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PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2014 2:59 pm 
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Nigeria is reporting two more lab confirmed Ebola cases raising the total 9, which is still below the total of 13 reported by WHO in their August 8 report (which was through August 6)

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2014_08_08_ebola/en/

The WHO report includes suspect cases, which were 6 as of August 6. The 7 probably cases in the WHO report corresponds to the prior numbrer of lab confirmed cases in Nigeria.

WHO has still not reported a confirmed cases, in part because of transportation issues in getting samples to the WHO lab in Senegal.

Patrick Sawyer has been PCR confirmed in two labs in Nigeria (one showing a filovirus and the other showing the Zaire clade of Ebola virus, which is a filovirus.

In addition, the lab reporting a filovirus has released a partial sequence which exactly matches the sequences from Guinea and Sierra Leonne, showing that all 2014 sequences are from a single introduction linked to the index case (2M) who died on December 6, 2013.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2014 2:59 pm 
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The Minister of Health, Prof. Onyebuchi Chukwu, on Sunday said two fresh Ebola cases have been uncovered in Lagos.
Chukwu, who was in Lagos in continuation of the regular media briefing on the outbreak of the Ebola virus in Nigeria, said 139 persons are under observation for traces of the disease.
Among the 139 persons, the minister said, are 48 passengers, who were on the Asky Airlines flight that brought in late Liberian-America, Patrick Sawyer, into Nigeria from Liberia.
He described the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa as a “global emergency”.
With the discovery of the two fresh full blown cases of Ebola, nine persons are now known to have come down with the disease in Nigeria.

http://theeagleonline.com.ng/two-fresh- ... -in-lagos/

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 10, 2014 3:04 pm 
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Nigeria Struggles to Cope With Ebola Outbreak
By SABRINA TAVERNISEAUG. 10, 2014

Ebola, one of the world’s most fatal diseases, has surfaced in Africa’s most populous country.

Nigerian health officials have announced nine confirmed cases and two deaths in the country from the Ebola outbreak that is sweeping West Africa, including a nurse and a man from Liberia whom the nurse had been caring for.

The man, Patrick Sawyer, a naturalized American citizen, had flown to Nigeria in late July and died soon after. He had infected at least seven other people, including the nurse, who died on Tuesday, officials said.

By Friday, President Goodluck Jonathan had declared a state of emergency, officially adding Nigeria, home to more than 160 million people, to the list of nations struggling to control one of the largest public-health emergencies in recent history. More than 900 people have died.

The story of Mr. Sawyer, who was reportedly aware that he was sick when he left Liberia, demonstrates just how difficult containing the disease will be in the modern age of rapid travel and growing urbanization. Nigeria has Africa’s largest economy and is deeply connected to the outside world, a fact that could magnify the consequences if the outbreak is not contained.

“Rapid epidemic transmission has been with us a long time, but my guess is that it’s accelerating, with the number of people on the move and intensity of air travel, global trade and the numbers of displaced people we have globally,” said Jeffrey D. Sachs, an economist and the director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University.

Climate change, population growth and an increase in displaced populations mean that people are pushing into previously uninhabited places, creating new vulnerabilities and bringing humans into closer contact with animal populations, where many of the diseases have begun, he said.

At the same time, globalization means that people are mixing more, trading more and handling more farm animals in industrial settings — all of which facilitate the emergence and spread of infectious diseases.

“This ought to force a reflection,” Mr. Sachs said, adding that establishing a basic network of community health workers across the developing world was an urgent priority.

Health officials emphasized that Nigeria still had only a few Ebola cases — nine as of Friday, with two deaths — and that its government had mobilized substantial forces to try to stop the spread of the disease.

David Daigle, a spokesman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s effort in Nigeria, said the ministers of health and information were on hand Friday for the opening of an emergency operation center in Lagos, a sign that the government was treating the situation seriously.

“The Nigerians understand the magnitude of the problem here,” said Dr. Frank Mahoney, an epidemiologist who has been leading the C.D.C.'s Ebola response in Lagos. Still, he said, international health officials are undertaking a substantial effort in Nigeria, motivated by what might happen if the disease, which had been confined to remote forests and villages in decades past, starts to spread in one of Africa’s most densely populated countries.

Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story
“We are very worried about this,” Dr. Mahoney said, pointing out that Nigeria’s health care system could easily become overwhelmed. “Lagos is such a huge city with such a mobile population.”

Lagos, a city of nearly 20 million, the most populous in Nigeria, is also home to a large contingent of religious healers, such as Temitope Balogun Joshua, a popular Christian minister and televangelist known as T. B. Joshua. Health experts are concerned that sick people will flock to Lagos to seek his advice.

Dr. Mahoney said health experts were reaching out to such leaders, and Mr. Jonathan called on churches and religious leaders to halt large gatherings that could encourage the spread of the disease.

Almost all of the suspected Ebola cases involve people who had direct contact with Mr. Sawyer — either in the airport, where he was helped into a car, or in the hospital where he was treated, the First Consultant Medical Center.

Newspapers in Liberia and Nigeria were brimming with accounts of the strange tale of Mr. Sawyer’s sickness, which began in Liberia, where the disease is exploding.

According to a report in The National Chronicle, a Liberian newspaper, Mr. Sawyer’s sister, who died of Ebola in early July, had arrived at a hospital bleeding. But when doctors and nurses tried to put her in isolation, the report said, Mr. Sawyer refused to allow it, demanding that she be given a private ward. He undressed her, put her into a wheelchair and offered the hospital workers cash, the paper said.

And in an account in another Liberian newspaper, The New Dawn, which cited footage from a security camera in the airport in Monrovia, Mr. Sawyer behaved strangely as he waited for his flight out of Liberia. He sat alone, avoiding physical contact with people, including an immigration agent who tried to shake his hand, and even lay flat on his stomach on the floor of a corridor of the airport, the paper reported.

The episode prompted the president of Liberia, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, to publicly apologize to Nigeria about Mr. Sawyer, who she said had sneaked out of Liberia, where he was being tracked as a potential Ebola case, according to The Daily Independent, a Nigerian newspaper.

The number of suspected cases has continued to tick up slowly. Nigeria’s state oil company announced on Friday that it had closed its clinic in Lagos after a patient suspected of having Ebola was admitted there. The patient had visited the First Consultant Medical Center, which has since been closed.

In a strange twist, a doctors’ strike in Nigeria may have saved lives by reducing the number of medical workers who came into contact with Mr. Sawyer.

“It would have been a disaster,” said Babajide Saheed, a doctor and the secretary of the Lagos State chapter of the Nigerian Medical Association. “At the time, nobody was prepared for it.”

About 70 people are believed to have had contact with Mr. Sawyer, Nigerian health officials said. Dr. Mahoney said teams of people were working to call those people and to try to persuade them to stay at home and watch for symptoms, such as a rising temperature.

Just as concerning was what would happen if the disease began to spread inside the health care system, Dr. Mahoney said.

“The health care system in Nigeria would have a really difficult time responding to a communitywide outbreak,” he said.

Correction: August 10, 2014
An earlier version of this article reversed the given name and surname of the secretary of the Lagos State chapter of the Nigerian Medical Association. He is Babajide Saheed, not Saheed Babajide.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/11/world ... d=tw-share

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 11, 2014 8:08 am 
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Nigeria Confirms Eight Cases, Two Deaths From Ebola Virus
By Daniel Magnowski Aug 11, 2014 6:36 AM ET

A nurse in Nigeria suspected of contracting Ebola from a Liberian man who died of the virus has become the eighth person being treated in Africa’s most-populous nation, Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said.

Patrick Sawyer, a Liberian state worker, died from Ebola five days after flying into Nigeria’s commercial hub of Lagos, while a healthcare worker who had been involved in his treatment later died of the virus. All the cases have been found in Lagos. About 177 people who may have come into contact with the virus are being monitored or isolated, Chukwu said.

Ebola has historically killed as many as 90 percent of those who contract it. The current outbreak has a fatality rate of about 60 percent, killing 961 people as of Aug. 8, according to the World Health Organization. The vast majority of cases are in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia. Nigeria’s President Goodluck Jonathan last week declared Ebola a national emergency.

A panel of ethicists convened by the WHO will today begin weighing whether drugs that haven’t been widely tested for safety should be used in an outbreak. If so, the panel members must address who gets the treatments, which so far only exist in small amounts. Nigeria has applied to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for access to the experimental drug developed by Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., which was used to treat two Ebola-infected American health workers.


“Nigeria is reaching out to various laboratories and governments to see how some of those untried drugs and vaccines could be deployed in Nigeria,” said Chukwu.

To contact the reporter on this story: Daniel Magnowski in Abuja at dmagnowski@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Nasreen Seria at nseria@bloomberg.net Sarah McGregor, Ana Monteiro

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-08-1 ... lagos.html

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