off. But, I will press on and will call again tomorrow.”

As the Ebola treatment center overflowed, St. Joseph’s Hospital, the oldest in Liberia, was shut down, it too waiting to be disinfected.

“The hospital is a ghost town,” Mosoka writes.

The letter closes with noble words of faith and hope from the hot zone where screw-ups are met each day with selfless courage.

“Maybe, as some of us fight each day to make some kind of difference, it will at least amend for all of our mistakes and failures in the Ebola Response. May God save our country and those countries affected!!!!”

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... geria.html

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 3:08 pm 
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Liberia: At Catholic Hospital, Several Ebola Deaths Traced to Sawyer

Monrovia — When Patrick Sawyer took his sister, Princess who was bleeding profusely to the St. Joseph Catholic hospital, healthcare workers ran to the rescue, but this hospitality led to the trail of death from the deadly Ebola Virus that no one ever imagined could possibly happen, with up to six deaths now in Liberia and two in Nigeria including an ECOWAS Protocol officer.

Shocking news, trails of death, the St. The Joseph Catholic hospital is now a ghost town with the entire staff evacuated and some still counting days at isolation centers hoping for a miracle to recover. Since last week there has been news of deaths emanating from the Hospital. The first was the Hospital's Chief Administrator Patrick Nshamdze, 52, from Cameroon who died on August 2, 2014 after contracting the deadly Ebola virus then followed more deaths.

Six persons have now died from the hospital, including a Spanish priest who died on Tuesday after being airlifted to Spain for treatment, after contracting the deadly virus disease. Three women's health-workers, including a Congolese nun have died and one medical doctor from the hospital.

But the death trail is even more shocking as all points to one person. On a fateful day in early July, a lady known as Princess, who happened to be the sister of a senior Liberian Finance Ministry official, was brought in to the hospital, escorted by her brother Patrick Sawyer. The woman was bleeding profusely and every other health worker was afraid to touch her as news of the deadly Ebola outbreak had already spread according to sources.

Initial report points to miscarriage

A FrontPageAfrica's investigation has found that due to the refusal of the health workers to promptly attend to the sick woman the late Nshamdze, who was chief administrator at the hospital decided to help care for the woman. Sources say he attended to the sick woman and convinced other health workers that the case was purely signs of a miscarriage and encouraged the other doctor to carry out a certified abortion procedure.

Sources informed FrontPageAfrica that despite the procedure, the bleeding did not stop and the woman died. Several persons who came in contact with the woman, sister of Sawyer still did not suspect that something was wrong, then exactly 18 days after her death, came the news of her brother's death. Patrick Sawyer left Liberia to attend an ECOWAS Conference in Nigeria and he also started showing symptoms of the deadly virus and on August 25, he was pronounced dead by Nigerian authorities. In Nigeria, a total of thirteen cases has been reported as a result of the Ebola virus, with two deaths.

Sawyer's death created tremors in Liberia and people in high places found it difficult to believe. But the situation with how Sawyer left Liberia remains shrouded in controversy. Yet the repercussion of his trip to the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital is still being felt.

Sources say following the Sawyers death health workers at the hospital began to show signs of the deadly virus, but denial again reigned. Sources say when the healthcare workers at the hospital began to notice that Brother Nshamdze was showing signs of the disease, they admonished him to do a test to find out whether he had the virus, since in fact he had come in contact with the Sawyers.

But he was also in denial and because of that, did not show the true outcome of the first test that came out positive. But, how a negative result was pronounced that came back two weeks later as positive is still a puzzle that Liberians are trying to piece together.

Ebola death roll

Sources tell FrontPageAfrica that after the result came back negative, the Catholic brother told his colleagues that all was well and they kept caring for him because they felt he was suffering from a heart disease that was his known medical condition. It was when a second test was done on him that came out positive after he tried to leave the country while critically ill did his colleagues begin to cut off contact with him but it was too late. He died on August 2, 2014 and the death roll continued after that.

A Congolese nun who worked with Spanish Catholic missionaries and also worked with Nshamdze died of Ebola on Saturday and was buried. Chantal Pascaline died early Saturday "due to Ebola at the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital in Monrovia," the Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God said in a statement. A few days later the Spanish priest Miguel Pajares, 75, who was airlifted back to Spain last week with a nun who tested negative for the virus died on Tuesday.

The St. The Joseph's Catholic Hospital and the Catholic Church were badly hit by the deadly virus and the hospital was forced to close as five other religious brothers with the virus have been quarantined, including two members of the Order of St. John of God and three Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Conception. The clock continued to tick and more deaths continue to be reported from the hospital.

Tears for negligence

Someone who works with the Ebola response team posted in frustration on their Facebook page shed more light on the situation at the St. Joseph Catholic Hospital.

"I stood with my tracers and watched the ambulance team transferring two of the Catholic Sisters from their St. Joseph Catholic Hospital Compound. As the two innocent young Nuns from the Democratic Republic of Congo mounted the ambulance to be taken to the treatment unit at the ELWA, I shed tears. I shed tears because we could have prevented them from contracting this deadly disease," stated the person only identified as Mosoka.



"They had trusted us and our ability to manage the Ebola response; we cause all of them to be infected. After serving this country for over 40 years and saving thousands of lives, is this the way we could repay them. As the ambulance made its way out of the deserted hospital with the first badge of two nuns, I became too overwhelmed with sorrow. The ambulance was returning for four of them, including a medical doctor. How could we have disappointed them."

Mosoka's account states that three weeks ago, the hospital's administrator who died was a contract until he started showing symptoms and the laboratory had taken his specimen and his result was negative.

"Based on this result, the other sisters and brothers decided to nurse him back to health. Despite their treatment, he progressively began to show signs and symptoms that were typical of Ebola. He decided that he would leave for his home country, but the airline recognizing the signs, symptoms and ask for a repeat of the test. Behold! This came back positive," states Mosoka.

The sisters, brothers and doctors who treated him were in a state of shock and dismay. Brother Patrick was kept in one room of the hospital for treatment. The confidence of the brothers and sister in our Ebola response system was seriously corroded. Brother Patrick became weaker and weaker and others stopped coming around as they pondered over their own status. Then Brother Patrick died. His body was among the 52 bodies that were buried in a mass grave one-weekend ago. Then the sisters and brothers as well three of the Liberian health care workers (including a laboratory technician, a social worker and a nurse) started getting sick. In all seven of them became positive for Ebola."

Ordered for New Results

The statement notes that one of them, a Nigerian Medical doctor, was told he was negative, however, he contended that every symptom in his body indicated to him that he too had contracted the disease. "We then ordered for a new result. We are awaiting this result, but he is getting sicker and sicker each day," states Mosoka.

Through one pair of siblings, a disease that has no cure has spread beyond borders and has claimed the lives of Liberians, Spaniards, Cameroonians, Nigerians, Ugandan and a Congolese. The Ebola trail of death from the Sawyer's has extended to Nigeria with two deaths now reported, including an ECOWAS protocol officer who received and helped convey Sawyer to hospital in Lagos passed away of the Ebola, according to an ECOWAS official.

U.S. Responds

The global trend the disease is taking has led governments like that United States to be on high alert. A U.S. State Department release early Tuesday evening stated the US is working with the World Health Organization and other international partners to help West African governments respond to and contain the outbreak of the Ebola virus as quickly as possible.

"The full range of relevant U.S. Government agencies -- including the Department of State, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), and the Department of Defense (DOD) -- are increasing every possible form of assistance to the affected countries, their citizens and international organizations responding to the outbreak," states the release.

The State Department stated that U.S. assistance includes equipment and other essential supplies, public health messaging efforts, and technical and medical expertise. It states that the U.S. Department of State issued a Travel Warning on August 7, 2014 against non-essential travel to Liberia and that due to a lack of options for routine health care services, the Department of State ordered the departure of family members residing with Embassy staff in Monrovia to begin August 8, 2014.

But the State Department clarified that U.S. Government employees in Liberia will remain on active duty at the Embassy and additional staff members are being deployed to assist the Government of Liberia in addressing the Ebola Virus Disease outbreak.

"At this time, no Ebola-related travel restrictions have been issued by the State Department for Guinea, Nigeria, or Sierra Leone. However, CDC has issued alerts for the four countries. More information can be found at: Guinea (Warning - Level 3), Liberia (Warning - Level 3), Sierra Leone (Warning - Level 3), Nigeria (Alert - Level 2)."

U.S. Still Deeply Committed

It states that its Embassies remain open and will continue business as usual in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. "We remain deeply committed to supporting regional and international efforts to deliver health care as well as contain and control the transmission of the Ebola virus," states the release.

The U.S. Government is monitoring the situation very closely and will update its response and travel recommendations as needed. The U.S. Government has a range of steps in place to prevent the introduction, transmission and spread of suspected communicable diseases across the U.S. border. We're working closely across federal agencies and with African partners to make sure appropriate procedures are in place for screening both in the region and here in the United States."

The U.S. says, as the Center for Disease Control has stated repeatedly, there is no significant risk to the United States from Ebola. The WHO states that new cases and deaths attributable to EVD continue to be reported by the Ministries of Health in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone. The WHO states that between 7 and 9 August 2014, 69 new cases (laboratory-confirmed, probable, and suspect cases) of EVD and 52 deaths were reported from the four countries as follows: Guinea, 11 new cases and 6 deaths; Liberia, 45 new cases and 29 deaths; Nigeria, 0 new cases and 0 deaths; and Sierra Leone, 13 new cases and 17 deaths. In Nigeria, WHO and the Nigerian Ministry of Health reported 13 suspect cases, including 2 fatal cases, as of August 9, 2014.

http://allafrica.com/stories/2014081308 ... ?viewall=1

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 3:14 pm 
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http://www.thisdaylive.com/articles/ebo ... cy/186242/
Quote:
Ebola: Patrick Sawyer's a Terrorist, Deserves to Rot in Hell, Says Presidency
13 Aug 2014
By Senator Iroegbu

As the authorities continue to fashion out modalities on how to deal with the outbreak of the deadly Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in the country, the Presidency has tagged the Liberian, Mr Patrick Sawyer, credited with the importation of the virus into Nigeria "a terrorist"; re-echoeing the feeling of many Nigerians who have not forgiven him for knowingly introducing the killer disease.

The Senior Special Assistant to President Goodluck Jonathan on Youths and Students, Mr Jude Imagwe made this assertion Tuesday night in Abuja during the 3rd Nigerian Youth Democracy Dinner to mark the international Day of the Youth with the theme: "Youth and Mental Health".

Imagwe who could not hide his anger at the development, said that Sawyer's misguided action has brought pains and hardship upon Nigerians who have been going about their daily duties.

Not able to come to terms with the motive behind the late Liberian-American's action for knowingly bringing the dreaded Ebola to torment Nigerians, the Presidential aid said "such a man deserves to rot in hell".

He said: "Patrick Sawyer has brought pain and hardship to Nigerians. So many things have now changed because he brought this upon us. Even in churches, we are not free to shake hands or greet anymore”.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:43 am 
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Four people have now died in Nigeria since Liberian-American Patrick Sawyer brought the virus to the country Another nurse who attended to Patrick Sawyer, the Liberian national who died of Ebola Virus Disease, at the First Consultant Hospital has died, PREMIUM has learnt.

The nurse, who had been at the B Ward – a male ward which is now referred to as Ebola Ward – of the Yaba Mainland General Hospital, died in the early hours of Thursday.

By 1 p.m., Thursday, a couple of family relatives who are at the hospital were seen wiping away tears and making telephone calls. Jide Idris, the state Commissioner for Health, who was at the hospital declined to confirm the development to PREMIUM TIMES.

The death of the nurse brings to four the number of people who have died of the virus in Nigeria.

News of the passing of the nurse came as the Minister of Health, Onyebuchi Chukwu, a professor, disclosed at a news conference in Abuja that another of the doctors who treated the late Patrick Sawyer has tested positive to the deadly virus. Details later…. -

See more at: https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/166 ... EazhA.dpuf

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 15, 2014 11:48 am 
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A Spanish charity announced on Monday (Aug 11) a third member of staff at its hospital in Liberia has died of Ebola, saying it fears a lack of basic safety precautions let the virus spread through its team.

MADRID: A Spanish charity announced on Monday (Aug 11) a third member of staff at its hospital in Liberia has died of Ebola, saying it fears a lack of basic safety precautions let the virus spread through its team.

The charity's Ebola-struck hospital in the capital Monrovia has been shuttered, three of its personnel have now died and another, an elderly Spanish priest with Ebola, has been evacuated to Madrid for treatment.

The latest Ebola victim from the Saint Joseph's Catholic Hospital is Ghanaian priest George Combey, who died of the virus overnight, his Roman Catholic order said in a statement. "We wish to show our support to George Combey's family at this difficult time," said the Hospitaller Brothers of St. John of God, which created the Juan Ciudad ONGD international aid group.

The haemorrhagic virus killed the hospital's director, Cameroon-born Patrick Nshamdze, on August 2 and a week later it claimed the life of a nun at the same hospital, Chantal Pascaline, from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

It is not known exactly how the third victim contracted Ebola, said the order's spokeswoman, Adriana Castro. But a test had wrongly shown the first victim, the hospital director, to be free of Ebola before his death, the spokeswoman told AFP.

'DID NOT TAKE PRECAUTIONS'


"What we fear is that as Patrick's test showed negative, many of them relaxed," she added. "They probably did not carry on taking such strict safety measures such as not touching and all that because they were treating him. That may be when he was infected."

The evacuated priest, 75-year-old missionary Miguel Pajares who is in isolation at Madrid's Carlos III hospital for treatment with US experimental drug ZMapp, may have caught Ebola in the same way, she said.

"We don't know 100 percent but it is probable that is how Pajares was infected and possibly from Pajares the virus extended among people who were there," the spokeswoman said in an interview. "Until they knew they were positive with Ebola they did not take precautions," she said.

Ebola causes fever and, in the worst cases, unstoppable bleeding, and can be fatal in 25 to 90 percent of cases, according to the WHO. The virus spreads by close contact with an infected person through bodily fluids such as sweat, blood and tissue.

The latest outbreak - which the WHO says is by far the worst since Ebola was discovered four decades ago - has killed around 55-60 percent of those infected.

NO GLOVES


The Spanish religious order declined to comment on letters purportedly from Pajares describing his fear of Ebola and a lack of basic equipment to protect against its spread.

"Today, July 9 we had the first death from Ebola in our hospital. Many of us who work here, including me, were in contact with the deceased even though we did not have gloves to protect ourselves," the missionary was quoted as saying in one of several letters to friends and family quoted in Spanish daily El Mundo at the weekend. "It is painful but we have to be here. I compare it to war. But it is more dangerous. The enemy at home," said another letter.

The WHO issued advice in April to health care workers treating Ebola patients stressing that it is not always possible to identify infected patients. When within a metre of Ebola patients, healthcare workers should wear a face shield or a medical mask and goggles, a clean, non-sterile long-sleeved gown, and gloves, it said.

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/wor ... 07526.html?

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2014 5:39 pm 
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HCW Ebola case confirmed in Madrid

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2014 5:44 pm 
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It was this on my mind when I brought up Dessie Quinn a few days ago. Okay so Quinn had malaria. Now can we NOT rule out false negatives going around?


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