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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 2:38 pm 
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The sero-conversion in the Illinois contact of the index case in Munster suggests CDC testing of contacts will yield a large number of positive cases linked to imports from Riyadh and Jeddah.

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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 3:07 pm 
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Mystery MERS Meeting Predicts More Indiana Confirmations
Recombinomics Commentary 20:30
May 19, 2014
Prior to being admitted to the hospital, the Indiana patient had extended face-to-face contact on April 25th with a business associate in Illinois. The two had another brief contact on April 26th.

Just in conclusion, our contact investigation indicates that there may have been some spread in the Indiana -- from the Indiana patient.

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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 3:08 pm 
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Two Greene County residents are awaiting test results for the MERS virus that they possibly were exposed to on a flight to Orlando, a top Greene County health official said today.

Kendra Findley, the administrator of community health and epidemiology, said the two had voluntary blood tests as part of a nationwide effort by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to test everyone who was on the flight to Orlando which originated in Saudi Arabia.

"Neither one had symptoms at all so I'm fairly confident that the test results will come back negative," Findley said.

MERS, or Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, is a viral respiratory illness first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012, according to the CDC. Most people with MERS develop acute respiratory illness with fever, cough and shortness of breath. So far, the disease has been fatal in 30 percent of cases.


For the first time, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, also known as MERS, has been passed between two people within the U.S. VPC

On May 2, the first U.S. imported case of MERS was confirmed in a traveler from Saudi Arabia. On May 11, a second U.S. imported case of MERS was confirmed in a traveler who also came from Saudi Arabia. The two U.S. cases are not linked.

On May 16, an Illinois resident who had contact with the first case of MERS in the U.S. tested positive for MERS.

MERS "represents a very low risk to the general public in this country" according to the CDC.

Findley said Greene County residents were not quarantined because they were not symptomatic.

Findley declined to reveal the identity of the two Greene County residents, their gender or their hometown.

http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/l ... s/2275032/

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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 3:30 pm 
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niman wrote:
The sero-conversion in the Illinois contact of the index case in Munster suggests CDC testing of contacts will yield a large number of positive cases linked to imports from Riyadh and Jeddah.


Have any serological surveys been conducted so far in 2 years in KSA? An engineer who was working in Riyadh and Damman once told me the state of science there is even more distorted and stunted then it is among those anti-evolution people in the Bible Belt who think the Earth is only 5000 years old and the only reason dinosaurs are extinct is they weren't on Noah's Ark.


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PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2014 3:08 pm 
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Suspected cases of MERS investigated in Virginia
by Lucy Bustamante, 13News Now

Posted on May 21, 2014 at 1:41 PM

Updated today at 2:37 PM


RICHMOND -- State health officials are investigating whether several Virginians may have been exposed to Middle East respiratory syndrome or MERS.

Dr. Laurie Forlano, the deputy state epidemiologist with the Virginia Department of Health, tells 13 News Now that they are monitoring "several" Virginians who were on airplanes and may have come into contact with people who were sick.

She stresses that no cases have been confirmed in Virginia and they’re keeping track of each region of the state, including Hampton Roads.

Dr. Forlano says "If a doctor suspects that their patient may have MERS, they have to notify the local health department. The Virginia Department of Health then works with clinicians to determine whether testing for MERS is necessary."

It takes anywhere from 24-48 hours to get results from those tests.

Three people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with MERS: a man in Orlando, Florida, one in Indiana and one in Illinois.

http://www.wvec.com/news/Suspected-case ... 12661.html

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PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2014 3:16 pm 
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VDH Monitoring "Several" Possible MERS Cases in Virginia

Posted: May 21, 2014 2:34 PM EDT


Updated: May 21, 2014 2:35 PM EDT



By WRIC Newsroom - email


RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) -
Virginia Department of Health officials are investigating, after "several" suspected cases of MERS appeared in Virginia.

VDH is monitoring "several" Virginia citizens who were on airplanes and came into contact with people who were sick with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), according to Dr. Laurie Forlano, Deputy State Epidemiologist with the Virginia Department of Health.

Although VDH officials are investigating, no cases of MERS have been confirmed in any part of the state.

So far, there have been three confirmed cases of MERS within the United States: one in Orlando, Florida, one in Illinois and the other in Indiana.

http://www.wric.com/story/25578729/vdh- ... n-virginia

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PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2014 10:06 am 
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22 May 2014 - On 2 May 2014, the National IHR Focal Point for the United States notified WHO about the first laboratory confirmed case of MERS-CoV infection in the United States.

As part of the investigation of contacts of the first confirmed case, testing for MERS-CoV was undertaken on contacts. A contact of the first case initially tested negative for MERS-CoV by PCR based on respiratory tract samples taken 10 days after contact with the first case. However, on 16 May, this contact tested positive for antibodies for MERS-CoV in a blood sample taken 14 days after contact. Currently, this individual is asymptomatic. He is a male in his 70s with comorbidities and has no history of travel to countries outside the United States.

The antibody test result suggests this individual may have been infected with MERS-CoV; however he does not meet WHO's current definition of a laboratory confirmed case of MERS-CoV, which requires positive PCR tests.

Globally, 632 laboratory-confirmed cases of infection with MERS-CoV have officially been reported to WHO, including 193 deaths. The global total includes all of the case reported in this update, plus 17 laboratory confirmed cases officially reported to WHO from Saudi Arabia between 16 and 18 May. WHO is working with Saudi Arabia for additional information on these cases and will provide further updates as soon as possible.

WHO advice

Based on the current situation and available information, WHO encourages all Member States to continue their surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) and to carefully review any unusual patterns.

Infection prevention and control measures are critical to prevent the possible spread of MERS-CoV in health care facilities. Health-care facilities that provide for patients suspected or confirmed to be infected with MERS-CoV infection should take appropriate measures to decrease the risk of transmission of the virus from an infected patient to other patients, health-care workers and visitors. Health care workers should be educated, trained and refreshed with skills on infection prevention and control.

It is not always possible to identify patients with MERS-CoV early because some have mild or unusual symptoms. For this reason, it is important that health-care workers apply standard precautions consistently with all patients – regardless of their diagnosis – in all work practices all the time.

Droplet precautions should be added to the standard precautions when providing care to all patients with symptoms of acute respiratory infection. Contact precautions and eye protection should be added when caring for probable or confirmed cases of MERS-CoV infection. Airborne precautions should be applied when performing aerosol generating procedures.

Patients should be managed as potentially infected when the clinical and epidemiological clues strongly suggest MERS-CoV, even if an initial test on a nasopharyngeal swab is negative. Repeat testing should be done when the initial testing is negative, preferably on specimens from the lower respiratory tract.

Health-care providers are advised to maintain vigilance. Recent travellers returning from the Middle East who develop SARI should be tested for MERS-CoV as advised in the current surveillance recommendations. All Member States are reminded to promptly assess and notify WHO of any new case of infection with MERS-CoV, along with information about potential exposures that may have resulted in infection and a description of the clinical course. Investigation into the source of exposure should promptly be initiated to identify the mode of exposure, so that further transmission of the virus can be prevented.

People at high risk of severe disease due to MERS-CoV should avoid close contact with animals when visiting farms or barn areas where the virus is known to be potentially circulating. For the general public, when visiting a farm or a barn, general hygiene measures, such as regular hand washing before and after touching animals, avoiding contact with sick animals, and following food hygiene practices, should be adhered to.

WHO does not advise special screening at points of entry with regard to this event nor does it currently recommend the application of any travel or trade restrictions.

http://www.who.int/csr/don/2014_05_22_mers/en/

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2014 4:39 am 
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MERS-CoV not spread to household members or health care contacts of the two U.S. cases

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has now confirmed that neither of the two imported cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in the United States spread the virus to any of their household members or to the health care workers who treated the two individuals.

In May 2014, CDC confirmed two imported cases of MERS in the United States – one in Indiana, the other in Florida. The cases were unlinked, though both infections were in health care providers who lived and worked in Saudi Arabia, where they are believed to have been infected.

As part of the public health investigation into the imported cases, CDC collected specimens from each of the household members and the health care workers with whom the two U.S. cases had close contact. CDC then tested the specimens by rRT-PCR and by serology testing. All household members and the health care workers who cared for the cases tested negative for both active and previous infection with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

“The negative results among the contacts that CDC considered at highest risk for MERS-CoV infection are reassuring.” said David Swerdlow, M.D., who is leading CDC’s MERS-CoV response. “Today, the risk of MERS-CoV infection in the United States remains low, but it is important that we remain vigilant and quickly identify and respond to any additional importations.”

In addition to testing the household and heath care contacts, CDC, state and local public health partners, and foreign ministries of health have contacted almost all of the people who traveled on the airplanes or bus with the patients. At this time, none of the travel contacts who were tested have had evidence of being infected with MERS-CoV. Investigations, including voluntary serology testing of travel contacts, are ongoing, and the situation could change.

CDC routinely advises that people help protect themselves from respiratory illnesses by taking everyday preventive actions like washing their hands often, avoiding touching their face with unwashed hands, avoiding close contact with people who appear sick, and cleaning frequently touched surfaces.

For more information about MERS-CoV, please visit:
•Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/index.html
•CDC Laboratory Testing for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV): http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/MERS/lab ... sting.html
•Frequently Asked MERS Questions and Answers: http://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/mers/faq.html

http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2014/p0617-Mers.html

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